BigHa again

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Joshua Goldberg, Feb 11, 2003.

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  1. Yellowbike (Optima) worked for a while. Lots of bents are sold On-Line now re: Hostel Shoppe. It
    will be a very hardsell (without the ability to Test Ride 1st), maybe they'll take the Bent on the
    road to Group rides and let people do their test rides this way.

    $3K is really up there...bet the price may fall (it will have to). Hope BigHa is NOT designed to be
    a Tax writedown for a another BigHa venture that makes too much profit.

    I would not buy such a bent, but then again some people have Sh*t for Brains and buy really big SUVs
    and HumVs for 10 mile commutes and for them the BigHa would be fine.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    "Robert Stevahn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 11 Feb 2003 21:03:37 -0500, "Joshua Goldberg" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >The executives from BikeE crossed the road to BigHa, does it follow that BigHa is doomed because
    > >of this?
    >
    > No. BigHa is doomed because their product will appeal to neither novice comfort bike users nor
    > experienced recumbent riders given that configuration and price. Not to mention the
    > mail-order-only thing. Big Ha indeed. I don't mean to slam the people that are dedicating their
    > lives to this project, but it's so clearly DOA that it's amazing they haven't already killed it.
    >
    > -- Robert
     


  2. Brian Rost

    Brian Rost Guest

    Robert Stevahn wrote:
    >
    > I don't mean to slam the people that are dedicating their lives to this project, but it's so
    > clearly DOA that it's amazing they haven't already killed it.

    Assuming their investors required the usual "due diligence" they must have SOME marketing research
    that indicates a potential market. I mean, look at the Segway!

    --

    Brian Rost
    Stargen, Inc.

    **********************************************************************
     
  3. On Wed, 12 Feb 2003 11:04:40 -0500, "Joshua Goldberg" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I would not buy such a bent, but then again some people have Sh*t for Brains and buy really big
    >SUVs and HumVs for 10 mile commutes and for them the BigHa would be fine.

    I love it. You do have a point.

    -- Robert, still predicting failure
     
  4. John W

    John W Guest

    > So you are saying that you will lie to your customers and dealers if it is in your best interest?

    Don't you know, when it comes to business, its the American way.
     
  5. Joshua Goldberg wrote:
    >
    > Yellowbike (Optima) worked for a while. Lots of bents are sold On-Line now re: Hostel Shoppe. It
    > will be a very hardsell (without the ability to Test Ride 1st), maybe they'll take the Bent on the
    > road to Group rides and let people do their test rides this way.
    >
    > $3K is really up there...bet the price may fall (it will have to). Hope BigHa is NOT designed to
    > be a Tax writedown for a another BigHa venture that makes too much profit.
    >
    > I would not buy such a bent, but then again some people have Sh*t for Brains and buy really big
    > SUVs and HumVs for 10 mile commutes and for them the BigHa would be fine.
    > ----------------------------------------------------------
    > "Robert Stevahn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > On Tue, 11 Feb 2003 21:03:37 -0500, "Joshua Goldberg" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >The executives from BikeE crossed the road to BigHa, does it follow that BigHa is doomed
    > > >because of this?
    > >
    > > No. BigHa is doomed because their product will appeal to neither novice comfort bike users nor
    > > experienced recumbent riders given that configuration and price. Not to mention the
    > > mail-order-only thing. Big Ha indeed. I don't mean to slam the people that are dedicating their
    > > lives to this project, but it's so clearly DOA that it's amazing they haven't already killed it.
    > >
    > > -- Robert

    Hostel Shoppe is a brick and mortar operation as well as a snail mail catalog and on-line dealer.
    They are a multi-line dealer, not a manufacturer. If one of their suppliers goes under (like BikeE
    did) it's no big deal, they have a dozen others. This is all quite a bit different from a
    manufacture selling one product direct by internet only. Most importantly Hostel Shoppe has a
    reputation for honest dealing and fair prices. What kind of reputation does the people working at
    Bighaha have? They think they are going to cut out the middleman to maximize profit AND sell at
    twice the competitive price. Gee, why isn't everyone else doing the same?

    Lorenzo L. Love http://home.thegrid.net/~lllove

    "A people living under the perpetual menace of war and invasion is very easy to govern. It demands
    no social reforms. It does not haggle over expenditures on armaments and military equipment. It pays
    without discussion, it ruins itself, and that is an excellent thing for the syndicates of financiers
    and manufacturers for whom patriotic terrors are an abundant source of gain." Anatole France
     
  6. I may have read it wrong Brian, but I think John Acres said that He alone is bankrolling BigHa from
    profits he has made on another past or current...(unsure which)venture. BigHa has 16 employees (4
    for sure came from BikeE). My take is that IF Mr.Acres believes in what he is doing and has the $ to
    do it, then it will happen. IF BigHa goes glug, at least this time Dealers will not be shafted.
    BikeE was a pretty good little bent for the money, just because the wheels fell of the Company does
    not mean the wheels will fall off every bent they ever made.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    "Brian Rost" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Robert Stevahn wrote:
    > >
    > > I don't mean to slam the people that are dedicating their lives to this project, but it's so
    > > clearly DOA that it's amazing they haven't already killed it.
    >
    > Assuming their investors required the usual "due diligence" they must have SOME marketing research
    > that indicates a potential market. I mean, look at the Segway!
    >
    > --
    >
    > Brian Rost
    > Stargen, Inc.
    >
    > **********************************************************************
     
  7. John Acres

    John Acres Guest

    It seems three are a number if issues within this thread of comments:

    1. BiGHA's is a dumb design. That's possibly true. I think it is a good design. Bt I've been
    wrong--and right--before. I certainly agree the company is a huge risk in product and manner of
    distribution. Time will tell.

    2. BiGHA is manned by executives of BikeE. I'm not exactly sure of what an executive is. BiGHA hired
    a couple of sales people, an accounting clerk, assembly people and two designers from BikeE/ Are
    they executives? I was an investor at BikeE--I lost a lot of mney there--but I was never on the
    BikeE payroll nor did I ever do any paid consulting for BikeE. In fact, I never received payment
    of any form from BikeE, though I did invest in that company. I don't consider myself an executive
    but I've really never understood what that word is supposed to mean.

    3. BiGHA is a bad company because the people at BikeE were dishonest. I disagree with both
    contentions. I know the people that staffed BikeE. All are decent, honest people. I left BikeE
    entirely in March of 2002 so I was not involved directly in the final days. But I was tracking
    their progress because I hoped they'd pull thorugh and they owed me a lot of money. BikeE did
    everything it could to survive. They reduced staff, moved to smaller quarters and cut costs
    wherever they could. BikeE was always an underfunded company and had narrowly escaped death many,
    many times during its history. It didn't survive this last scrape.

    BikeE's demise was not clear to me until the final day when it simply ran out of money. They made
    payroll and had nothing left. Bike dealers are, for the most part, wonderful people. But not all of
    them pay their bills. A few because they're dishonest. Most because they've got cash problems like
    everyone else. BikeE was also supposed to collect from a couple of component vendors that had been
    responsible for the defects that caused the recalls. For whatever reson, that money did not come
    through and its difficult to chase a debt in Taiwan.

    I think it's unfair to characterize BikeE staff like this. They did not know that the end was
    emminent. Sure, you can look back in hindsight now and say the indicators were clear. But that's
    hindsight. BikeE's employees were trying to save their dream. They were caught between creditors
    that wanted repayment--including me, a shortage of cash and a slow economy.

    To me, they behaved exactly as a good basketball team that is 20 points down with five minutes to
    go. They didn't count failure as an option. If that's a crime, I'd be pleased to share a jail cell
    with such people.

    Everyone is entitled to their own opiniuon. No one lost more from BikeE than I did. I miss those
    dollars very much. But I also miss that another US manufacturer dropped away. I am sad that several
    good people los ttheir jobs. And yeah, I feel badly for BikeE owners--which I am one of as well.

    But I am not bitter and I am not angry. Life is about exploration and adventure. These cannot be
    worthwhile without risk. I consider BikeE a valiant effort that ultimately failed, though my role
    was only as an investor. My attentions are now on BiGHA. I am very glad to have the chance to
    associate with everyone at BiGHA. I count as friends the people of BikeE as well. There's not one of
    that I would not entrust my wallet to.

    Like I said, you are each entitled to think what you want. I wish you well.

    "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Methinks the chances of the average BigHa buyer:
    >
    > a. knowing that some BigHa personnel had anything to do with BikeE, and/or
    > b. knowing that BikeE went titsup.com while keeping it in the dark for a couple of months
    >
    > are slim. What Lorenzo said seems closer to the mark.
    >
    > Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    > ===========================================================
    > Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    > http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    > ===========================================================
     
  8. On 14 Feb 2003 14:30:20 -0800, [email protected] (john Acres) wrote:

    [A very classy post.]

    Even though I'm not sold on what I've seen of BigHA so far, I do wish you and your team well, and I
    hope you succeed. I hope you succeed well enough to design a cool high-racer with all the nifty
    built-ins!

    -- Robert
     
  9. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

    [email protected] (john Acres) wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > It seems three are a number if issues within this thread of comments:
    >
    > 1. BiGHA's is a dumb design. That's possibly true. I think it is a good design. Bt I've been
    > wrong--and right--before. I certainly agree the company is a huge risk in product and manner of
    > distribution. Time will tell.
    >
    > 2. BiGHA is manned by executives of BikeE. I'm not exactly sure of what an executive is.

    Executives are those unseen shadowy boogie-men behind most of society's
    ills. They do no actual work and are on earth only to exploit the labors of others. That is the
    definition I hear all the time, all though it isn't MY definition.(~: Oh yeah, they wear suits
    and drive big cars.

    >BiGHA hired a couple of sales people, an accounting clerk, assembly people and two designers from
    >BikeE/ Are they executives? I was an investor at BikeE--I lost a lot of mney there--but I was never
    >on the BikeE payroll nor did I ever do any paid consulting for BikeE. In fact, I never received
    >payment of any form from BikeE, though I did invest in that company. I don't consider myself an
    >executive but I've really never understood what that word is supposed to mean.
    >
    > 3. BiGHA is a bad company because the people at BikeE were dishonest. I disagree with both
    > contentions. I know the people that staffed BikeE. All are decent, honest people. I left BikeE
    > entirely in March of 2002 so I was not involved directly in the final days. But I was tracking
    > their progress because I hoped they'd pull thorugh and they owed me a lot of money. BikeE did
    > everything it could to survive. They reduced staff, moved to smaller quarters and cut costs
    > wherever they could. BikeE was always an underfunded company and had narrowly escaped death
    > many, many times during its history. It didn't survive this last scrape.
    >

    I am very "closely associated" with a biz owner, my S.O.,and it would probably surprise employees if
    they knew how close and frequently the company has come to shutting down over the past 18 years. A
    recent bailing by a staff accountant, that wasn't doing her job,left before year end stuff was done,
    and actually had left behind some very costly "ommissions" that made what is normally a tight
    financial time, quite stressful. A previously unknown tax break saved the day. Without that, I might
    be posting from the computer at the library. Events like the above take place daily in the corporate
    world, while self- centered employees(and consumers) go on oblivious.

    > BikeE's demise was not clear to me until the final day when it simply ran out of money. They made
    > payroll and had nothing left.

    Like that.

    > Bike dealers are, for the most part, wonderful people. But not all of them pay their bills. A few
    > because they're dishonest. Most because they've got cash problems like everyone else. BikeE was
    > also supposed to collect from a couple of component vendors that had been responsible for the
    > defects that caused the recalls. For whatever reson, that money did not come through and its
    > difficult to chase a debt in Taiwan..0

    Anyone who hasn't dealt with sub-contractors and suppliers may not recognize this problem, and I'm
    glad you brought it up. BikeE's staff didn't machine every little bolt, bracket, etc. I suppose the
    wheels were purchased already with spokes in place, and wheels were as I recall one of the sticky
    points. One might say that it is still BikeE's "fault" because they told the vendor how they wanted
    the parts. I know from my own experience that getting the vendor to actuaally build stuff the way
    you want it is often an uphill battle.

    >
    > I think it's unfair to characterize BikeE staff like this. They did not know that the end was
    > emminent. Sure, you can look back in hindsight now and say the indicators were clear.

    I agree, even though I wasn't there. As I mentioned above, business is often risky.

    >
    >But that's hindsight. BikeE's employees were trying to save their dream. They were caught between
    >creditors that wanted repayment--including me, a shortage of cash and a slow economy.
    >
    > To me, they behaved exactly as a good basketball team that is 20 points down with five minutes to
    > go. They didn't count failure as an option. If that's a crime, I'd be pleased to share a jail cell
    > with such people.

    Don't know what this means because I don't know(or care) about basketball, but assume it means
    keeping things working until the last moment.

    > Everyone is entitled to their own opiniuon. No one lost more from BikeE than I did. I miss those
    > dollars very much. But I also miss that another US manufacturer dropped away. I am sad that
    > several good people los ttheir jobs. And yeah, I feel badly for BikeE owners--which I am one of
    > as well.
    >
    > But I am not bitter and I am not angry. Life is about exploration and adventure. These cannot be
    > worthwhile without risk. I consider BikeE a valiant effort that ultimately failed, though my role
    > was only as an investor. My attentions are now on BiGHA. I am very glad to have the chance to
    > associate with everyone at BiGHA. I count as friends the people of BikeE as well. There's not one
    > of that I would not entrust my wallet to.
    >

    To me BikeE proved that one could make and sell lots of 'bents, and they made a substantial dent on
    the collective subconscious towards making "non- diamond frame bikes" more visible and mainstream.

    Thanks for giving a different perspective to the conversation.

    Happy trails to you and Bigha, rorschandt
     
  10. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    rorschandt wrote:
    > ... I am very "closely associated" with a biz owner, my S.O.,and it would probably surprise
    > employees if they knew how close and frequently the company has come to shutting down over the
    > past 18 years. A recent bailing by a staff accountant, that wasn't doing her job,left before year
    > end stuff was done, and actually had left behind some very costly "ommissions" that made what is
    > normally a tight financial time, quite stressful. A previously unknown tax break saved the day.
    > Without that, I might be posting from the computer at the library. Events like the above take
    > place daily in the corporate world, while self- centered employees(and consumers) go on
    > oblivious....

    Yes, life is hard for the CEOs of large corporations that make over 500 times the average wage of
    their hourly workers.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  11. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

    Tom Sherman <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    >
    > rorschandt wrote:
    >> ... I am very "closely associated" with a biz owner, my S.O.,and it would probably surprise
    >> employees if they knew how close and frequently the company has come to shutting down over the
    >> past 18 years. A recent bailing by a staff accountant, that wasn't doing her job,left before year
    >> end stuff was done, and actually had left behind some very costly "ommissions" that made what is
    >> normally a tight financial time, quite stressful. A previously unknown tax break saved the day.
    >> Without that, I might be posting from the computer at the library. Events like the above take
    >> place daily in the corporate world, while self- centered employees(and consumers) go on
    >> oblivious....
    >
    > Yes, life is hard for the CEOs of large corporations that make over 500 times the average wage of
    > their hourly workers.

    An excerpt from http://mnmn.essortment.com/buddhateachings_olg.htm

    > Life is so hard, how can we be anything but kind? You know your life isn’t easy—you live it every
    > day. But have you ever stopped to think that we as the human race are all in the same boat? No
    > matter if you have money, or friends, or a great job, you still probably think your life is
    > lacking something. Everyone feels that way. Your rich neighbor has marital problems; your happy
    > in-laws wish they had enough money to retire early.

    > Life is hard for everyone, and it is for that reason that we should live our lives with kindness
    > and compassion for everyone we encounter. The key isn’t how easy we can make our lives; it’s how
    > kind we can be while living our lives.

    namaste, rorschandt
     
  12. Buddhah is smiling upon you....BigHa/BuddHah hmmm say it ain't so
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    "rorschandt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tom Sherman <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > >
    > > rorschandt wrote:
    > >> ... I am very "closely associated" with a biz owner, my S.O.,and it would probably surprise
    > >> employees if they knew how close and frequently the company has come to shutting down over the
    > >> past 18 years. A recent bailing by a staff accountant, that wasn't doing her job,left before
    > >> year end stuff was done, and actually had left behind some very costly "ommissions" that made
    > >> what is normally a tight financial time, quite stressful. A previously unknown tax break saved
    > >> the day. Without that, I might be posting from the computer at the library. Events like the
    > >> above take place daily in the corporate world, while self- centered employees(and consumers) go
    > >> on oblivious....
    > >
    > > Yes, life is hard for the CEOs of large corporations that make over 500 times the average wage
    > > of their hourly workers.
    >
    > An excerpt from http://mnmn.essortment.com/buddhateachings_olg.htm
    >
    > > Life is so hard, how can we be anything but kind? You know your life isn't easy-you live it
    > > every day. But have you ever stopped to think that we as the human race are all in the same
    > > boat? No matter if you have money, or friends, or a great job, you still probably think your
    > > life is lacking something. Everyone feels that way. Your rich neighbor has
    marital
    > >problems; your happy in-laws wish they had enough money to retire early.
    >
    > > Life is hard for everyone, and it is for that reason that we should live our lives with kindness
    > > and compassion for everyone we encounter. The key isn't how easy we can make our lives; it's how
    > > kind we can be while
    living
    > >our lives.
    >
    >
    >
    > namaste, rorschandt
     
  13. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    Tom Sherman wrote:

    > Yes, life is hard for the CEOs of large corporations that make over 500 times the average wage of
    > their hourly workers.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

    Yeah, but most people work for small companies like what rorschandt described, and in any case BikeE
    was certainly not a large corporation.

    JR
     
  14. AAARGH, TOM!

    Executives (translation: leaders) identify, quantify and personalize goals and objectives, instill a
    sense of team and unity, provide direction and initiate greater action even from those who are
    self-starters. They inspire workers to take ownership of mutually beneficial tasks and work. Their
    leadership and focus increases productivity of the group far in excess of the monetary cost of the
    executive.

    I know because I was one. I was a very good executive and I accomplished the above many times in
    many places with many different groups over many years.

    --
    Gator Bob Siegel EasyRacers Ti Rush "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > rorschandt wrote:
    > > ... I am very "closely associated" with a biz owner, my S.O.,and it would probably surprise
    > > employees if they knew how close and frequently the company has come to shutting down over the
    > > past 18 years. A recent
    bailing
    > > by a staff accountant, that wasn't doing her job,left before year end
    stuff
    > > was done, and actually had left behind some very costly "ommissions"
    that
    > > made what is normally a tight financial time, quite stressful. A
    previously
    > > unknown tax break saved the day. Without that, I might be posting from
    the
    > > computer at the library. Events like the above take place daily in the corporate world, while
    self-
    > > centered employees(and consumers) go on oblivious....
    >
    > Yes, life is hard for the CEOs of large corporations that make over 500 times the average wage of
    > their hourly workers.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  15. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Robert Siegel wrote:
    >
    > AAARGH, TOM!
    >
    > Executives (translation: leaders) identify, quantify and personalize goals and objectives, instill
    > a sense of team and unity, provide direction and initiate greater action even from those who are
    > self-starters. They inspire workers to take ownership of mutually beneficial tasks and work. Their
    > leadership and focus increases productivity of the group far in excess of the monetary cost of the
    > executive....

    Robert,

    Why do top executives in the US get increasing large compensation, even when their companies are
    performing poorly? (In the largest corporate bankruptcies of the last couple of years, many the top
    executives have walked away with personal fortunes in the ten to hundreds of millions.) Why do top
    US executives get paid so much more than their workers in the US compared to those in Western Europe
    and Japan? There does not seem to be evidence that US corporate executives are that much better than
    their counterparts in other "First World" countries.

    In the past, I have worked for companies whose policies towards workers was to treat them as
    disposable commodities - work them as hard as possible for as little compensation as possible, and
    fire them when they get injured or worn out from working. [1]

    If you desire, we can discuss why unemployment and the lack of a social safety net are a good from
    an employer point of view, as these conditions allow greater exploitation of workers.

    [1] I still have chronic wrist and back problems from working at such jobs more than 10 years ago.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

    "Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps, for he is the only animal that is struck with the
    difference between what things are and what they ought to be," - William Hazlitt
     
  16. Well, in fairness I was not talking about CEO compensation and corporate governance. Both are
    definitely out of whack. So on that issue, I agree with you.

    I was talking about the vision, leadership, inspiration and motivation that effective leaders do
    contribute to make human enterprises work.

    P.S. I was NOT a CEO, for sure. ;-))
    --
    Gator Bob Siegel EasyRacers Ti Rush "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Robert Siegel wrote:
    > >
    > > AAARGH, TOM!
    > >
    > > Executives (translation: leaders) identify, quantify and personalize
    goals
    > > and objectives, instill a sense of team and unity, provide direction and initiate greater action
    > > even from those who are self-starters. They inspire workers to take ownership of mutually
    > > beneficial tasks and work. Their leadership and focus increases productivity of the group far in
    excess
    > > of the monetary cost of the executive....
    >
    > Robert,
    >
    > Why do top executives in the US get increasing large compensation, even when their companies are
    > performing poorly? (In the largest corporate bankruptcies of the last couple of years, many the
    > top executives have walked away with personal fortunes in the ten to hundreds of millions.) Why do
    > top US executives get paid so much more than their workers in the US compared to those in Western
    > Europe and Japan? There does not seem to be evidence that US corporate executives are that much
    > better than their counterparts in other "First World" countries.
    >
    > In the past, I have worked for companies whose policies towards workers was to treat them as
    > disposable commodities - work them as hard as possible for as little compensation as possible, and
    > fire them when they get injured or worn out from working. [1]
    >
    > If you desire, we can discuss why unemployment and the lack of a social safety net are a good from
    > an employer point of view, as these conditions allow greater exploitation of workers.
    >
    > [1] I still have chronic wrist and back problems from working at such jobs more than 10 years ago.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
    >
    > "Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps, for he is the only animal that is struck with the
    > difference between what things are and what they ought to be," - William Hazlitt
     
  17. Edward Wong

    Edward Wong Guest

    > Yes, life is hard for the CEOs of large corporations that make over 500 times the average wage of
    > their hourly workers.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

    That may be true if it's the CEO of Time Warner or Disney but not so of the CEO of a recumbent
    bicycle company where they must wear several hats, work long hours and sometimes go without a
    paycheck some weeks. If you don't believe me just ask Richard Ryan.

    Edward Wong Orlando, FL
     
  18. Edward Wong

    Edward Wong Guest

    [email protected] (john Acres) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    Mr. Acres,

    I want to thank you for the insightful post about your new company. If memory serves me right, you
    had stated that Bigha is not just a bicycle company but one that will specialize in producing and
    selling outdoor sports equipment. As you can see, there is a short attention span in this newsgroup
    and nobody who posted in this topic thread even bothered to mention that.

    Also there is much speculation mostly on the negative side about your new venture. Well my reply is
    that if anyone here in a.r.b.r. feels that they can do a better job at starting and running a
    recumbent bicycle company and making it profitable and have some cash to invest, then do so. Action
    speaks louder than words! All too often it's so easy to be an "armchair entreprenuer" and brag about
    how they would do this or how they would do that without the slightest notion about what they're
    talking about. Reality is different from fantasy and some "grown" men never mature enough to tell
    the difference.

    Ms. Acres I wish you the best of success and should the venture not prosper to your intitial
    expectations, it will NOT be because of any reasons anyone expounds in this newsgroup. Unforseen
    events can escape even the most astute business planner. I believe that with a solid but
    flexible business plan that takes into account numerous contingencies, adecuate capitalization,
    a well identified market, strong drive to succeed and FAITH, can increase the odds of winning on
    the entreprenuer's favor. Best wishes on your new company.

    Sincerely,

    Edward Wong Orlando, FL
     
  19. Nice letter, Ed. I thought much the same things you expressed when I read
    Mr. Acres obviously heartfelt letter. I wish him the best of luck.

    --
    Gator Bob Siegel EasyRacers Ti Rush "Edward Wong" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (john Acres) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > Mr. Acres,
    >
    > I want to thank you for the insightful post about your new company. If memory serves me right, you
    > had stated that Bigha is not just a bicycle company but one that will specialize in producing and
    > selling outdoor sports equipment. As you can see, there is a short attention span in this
    > newsgroup and nobody who posted in this topic thread even bothered to mention that.
    >
    > Also there is much speculation mostly on the negative side about your new venture. Well my reply
    > is that if anyone here in a.r.b.r. feels that they can do a better job at starting and running a
    > recumbent bicycle company and making it profitable and have some cash to invest, then do so.
    > Action speaks louder than words! All too often it's so easy to be an "armchair entreprenuer" and
    > brag about how they would do this or how they would do that without the slightest notion about
    > what they're talking about. Reality is different from fantasy and some "grown" men never mature
    > enough to tell the difference.
    >
    > Mr. Acres I wish you the best of success and should the venture not prosper to your intitial
    > expectations, it will NOT be because of any reasons anyone expounds in this newsgroup.
    > Unforseen events can escape even the most astute business planner. I believe that with a solid
    > but flexible business plan that takes into account numerous contingencies, adecuate
    > capitalization, a well identified market, strong drive to succeed and FAITH, can increase the
    > odds of winning on the entreprenuer's favor. Best wishes on your new company.
    >
    > Sincerely,
    >
    > Edward Wong Orlando, FL
     
  20. Skip

    Skip Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Yes, life is hard for the CEOs of large corporations that make over 500 times the average wage of
    > their hourly workers.

    Tom - You are going into re-runs. We know already.
     
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