Bike Bells Bill

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Steve McGinty, May 26, 2003.

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  1. I half heard Radio 5 Live doing a piece on this during the lunchtime show today. I note Guy's post
    on same from September 02

    http://tinyurl.com/col0

    Any updates/further views?

    Bells used to be compulsory in Northern Ireland, as I remember having to fit one to race there. As
    was the custom of the time lightness was all, so I took a drill to my bell which left the "ring"
    practically inaudible but induced a high pitched whistle at 25mph or so.

    Regards! Stephen
     
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  2. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Steve McGinty wrote:
    > I half heard Radio 5 Live doing a piece on this during the lunchtime show today. I note Guy's post
    > on same from September 02
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/col0
    >
    > Any updates/further views?
    >
    > Bells used to be compulsory in Northern Ireland, as I remember having to fit one to race there. As
    > was the custom of the time lightness was all, so I took a drill to my bell which left the "ring"
    > practically inaudible but induced a high pitched whistle at 25mph or so.

    It's only fitting at point of sale, rather than present at all times. Can't say I'm bothered much, I
    never found them much use but my Air Zound is altogether more fun.

    James
     
  3. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Steve McGinty <[email protected]_DOT_.com> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Bells used to be compulsory in Northern Ireland, as I remember having to fit one to race there. As
    > was the custom of the time lightness was all, so I took a drill to my bell which left the "ring"
    > practically inaudible but induced a high pitched whistle at 25mph or so.

    Did you weigh the bell on a scientific balance before and after taking a drill to it to know how
    much weight you'd saved? As I'm sure you are perfectly aware the minute weight saving was almost
    certainly not worth the extra aerodynamic drag. I wonder though whether the
    psychological edge of having minimised the weight overcame the physical losses of a whistling bell?

    --
    Dave...
     
  4. >Steve McGinty <[email protected]_DOT_.com> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>... perfectly aware the minute weight saving was
    >almost certainly not worth the extra aerodynamic drag. I wonder though whether the

    How about if you mounted the bell so that the dome pointed forward. Would this act like a very small
    fairing, I wonder?

    Love and ridiculous thoughts from Rich x

    --
    Two fish suddenly swim into a brick wall. Damn! To reply put only the word "richard" before
    the @ sign
     
  5. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Dave Kahn wrote:
    > I wonder though whether the
    > psychological edge of having minimised the weight overcame the physical losses of a
    > whistling bell?

    But you get bells *and* whistles all in a single package, which surely represents some sort
    of saving...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  6. John B

    John B Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:

    > >Steve McGinty <[email protected]_DOT_.com> wrote in message
    > >news:<[email protected]>... perfectly aware the minute weight saving was
    > >almost certainly not worth the extra aerodynamic drag. I wonder though whether the
    >
    > How about if you mounted the bell so that the dome pointed forward. Would this act like a very
    > small fairing, I wonder?

    Perhaps the UCI luddites can be encouraged to oppose the Bill.

    After all they are sure to ban such technological developments.

    John B
     
  7. SMH

    SMH New Member

    Joined:
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    I'm still trying to work out how bike bell bills get on a legislative agenda when they can't even pass a law to ban mobile phone use while driving.
     
  8. On 27 May 2003 01:27:45 -0700, [email protected] (Dave Kahn) wrote:

    >Steve McGinty <[email protected]_DOT_.com> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >> Bells used to be compulsory in Northern Ireland, as I remember having to fit one to race there.
    >> As was the custom of the time lightness was all, so I took a drill to my bell which left the
    >> "ring" practically inaudible but induced a high pitched whistle at 25mph or so.
    >
    >Did you weigh the bell on a scientific balance before and after taking a drill to it to know how
    >much weight you'd saved? As I'm sure you are perfectly aware the minute weight saving was almost
    >certainly not worth the extra aerodynamic drag. I wonder though whether the
    >psychological edge of having minimised the weight overcame the physical losses of a whistling bell?

    As I said, drilling everything was the fashion at the time, chain-rings, seat-posts. brake levers -
    it made cleaning your bike a nightmare - the amount of cotton buds it took to clean your
    chain-rings...

    Regards! Stephen
     
  9. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > But you get bells *and* whistles all in a single package, which surely represents some sort of
    > saving...

    LOL

    --
    Dave...
     
  10. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Richard Bates <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > How about if you mounted the bell so that the dome pointed forward. Would this act like a very
    > small fairing, I wonder?
    >
    > Love and ridiculous thoughts from Rich x
     
  11. On Tue, 27 May 2003 10:33:33 +0100, Peter Clinch
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Dave Kahn wrote:
    >> I wonder though whether the
    >> psychological edge of having minimised the weight overcame the physical losses of a whistling
    >> bell?
    >
    >But you get bells *and* whistles all in a single package, which surely represents some sort of
    >saving...
    >
    >Pete.
    Hmm.. anyone got a link for the Patents Office?

    Regards! Stephen
     
  12. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Richard Bates <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > How about if you mounted the bell so that the dome pointed forward. Would this act like a very
    > small fairing, I wonder?

    To make an effective fairing it would have to be a very big bell. I suppose it's only a matter of
    time before an enterprising time triallist fits a pinger to an aluminium fairing and tries to claim
    it as a bell. That should cause some head scratching among the officials. The bike ought to go like
    the clappers.

    :)

    --
    Dave...
     
  13. On Tue, 27 May 2003 13:46:12 +0100, Steve McGinty <[email protected]_DOT_.com> in
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>As I said, drilling everything was the fashion at the time, chain-rings, seat-posts. brake
    >>levers -
    >
    >Here's a pic to prove the point
    >
    >http://www.bikebrothers.co.uk/engers.htm

    Looks like he has even drilled a hole in his left leg!
    --
    Two fish suddenly swim into a brick wall. Damn! To reply put only the word "richard" before
    the @ sign
     
  14. John B

    John B Guest

    Steve McGinty wrote:As I said, drilling everything was the fashion at the time,

    > chain-rings, seat-posts. brake levers - it made cleaning your bike a nightmare - the amount of
    > cotton buds it took to clean your chain-rings...

    I've still got a set of those Zeus road cranks complete with three long slots in the crank arms and
    squillions of little holes over the chainrings.

    John B
     
  15. John B wrote:

    > I've still got a set of those Zeus road cranks complete with three long slots in the crank arms
    > and squillions of little holes over the chainrings.

    The tale is told of one Andy Pegg, the Flying Window Cleaner, who later acquired a certain amount of
    notoriety as works animal for Mike Burrows' Windcheetah posse, back in his native Yorkshire. With
    drilling and slotting and what-have-you being all the rage, Andy had carefully drilled and filed the
    fluted regions of his seat post, thereby replacing a substantial quantity thereof with Fresh Air
    (tm). Thus equipped, he turned out a for a regular club run. The ride leader cocked a suspicious eye
    at the Pegg's machine:

    Beryl Burton (for it was she): Bit o' rough stuff today, lads!

    By the end of the day, Andy's masterpiece had made like a concertina, and the saddle was a Several
    of inches closer to the top tube than was previously the case...

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  16. John B

    John B Guest

    Dave Larrington wrote:

    > John B wrote:
    >
    > > I've still got a set of those Zeus road cranks complete with three long slots in the crank arms
    > > and squillions of little holes over the chainrings.
    >
    > The tale is told of one Andy Pegg, the Flying Window Cleaner, who later acquired a certain amount
    > of notoriety as works animal for Mike Burrows' Windcheetah posse, back in his native Yorkshire.
    > With drilling and slotting and what-have-you being all the rage, Andy had carefully drilled and
    > filed the fluted regions of his seat post

    > By the end of the day, Andy's masterpiece had made like a concertina, and the saddle was a Several
    > of inches closer to the top tube than was previously the case...

    In the Engers years my brother did the same to an ordinary alloy pin which collapsed and broke off
    at the turn of a club '10', leaving a ragged perch. He crossed the finish line holding the saddle
    and remnants aloft, still winning the event in a short 24-something or other.

    He then had to ride the 15 miles home - also out of the saddle.

    Makes my eyes water thinking about it.

    I won't mention his using a 68 tooth drilled ring - on fixed too.

    John B
     
  17. John B

    John B Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:

    > On Tue, 27 May 2003 13:46:12 +0100, Steve McGinty <[email protected]_DOT_.com> in
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >>As I said, drilling everything was the fashion at the time, chain-rings, seat-posts. brake
    > >>levers -
    > >
    > >Here's a pic to prove the point
    > >
    > >http://www.bikebrothers.co.uk/engers.htm
    >
    > Looks like he has even drilled a hole in his left leg!

    Didn't he have his kneecaps removed, allegedly to save weight?

    And why do so many 'fast' riders have pointy noses <tries to stretch
    nose>?

    John B
     
  18. [email protected] (Dave Kahn) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > The bike ought to go like the clappers.
    >

    Do I detect a bell-ringing pun? ;-)

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  19. John B <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > In the Engers years my brother did the same to an ordinary alloy pin which collapsed and broke off
    > at the turn of a club '10', leaving a ragged perch. He crossed the finish line holding the saddle
    > and remnants aloft, still winning the event in a short 24-something or other.
    >
    > He then had to ride the 15 miles home - also out of the saddle.
    >
    > Makes my eyes water thinking about it.
    >
    > I won't mention his using a 68 tooth drilled ring - on fixed too.
    >

    Seem to recall reading somewhere (think it was an interview with framebuilder Ken Bird) that Alf
    Engers himself used a plastic (prob. Nylon or Delrin??) headset to save weight - apparently they
    were absolute pigs, and prone to seizing up. Still, during that era, if you got bored with TTing you
    could always use the bike as a cheese grater ;-)

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
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