Big Clydes --- What Saddle Do You Use?



hollowbackerdale

New Member
Jun 11, 2015
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In my way of thinking - the bigger the butt, the bigger you want the saddle. I know this is counter to what some (many?) will say.

Anyway -- I have this one.
Bontrager Cruiser Saddle - Fitness & Recreation - Saddles - Components -Trek Store

When I first start out, it is a bit uncomfortable, but after a couple of minutes it feels fine. As saddles can get up into the hundreds of dollars, I don't have the luxury of trying out many of them.
 
May 9, 2015
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I will certainly counter this. The important measurement is the distance between the sitz bones. This doesn't change as you gain or loose weight.

The saddle choice you show is certainly OK for a "comfort" bike like the Trek Shift, but it would be uncomfortable to ride on if you had a hybrid or road bike, in my opinion.
 

tarverten

New Member
May 26, 2015
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I started racing as a teenager when I weighed 190 lbs, then got up around 290 in my mid 20s. I have more recently stabilized around 240 lbs. I developed a preference for a particular shape of saddle in my late teens/early 20s, and that has not changed through all my weight changes. As mentioned above, the weight is borne by the bones beneath your pelvis, and the dimensions of these bones does not vary greatly in adulthood.

Different saddle shapes are better suited to different riding positions, and everyone has a differently shaped **** and different preferences, but in general, a more upright riding position (as found on 'comfort bikes') are better suited to wider and more padded saddles like the one you linked, while a more stretched out position that many recreational cyclists prefer are better suited to a narrower saddle that supports weight on the sitz bones and stays out of the way of the legs. Most cyclists also prefer firmer as opposed to thicker and softer padding, especially for longer rides. The softer the saddle the harder it is to keep it from putting pressure on body parts that aren't the sitz bones.
 
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blastguardgear

New Member
May 9, 2015
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In my experience, bike saddles (and motorcycle seats, sofas and recliners) that feel soft and cushy in the store when you squeeze them with your hands, will NOT feel good for the long haul under your **** as they are not supportive. I'd suggest you go to a bike shop that has one of the sitz bone indicator benches. You sit on it and the colored impressions can be measured to see what saddle will fit you best. I did that at Trek Store of Chattanooga and the saddle they recommended for my Trek Domane was very comfortable and definitely NOT one I would have expected to be.
 

thepieeatingjay

New Member
Feb 22, 2015
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Wide sit bones, plus touring -- I like the support (some would say "stiffness") of a Brooks, but the B17 just is too narrow. I ride the B68, which sadly has been discontinued.
 

swampy1970

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2008
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I've found ISM saddles really good - whether when I was fairly skinny or now when quite lard like. I currently have their Attack model.

While it did take a while to get used to it, the effort was worth it. I was never uncomfortable on it but the change and the fact that there's no nose took my head, rather than my ass, some time to make the adjustment. I always thought I was sitting too far forward on the saddle but then again as there's no nose, you just sit where the sit bone prongs feel the best.

Forget traditional methods for setting a saddle when using these saddles. Follow the recommendations on the ISM website.
 

ambal

Well-Known Member
Oct 15, 2010
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Most racing seats are too narrow, my bikes have either an old leather rolls or selle italia that doesn't look like it's gonna ass rape me when I set out for a 5 hour training ride.
 

shadowsupernature

New Member
Jun 10, 2015
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I think I found the one. It is the Selle SMP TRK 280 x 160 mm.
I also took out the stem extension that lower the hand bar and I don't have a tail bone pain anymore.
I am able now to ride my 13 miles a day without pain or numbness
 

Bonzer

Member
May 25, 2015
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Even I thought the softer the cushion the comfortable the ride will be. Perhaps all laymen tend to think that way. Yes, supporting the body frame should be the main consideration. I thought about getting a wider, cushioned seat for my stationary bike. I now change my opinion.
 

Mr. Beanz

Well-Known Member
Aug 18, 2015
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I had really great luck with the Terry Fly saddles. But the price has gone up crazy silly. I used to get them for $65 and now they are up to $120! :eek:

Then the last one I bought didn't do me well at all. Maybe they cut back in quality I dunno!

But I tried this WTB Rocket V on my single after reading reviews online. I paid about $40 for it at the local Performance. IT's been great. My usual ride is anywhere from 40-60 miles. Very comfy imo so I bought a second one for my tandem. Been an enjoyable ride!

What makes it comfy imo is that it does not have the undershell near the nose of the saddle so it's like a hammock for the boys! :p

It's an MTB saddle but I use it on my roadie. B)

FTR, I weigh in at 240!

0RocketV_zpsvmsc5hqo.jpg
 

Joshua78

New Member
Aug 29, 2015
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I went and spent 12 bucks on a schwinn suspension seat at walmart. Been a great seat for me. I'm 6 2 and 240 pounds last I stepped on the scale. So far it's held up great for several rides anywhere from 10 to 30 miles.
 

4130NewJersey

New Member
May 22, 2016
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Philadelphia, PA
I use a WTB SST on my road bike and a WTB Speed V on my cyclocross bike....both have been great for me. The SST is the closest thing to a road saddle that WTB makes and it's been great for long days in the saddle, and the Speed V has that little bit of extra cushion I need when riding my cyclocross in the dirt.
 

Fatguyonbike

New Member
May 27, 2016
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I ride a Brooks Team Pro Titanium. Once it breaks in, it is like sitting on a cloud. The break-in period is kinda rough so ramp up slowly. Do NOT do what I did and go 50 miles the first time out. ouch.
 

Audiokat

New Member
Feb 15, 2016
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I started with a larger seat thinking it was good for my size. On log rides I stared to get some rubbing on the edge of seat and my skin. Ultimately I think the saddle compressed way too much.

I settled after testing five or so saddles With the Selle Italia SLR Max Gel Flow and I really love it. It was recommended by my fitter.
 

Westborough Goose

New Member
Sep 2, 2016
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Westborough, MA
At 6' 265 lbs I've had good luck with the venerable Brooks B17. In fact, I rode a century on one last month. They're not exactly racing light at 550 grams but at my weight I could care less. If you get one, just remember to break it in before using it for any serious distance.

I've also been using a Becoz Eco saddle on my commuter which, although odd looking, is another great choice for a big guy, and currently 75% off at Nashbar
 
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Dalton Bourne

New Member
Jun 27, 2021
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I consider the Sunlite Cloud-9 Cruiser the right bike saddle for numbness. It has an ingenious design: dense on the butt section, tapering towards the groin to support the butt cheeks while removing the pressure off the perineal area. It was made by premium-quality vinyl material for durability, underneath it is a gel foam-reinforced cushion. Its 10.5-inch wide rear section is sufficient to support a male or female cyclist’s buttocks without causing discomfort.
 

patrickwise

New Member
Oct 30, 2021
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I use Bikeroo bike seat. I had no trouble sitting on the seat, it was that comfortable. The extra cushioned seat, plus the coil springs make for a good 5 mile ride. I believe I would have no trouble riding my bike for 10 miles. I just purchased the same seat for my wife, and would recommend it to anyone who is looking for a more comfortable ride.