Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Anth, May 15, 2004.

  1. Anth

    Anth Guest

    http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430 million in
    fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago illegally
    promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish resorts
    and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.

    The settlement with the world's largest pharmaceutical company over the
    company it bought, Warner-Lambert, includes a $240 million criminal fine -
    the second-largest criminal fine ever imposed in a health care fraud
    prosecution, the Justice Department said.

    Whistleblower David Franklin, the scientist who reported the marketing
    abuses to authorities, will receive $26.6 million as part of the settlement.

    "This is a standard industry practice," Franklin told The Associated Press
    in an interview. "Hopefully, real change will happen now, and this will be
    the start of something and not the end."

    Under the agreement announced Thursday by federal prosecutors, the company
    acknowledged spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to promote
    non-approved uses for the anti-seizure drug Neurontin.

    Pfizer will plead guilty to violating the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.
    Besides the $240 million criminal fine, the company will pay $152 million in
    civil fines to be shared among state and federal Medicaid agencies. Another
    $38 million would go to state consumer-protection agencies.

    The company said the activity occurred years before it bought Warner-Lambert
    in 2000.

    "Pfizer is committed to compliance with all healthcare laws and FDA
    requirements and to high ethical standards in all aspects of its business
    practices," the company said in a statement.

    The case began in 1996, when Franklin filed a whistleblower lawsuit against
    drug maker Parke-Davis and its parent company Warner-Lambert, alleging it
    used an illegal marketing plan to drive up Neurontin sales in the 1990s.

    The lawsuit alleged that while Neurontin was approved only as an epilepsy
    drug, the company promoted it for relieving pain, headaches, bipolar
    disorder and other psychiatric illnesses.

    While doctors can prescribe drugs for any use, the promotion of drugs for
    these so-called "off-label uses" is prohibited by the Food and Drug Cosmetic
    Act.

    Last May, federal prosecutors in Boston filed a brief in support of
    Franklin's lawsuit, and have since been in settlement negotiations with New
    York-based Pfizer to recover money the Medicaid program spent on Neurontin.

    Franklin's lawsuit alleged that the company's publicity plan included paying
    doctors to put their names on ghostwritten articles about Neurontin and to
    induce them to prescribe the drug for various uses by giving them tickets to
    sporting events, trips to golf resorts and speakers fees. One doctor
    received almost $308,000 to speak at conferences about the drug.

    Neurontin's sales soared from $97.5 million in 1995 to nearly $2.7 billion
    in 2003.

    "We believe we have exposed an illegal practice in the pharmaceutical
    industry that caused the Medicaid program to pay tens of millions of dollars
    for off-label prescriptions that were not eligible for reimbursement under
    the Medicaid program," said Franklin's attorney, Thomas Greene.

    Franklin, 42, said Warner-Lambert had conducted a clinical trial that showed
    Neurontin was less effective than a placebo for treating bipolar disorder,
    but it never published those findings and told doctors the drug was highly
    effective for treating the psychological condition.

    "Patients every day are still taking this drug hoping it's effective, and
    there's really no evidence for that," Franklin said.

    They'll do anything to make a few bucks...

    Anth
     
    Tags:


  2. DRCEEPHD

    DRCEEPHD Guest

    >Subject: Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'
    >From: "Anth" [email protected]
    >Date: 5/15/04 3:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>


    >Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges


    So who is going to jail? If a criminal act was committed, then someone or some
    group should be doing jail time.

    If one can pay a fine and not go to jail, then this should apply to Enron and
    Martha as well. Are we on an even playing field or is medicine and all its
    lies on another plane?

    DrC PhD
     
  3. Anth

    Anth Guest

    http://www.mercola.com/2004/may/15/drug_companies_evil.htm
    Anth

    "Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    > Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430 million in
    > fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago illegally
    > promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish resorts
    > and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.
    >
    > The settlement with the world's largest pharmaceutical company over the
    > company it bought, Warner-Lambert, includes a $240 million criminal fine -
    > the second-largest criminal fine ever imposed in a health care fraud
    > prosecution, the Justice Department said.
    >
    > Whistleblower David Franklin, the scientist who reported the marketing
    > abuses to authorities, will receive $26.6 million as part of the

    settlement.
    >
    > "This is a standard industry practice," Franklin told The Associated Press
    > in an interview. "Hopefully, real change will happen now, and this will be
    > the start of something and not the end."
    >
    > Under the agreement announced Thursday by federal prosecutors, the company
    > acknowledged spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to promote
    > non-approved uses for the anti-seizure drug Neurontin.
    >
    > Pfizer will plead guilty to violating the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.
    > Besides the $240 million criminal fine, the company will pay $152 million

    in
    > civil fines to be shared among state and federal Medicaid agencies.

    Another
    > $38 million would go to state consumer-protection agencies.
    >
    > The company said the activity occurred years before it bought

    Warner-Lambert
    > in 2000.
    >
    > "Pfizer is committed to compliance with all healthcare laws and FDA
    > requirements and to high ethical standards in all aspects of its business
    > practices," the company said in a statement.
    >
    > The case began in 1996, when Franklin filed a whistleblower lawsuit

    against
    > drug maker Parke-Davis and its parent company Warner-Lambert, alleging it
    > used an illegal marketing plan to drive up Neurontin sales in the 1990s.
    >
    > The lawsuit alleged that while Neurontin was approved only as an epilepsy
    > drug, the company promoted it for relieving pain, headaches, bipolar
    > disorder and other psychiatric illnesses.
    >
    > While doctors can prescribe drugs for any use, the promotion of drugs for
    > these so-called "off-label uses" is prohibited by the Food and Drug

    Cosmetic
    > Act.
    >
    > Last May, federal prosecutors in Boston filed a brief in support of
    > Franklin's lawsuit, and have since been in settlement negotiations with

    New
    > York-based Pfizer to recover money the Medicaid program spent on

    Neurontin.
    >
    > Franklin's lawsuit alleged that the company's publicity plan included

    paying
    > doctors to put their names on ghostwritten articles about Neurontin and to
    > induce them to prescribe the drug for various uses by giving them tickets

    to
    > sporting events, trips to golf resorts and speakers fees. One doctor
    > received almost $308,000 to speak at conferences about the drug.
    >
    > Neurontin's sales soared from $97.5 million in 1995 to nearly $2.7 billion
    > in 2003.
    >
    > "We believe we have exposed an illegal practice in the pharmaceutical
    > industry that caused the Medicaid program to pay tens of millions of

    dollars
    > for off-label prescriptions that were not eligible for reimbursement under
    > the Medicaid program," said Franklin's attorney, Thomas Greene.
    >
    > Franklin, 42, said Warner-Lambert had conducted a clinical trial that

    showed
    > Neurontin was less effective than a placebo for treating bipolar disorder,
    > but it never published those findings and told doctors the drug was highly
    > effective for treating the psychological condition.
    >
    > "Patients every day are still taking this drug hoping it's effective, and
    > there's really no evidence for that," Franklin said.
    >
    > They'll do anything to make a few bucks...
    >
    > Anth
    >
    >
     
  4. Anth

    Anth Guest

    When you play monopoly with peoples lives (and have lots of money) you get a
    'get out of jail free card.'
    Anth

    "DRCEEPHD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >Subject: Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'
    > >From: "Anth" [email protected]
    > >Date: 5/15/04 3:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    > >Message-id: <[email protected]>

    >
    > >Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges

    >
    > So who is going to jail? If a criminal act was committed, then someone or

    some
    > group should be doing jail time.
    >
    > If one can pay a fine and not go to jail, then this should apply to Enron

    and
    > Martha as well. Are we on an even playing field or is medicine and all

    its
    > lies on another plane?
    >
    > DrC PhD
     
  5. DRCEEPHD

    DRCEEPHD Guest

    >Subject: Re: Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'
    >From: "Anth" [email protected]
    >Date: 5/15/04 4:02 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>


    >When you play monopoly with peoples lives (and have lots of money) you get a
    >'get out of jail free card.'
    >Anth


    I really like that answer.
    Thanks a lot.

    DrC PhD
     
  6. Jan

    Jan Guest

    >Subject: Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'
    >From: "Anth" [email protected]
    >Date: 5/15/2004 11:07 AM Pacific Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>


    Thay are all a bunch of liars, dishonest and the love of $$$$ is the root of
    all evel.

    Jan

    >http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    >Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430 million in
    >fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago illegally
    >promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish resorts
    >and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.
    >
    >The settlement with the world's largest pharmaceutical company over the
    >company it bought, Warner-Lambert, includes a $240 million criminal fine -
    >the second-largest criminal fine ever imposed in a health care fraud
    >prosecution, the Justice Department said.
    >
    >Whistleblower David Franklin, the scientist who reported the marketing
    >abuses to authorities, will receive $26.6 million as part of the settlement.
    >
    >"This is a standard industry practice," Franklin told The Associated Press
    >in an interview. "Hopefully, real change will happen now, and this will be
    >the start of something and not the end."
    >
    >Under the agreement announced Thursday by federal prosecutors, the company
    >acknowledged spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to promote
    >non-approved uses for the anti-seizure drug Neurontin.
    >
    >Pfizer will plead guilty to violating the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.
    >Besides the $240 million criminal fine, the company will pay $152 million in
    >civil fines to be shared among state and federal Medicaid agencies. Another
    >$38 million would go to state consumer-protection agencies.
    >
    >The company said the activity occurred years before it bought Warner-Lambert
    >in 2000.
    >
    >"Pfizer is committed to compliance with all healthcare laws and FDA
    >requirements and to high ethical standards in all aspects of its business
    >practices," the company said in a statement.
    >
    >The case began in 1996, when Franklin filed a whistleblower lawsuit against
    >drug maker Parke-Davis and its parent company Warner-Lambert, alleging it
    >used an illegal marketing plan to drive up Neurontin sales in the 1990s.
    >
    >The lawsuit alleged that while Neurontin was approved only as an epilepsy
    >drug, the company promoted it for relieving pain, headaches, bipolar
    >disorder and other psychiatric illnesses.
    >
    >While doctors can prescribe drugs for any use, the promotion of drugs for
    >these so-called "off-label uses" is prohibited by the Food and Drug Cosmetic
    >Act.
    >
    >Last May, federal prosecutors in Boston filed a brief in support of
    >Franklin's lawsuit, and have since been in settlement negotiations with New
    >York-based Pfizer to recover money the Medicaid program spent on Neurontin.
    >
    >Franklin's lawsuit alleged that the company's publicity plan included paying
    >doctors to put their names on ghostwritten articles about Neurontin and to
    >induce them to prescribe the drug for various uses by giving them tickets to
    >sporting events, trips to golf resorts and speakers fees. One doctor
    >received almost $308,000 to speak at conferences about the drug.
    >
    >Neurontin's sales soared from $97.5 million in 1995 to nearly $2.7 billion
    >in 2003.
    >
    >"We believe we have exposed an illegal practice in the pharmaceutical
    >industry that caused the Medicaid program to pay tens of millions of dollars
    >for off-label prescriptions that were not eligible for reimbursement under
    >the Medicaid program," said Franklin's attorney, Thomas Greene.
    >
    >Franklin, 42, said Warner-Lambert had conducted a clinical trial that showed
    >Neurontin was less effective than a placebo for treating bipolar disorder,
    >but it never published those findings and told doctors the drug was highly
    >effective for treating the psychological condition.
    >
    >"Patients every day are still taking this drug hoping it's effective, and
    >there's really no evidence for that," Franklin said.
    >
    >They'll do anything to make a few bucks...
    >
    >Anth
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  7. David Wright

    David Wright Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    DRCEEPHD <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Subject: Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'
    >>From: "Anth" [email protected]
    >>Date: 5/15/04 3:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    >>Message-id: <[email protected]>

    >
    >>Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges

    >
    >So who is going to jail? If a criminal act was committed, then
    >someone or some group should be doing jail time.


    Not all criminal acts result in jail time, or the jails would be
    overflowing with people who let their parking meters expire.

    -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
     
  8. Jan

    Jan Guest

    >Subject: Re: Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'
    >From: [email protected] (David Wright)
    >Date: 5/15/2004 5:17 PM Pacific Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >DRCEEPHD <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>Subject: Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'
    >>>From: "Anth" [email protected]
    >>>Date: 5/15/04 3:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time
    >>>Message-id: <[email protected]>

    >>
    >>>Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges

    >>
    >>So who is going to jail? If a criminal act was committed, then
    >>someone or some group should be doing jail time.

    >
    >Not all criminal acts result in jail time,


    *IF* one happens to be a member of organized medicine.

    Comon David tell the whole story.

    In fact, just a few months before Jesse had signed up for the experiment,
    several monkeys given viruses similar to Jesse’s got sick. And two of them
    died.
    The doses were larger, but, even so, government rules say reactions like
    that in animals must be reported in order to protect people.


    ****But neither the Gelsingers nor the government was notified.***

    “I read that statement at the end, the little tiny paragraph, one sentence,
    that Jim Wilson had a vested interest in this. And I said: ‘Yes, well I’d
    have an interest in something that I was doing, too. But I had no idea the
    extent of that interest. That this man had patents on this adenovirus.’”
    — PAUL GELSINGER


    ***“They had had adverse reactions in monkeys and they had not reported it to
    the F.D.A.,” says Paul. “In fact, the monkey had the same reaction that
    Jesse had.”****


    And Paul Gelsinger heard something else just as alarming. The rules for
    the experiment said: Even if volunteers didn’t get visibly ill, if tests
    showed that any of them had a significant reaction called “grade 3,” the
    experiment was supposed to be “halted” immediately.
    Records show there were “grade 3” reactions in more than one
    patient.

    The*** first time**

    , doctors stopped, called the government and got permission to continue, saying
    an unusual condition with the patient might have been the cause.


    ***The second time***, they stopped, called and got permission again,
    citing another unusual condition.


    But when it happened

    ***a third time***

    , they didn’t stop, didn’t call.


    ***Then, a fourth time***

    .. They didn’t stop or call then either.
    “They continued anyway,

    ***in violation of the protocol****

    ,” says Paul. “And I had no knowledge of that.”
    Nobody said anything about that in their meeting or subsequent
    conversation?
    “No,” says Paul.
    In the months that followed, leading up to Jesse, there were several
    more volunteers who didn’t get sick. But the dose kept getting larger.
    And there was more.

    *** Government investigators said the Penn doctors had even bent the rules****

    about who could volunteer for the experiment.
    For their own safety, volunteers weren’t supposed to have a blood
    ammonia level higher than 50. But people were coming in with higher levels and
    without proper approval. The limit was raised to 70.
    When Jesse signed up over the summer, he was within the limits, but
    records show that when Penn doctors tested him, just days before the
    experiment,

    ***his reading was 114 — more than double the original safety limit.***


    With medication, doctors brought the level down, but the government
    concluded: Jesse Gelsinger should never have been allowed in the experiment in
    the first place.

    the University of Pennsylvania and Dr. James Wilson,” the man in charge of
    the experiment,

    ***had a “financial interest in a successful outcome.” ***

    At the University of Pennsylvania, the conflict committee approved Dr.
    Wilson’s arrangement with Genovo.


    *** In fact, the university itself owned a piece of his company and stood to
    profit, too. ***


    In a statement, the university acknowledged that some information
    “should have been shared with the FDA sooner.”

    ***“There was no information given to Jesse or his family about the monkey
    deaths. There was no information given to Jesse or his family about toxic
    results in prior patients. There was no information that would allow Jesse and
    his family to make any kind of informed decision.”****

    So, while the government knew about them, other researchers like Dr. Wilson and

    *** volunteers like Jesse Gelsinger were never allowed to see them.***


    What did he think when he learned that it was legal to stamp these
    things “confidential?”

    In February, the Food and Drug Administration said that because Dr. Wilson
    filed

    ***“false and misleading” reports and “repeatedly and deliberately
    violated regulations”.***


    It is attempting to ban him from any other experiments involving humans.

    Within weeks of filing this lawsuit against the university, Dr. Wilson, and
    other doctors on his team, the defendants settled

    *** without admitting any wrong doing.***

    At the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Wilson is

    *** still on the faculty***

    but no longer in charge of its gene therapy program
    ========================

    Jan
     
  9. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    Jan the Accuser wrote:

    > Thay are all a bunch of liars, dishonest and the love of $$$$ is the root of
    > all evel.
    >
    > Jan


    Prove it. You accuse people all the time of lying
    just because they disagree with you, but you NEVER
    back up your accusations with proof.

    Do you need help seeing what PROOF looks like, Jan?

    Here is an example:

    To see Jan's ORIGINAL POSTING, go here:
    http://www.google.com/[email protected]

    Jan wrote:

    > >From: Mark Thorson [email protected]
    > >
    > >Instead of responding to what you say, Jan is trying to discredit
    > >you by making insinuations about who you are or what your
    > >motives may be.
    > >
    > >Soon, she may accuse you of being on the payroll of the
    > >pharmaceutical companies, etc. That's the way Jan works.

    >
    > That would be ANOTHER LIE from Mark Thorson. I have NEVER accused

    anyone of
    > any such thing.
    >
    > So do prove your claim Mark!!!!!
    >
    > You can't YOU JUST LIED AGAIN!!!!!!!



    ----- example quotes of Jan accusing people of being paid shills -----

    Quoting from this ORIGINAL posting from Jan Drew:
    http://www.google.com/[email protected]

    Any time alt. health is mentioned the personal trashing starts. Mostly
    comes from paid shill Mark Probert.

    Quoting from this ORIGINAL posting from Jan Drew:
    http://www.google.com/[email protected]

    Internet bully Mark Probert who is a paid shill and lives off his wife.

    Quoting from this ORIGINAL posting from Jan Drew:
    http://www.google.com/[email protected]

    As for Mark, he is a paid shill and lives off his wife.

    Quoting from this ORIGINAL posting from Jan Drew:
    http://www.google.com/[email protected]

    As long as Mark is here, the paid shill will call names when in fact
    he is the one who is a bigot. Speaking of his own people.
     
  10. Peter Moran

    Peter Moran Guest

    "Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    > Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430 million in
    > fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago illegally
    > promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish resorts
    > and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.


    Drug companies in Australia are not allowed by law to give doctors gifts
    over a value of $10.

    Peter Moran
     
  11. David Wright

    David Wright Guest

    In article <[email protected]works.com.au>,
    Peter Moran <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    >> Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430 million in
    >> fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago illegally
    >> promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish resorts
    >> and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.

    >
    >Drug companies in Australia are not allowed by law to give doctors gifts
    >over a value of $10.


    Either way, this news story had nothing to do with alternative health
    and thus didn't belong on m.h.a in the first place. What's with you,
    Anth? Have you been taking lessons in "how to post inappropriately"
    from Ilena?

    -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
     
  12. Anth

    Anth Guest

    Pharma can't be trusted, they are disinformation experts, and soon through
    CODEX they will control vitamin access.
    Anth

    "David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > In article

    <[email protected]works.com.a
    u>,
    > Peter Moran <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >> http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    > >> Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430 million

    in
    > >> fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago

    illegally
    > >> promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish

    resorts
    > >> and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.

    > >
    > >Drug companies in Australia are not allowed by law to give doctors gifts
    > >over a value of $10.

    >
    > Either way, this news story had nothing to do with alternative health
    > and thus didn't belong on m.h.a in the first place. What's with you,
    > Anth? Have you been taking lessons in "how to post inappropriately"
    > from Ilena?
    >
    > -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    > These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    > "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    > were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    >
    >
    >
     
  13. David Wright

    David Wright Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Pharma can't be trusted, they are disinformation experts, and soon through
    >CODEX they will control vitamin access.


    Good attempt at dodging, Anth, but ineffective. I repeat, why did you
    post the story when it had nothing to do with alternative health?

    -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)






    >"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:p[email protected]
    >> In article

    ><[email protected]works.com.a
    >u>,
    >> Peter Moran <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >news:[email protected]
    >> >> http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    >> >> Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430 million

    >in
    >> >> fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago

    >illegally
    >> >> promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish

    >resorts
    >> >> and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.
    >> >
    >> >Drug companies in Australia are not allowed by law to give doctors gifts
    >> >over a value of $10.

    >>
    >> Either way, this news story had nothing to do with alternative health
    >> and thus didn't belong on m.h.a in the first place. What's with you,
    >> Anth? Have you been taking lessons in "how to post inappropriately"
    >> from Ilena?
    >>
    >> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    >> These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    >> "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    >> were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
  14. >In article <[email protected]>,
    >Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Pharma can't be trusted, they are disinformation experts, and soon through
    >>CODEX they will control vitamin access.

    >
    >Good attempt at dodging, Anth, but ineffective. I repeat, why did you
    >post the story when it had nothing to do with alternative health?


    Anth doesn't have much of a life outside of MHA.

    > -- David Wright :
     
  15. Anth

    Anth Guest

    It wasn't dodging David.
    Anth

    "David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Pharma can't be trusted, they are disinformation experts, and soon

    through
    > >CODEX they will control vitamin access.

    >
    > Good attempt at dodging, Anth, but ineffective. I repeat, why did you
    > post the story when it had nothing to do with alternative health?
    >
    > -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    > These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    > "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    > were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:p[email protected]
    > >> In article

    >
    ><[email protected]works.com.

    a
    > >u>,
    > >> Peter Moran <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >"Anth" <llsa_needs[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >news:[email protected]
    > >> >>

    http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    > >> >> Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430

    million
    > >in
    > >> >> fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago

    > >illegally
    > >> >> promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish

    > >resorts
    > >> >> and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.
    > >> >
    > >> >Drug companies in Australia are not allowed by law to give doctors

    gifts
    > >> >over a value of $10.
    > >>
    > >> Either way, this news story had nothing to do with alternative health
    > >> and thus didn't belong on m.h.a in the first place. What's with you,
    > >> Anth? Have you been taking lessons in "how to post inappropriately"
    > >> from Ilena?
    > >>
    > >> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    > >> These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    > >> "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    > >> were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  16. Anth

    Anth Guest

    (Are you saying CODEX has nothing to do with misc.health.alternative?)
    Anth

    "David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Pharma can't be trusted, they are disinformation experts, and soon

    through
    > >CODEX they will control vitamin access.

    >
    > Good attempt at dodging, Anth, but ineffective. I repeat, why did you
    > post the story when it had nothing to do with alternative health?
    >
    > -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    > These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    > "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    > were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:p[email protected]
    > >> In article

    >
    ><[email protected]works.com.

    a
    > >u>,
    > >> Peter Moran <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >news:[email protected]
    > >> >>

    http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    > >> >> Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430

    million
    > >in
    > >> >> fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago

    > >illegally
    > >> >> promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish

    > >resorts
    > >> >> and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.
    > >> >
    > >> >Drug companies in Australia are not allowed by law to give doctors

    gifts
    > >> >over a value of $10.
    > >>
    > >> Either way, this news story had nothing to do with alternative health
    > >> and thus didn't belong on m.h.a in the first place. What's with you,
    > >> Anth? Have you been taking lessons in "how to post inappropriately"
    > >> from Ilena?
    > >>
    > >> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    > >> These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    > >> "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    > >> were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  17. David Wright

    David Wright Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
    >(Are you saying CODEX has nothing to do with misc.health.alternative?)


    The original article had nothing to do with Codex and everything to do
    with Pfizer paying a large fine for criminal behavior. You are trying
    to justify your posting by dragging in Codex. It won't wash. You're
    as bad as Ilena or Jan, who seem to feel the actual purpose for this
    newsgroup is to bash conventional medicine. Well, it ain't.

    -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)






    >"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >Pharma can't be trusted, they are disinformation experts, and soon

    >through
    >> >CODEX they will control vitamin access.

    >>
    >> Good attempt at dodging, Anth, but ineffective. I repeat, why did you
    >> post the story when it had nothing to do with alternative health?
    >>
    >> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    >> These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    >> "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    >> were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> >"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >news:p[email protected]
    >> >> In article

    >>
    >><[email protected]works.com.

    >a
    >> >u>,
    >> >> Peter Moran <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> >news:[email protected]
    >> >> >>

    >http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    >> >> >> Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430

    >million
    >> >in
    >> >> >> fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago
    >> >illegally
    >> >> >> promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish
    >> >resorts
    >> >> >> and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >Drug companies in Australia are not allowed by law to give doctors

    >gifts
    >> >> >over a value of $10.
    >> >>
    >> >> Either way, this news story had nothing to do with alternative health
    >> >> and thus didn't belong on m.h.a in the first place. What's with you,
    >> >> Anth? Have you been taking lessons in "how to post inappropriately"
    >> >> from Ilena?
    >> >>
    >> >> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    >> >> These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    >> >> "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    >> >> were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
  18. Anth

    Anth Guest

    Bash conventional medicine? Since when is medicine that doesn't work
    medicine?
    These guys are crooks I have a _every_ right to bash it.
    Anth

    "David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >(Are you saying CODEX has nothing to do with misc.health.alternative?)

    >
    > The original article had nothing to do with Codex and everything to do
    > with Pfizer paying a large fine for criminal behavior. You are trying
    > to justify your posting by dragging in Codex. It won't wash. You're
    > as bad as Ilena or Jan, who seem to feel the actual purpose for this
    > newsgroup is to bash conventional medicine. Well, it ain't.
    >
    > -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    > These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    > "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    > were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >> In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> Anth <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >Pharma can't be trusted, they are disinformation experts, and soon

    > >through
    > >> >CODEX they will control vitamin access.
    > >>
    > >> Good attempt at dodging, Anth, but ineffective. I repeat, why did you
    > >> post the story when it had nothing to do with alternative health?
    > >>
    > >> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    > >> These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    > >> "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    > >> were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> >"David Wright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >news:p[email protected]
    > >> >> In article
    > >>

    >
    >><[email protected]works.com

    ..
    > >a
    > >> >u>,
    > >> >> Peter Moran <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in

    message
    > >> >> >news:[email protected]
    > >> >> >>

    > >http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    > >> >> >> Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430

    > >million
    > >> >in
    > >> >> >> fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago
    > >> >illegally
    > >> >> >> promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish
    > >> >resorts
    > >> >> >> and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >Drug companies in Australia are not allowed by law to give doctors

    > >gifts
    > >> >> >over a value of $10.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Either way, this news story had nothing to do with alternative

    health
    > >> >> and thus didn't belong on m.h.a in the first place. What's with

    you,
    > >> >> Anth? Have you been taking lessons in "how to post inappropriately"
    > >> >> from Ilena?
    > >> >>
    > >> >> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    > >> >> These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    > >> >> "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    > >> >> were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  19. Jan

    Jan Guest

    >Subject: Re: Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'
    >From: [email protected] (David Wright)
    >Date: 5/16/2004 10:22 AM Pacific Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >In article
    ><[email protected]works.co

    m.au>,
    >Peter Moran <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>"Anth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]
    >>> http://www.pharmabiz.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=21870&sectionid=
    >>> Pfizer Inc will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $430 million in
    >>> fines to settle charges that a company it bought four years ago illegally
    >>> promoted non-approved uses for a drug by flying doctors to lavish resorts
    >>> and paying them hefty speakers' fees to tout it.

    >>
    >>Drug companies in Australia are not allowed by law to give doctors gifts
    >>over a value of $10.

    >
    >Either way, this news story had nothing to do with alternative health


    ZZzz.

    Alternative is alternative from conventional.

    Let's see if David only speaks of alternative medicine and not conventional.

    He doesn't, he is a hypocrite with a desire to protect conventional medicine,
    even we they are dishonest. He wants it to remain a big secret.

    Jan
     
  20. Hawki63

    Hawki63 Guest

    >Subject: Re: Big Pharma is fined 'pocket change'
    >From: "Anth" [email protected]
    >Date: 5/16/2004 1:39 PM Pacific Daylight Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>


    >Bash conventional medicine? Since when is medicine that doesn't work
    >medicine?
    >These guys are crooks I have a _every_ right to bash it.
    >Anth


    Anth....I believe Most of us would agree that Pfizer was/is wrong...and that
    they got what they deserve

    Codex on the other hand...is an entirely different topic...


    hawki.....
     
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