Bike Chain Lube

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by jayson, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. jayson

    jayson Guest

    What's the preferred lube- I was previously using a silicone spray
    which I liked but then switched to ProLink because I thought it might
    do a better job. Unfortunately the ProLink is a dirt magnet much like
    WD 40. Thanks...
     
    Tags:


  2. jayson schrieb:
    > What's the preferred lube- I was previously using a silicone spray
    > which I liked but then switched to ProLink because I thought it might
    > do a better job. Unfortunately the ProLink is a dirt magnet much like
    > WD 40. Thanks...

    The best chain lube produtcs I have ever used are from Finish Line,
    silicon spray isn't a good choice for a bike chain, WD 40 is a good
    choice for chainsaws ;-)
    http://www.finishlineusa.com/
     
  3. ?? I've used ProLink for years, and it is one of the cleanest lubes
    around. Normal application technique: clean chain, apply lube, rotate
    cranks backwards for a few minutes, wipe off the excess. Maybe you
    aren't wiping the chain clean after applying?

    It's also best to lube your chain after a ride - not before - so that
    the lube can sit overnight. Most lubes these days are some actual
    lubricant (like oil) in a carrier (like mineral spirits). It's thin
    when you apply it, and penetrates to the inside of the chain; then the
    carrier evaporates, leaving just the lube where you need it. If you
    give it time to evaporate it will stay where it should. Any lube left
    on the outside of the chain is useless; it's what gets inside the links
    that counts.
     
  4. Steve knight

    Steve knight Guest

    if you want a dry lube about the driest I have found is honda's chain
    lube. it is a spray it dries very fast and hardly attracts anything.
    but it does not last more then a couple hundred miles so you have to
    apply it often. what little black gets on the chain does not come off
    easily so it does not get on your legs or hands much.
    Knight-Toolworks
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com
    affordable handmade wooden planes
     
  5. jayson

    jayson Guest

    On 28 Sep 2005 06:39:01 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >?? I've used ProLink for years, and it is one of the cleanest lubes
    >around. Normal application technique: clean chain, apply lube, rotate
    >cranks backwards for a few minutes, wipe off the excess. Maybe you
    >aren't wiping the chain clean after applying?
    >
    >It's also best to lube your chain after a ride - not before - so that
    >the lube can sit overnight. Most lubes these days are some actual
    >lubricant (like oil) in a carrier (like mineral spirits). It's thin
    >when you apply it, and penetrates to the inside of the chain; then the
    >carrier evaporates, leaving just the lube where you need it. If you
    >give it time to evaporate it will stay where it should. Any lube left
    >on the outside of the chain is useless; it's what gets inside the links
    >that counts.


    Apply after the ride- I'm going to try that...thanks.
     
  6. I found out that Sram uses Gleitmo 582E as their lube for their chains which
    is not available to the U.S. consumer. Don Brazen (cyclist) from one of the
    Gleitmo distributors here in the U.S. is trying to bring it to the states
    for distribution as a bicycle chain lube. I'll post if it ever happens.
    -tom
     
  7. valvoline 100% synthetic transmission oil cut 2-1 with paint thinner
    (cold weather) or straight if that's you're thing at 110 degress
    or for the epic cure cut the valvo synth with finish line
     
  8. richard

    richard Guest

    WD-40 is a solvent, not a lube!

    You're not using Prolink correctly (I once had the same impression):

    1. CLEAN your chain(!). Old, other-branded lubes + Prolink make a
    serious mess

    2. Drip Prolink on each roller, then back-pedal a few times

    3. Gently give it a quick wipe

    4. Let the thing dry overnight

    5. Give it a more thorough wipe

    6. If you're not satisfied with your results, be sure to give your chain
    a thorough cleaning! (See step 1)

    jayson wrote:
    > What's the preferred lube- I was previously using a silicone spray
    > which I liked but then switched to ProLink because I thought it might
    > do a better job. Unfortunately the ProLink is a dirt magnet much like
    > WD 40. Thanks...
     
  9. Per [email protected]:
    >valvoline 100% synthetic transmission oil


    What is it about trans oil that makes it preferable to motor oil?

    Viscosity?
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  10. Fintone

    Fintone Guest

    "(PeteCresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Per [email protected]:
    >>valvoline 100% synthetic transmission oil

    >
    > What is it about trans oil that makes it preferable to motor oil?
    >
    > Viscosity?
    > --
    > PeteCresswell


    Gee, it seems clear to me, the chain is part of the transmission, you are
    the motor ;)

    Dave
    Noblesville IN
     
  11. Bruce Graham

    Bruce Graham Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Per [email protected]:
    > >valvoline 100% synthetic transmission oil

    >
    > What is it about trans oil that makes it preferable to motor oil?
    >
    > Viscosity?
    >

    Motor oil has up to 25% additives - including lots of detergent to remove
    watery sludge from combustion byproducts. I don't believe gear oil has
    that stuff, but may usually has a small quantity of (smally) extreme
    pressure additives.

    In my experience motor oil (including synthetic) makes the chain go black
    very quickly, some say that means it is doing its job, I think it is the
    detergent working on the water in the mud.
     
  12. Kenny

    Kenny Guest

    I switched to sewing machine oil. I was shocked at how well it works. A
    hell of a lot better than that synthetic lube with Teflon in it. My
    chain doesn't attract as much road grit as before and it runs quieter
    too. And to top it all off, it's dirt cheap too.
     
  13. (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > Per [email protected]:
    > >valvoline 100% synthetic transmission oil

    >
    > What is it about trans oil that makes it preferable to motor oil?
    >
    > Viscosity?
    > --
    > PeteCresswell


    There are lots of arguments and I've been an ATF user for years.. for
    me it has to do with the various additives in ATF..

    Assuming the viscosity is what you want in a chain oil then ATF is a
    better choice than a regular oil because..1) there are additives in ATF
    to seriously decrease volatility, so it dries off your chain
    significantly more slowly than a regular oil of similar viscosity. 2)
    Other Additives improve dispersancy(sp), ATF will hold contaminates in
    suspension far better than a regular oil of similar viscosity. 3) There
    are also additives to improve detergency, it will keep parts cleaner,
    and make cleaning easier than a regular oil (it appears to clean off
    clothes and skin easier as well).

    As a little story.. my old beater MTB once an '88 Miyata Ridge Runner
    sat unused in the yard for a couple of years before being stolen, 5
    months later I was able to recover it .. it had been badly abused in
    the interval. The chain was dry but not at all rusty and after a shot
    of ATF worked as smoothly as when it was put on the bike years ago.
     
  14. Geezer Boy

    Geezer Boy Guest

    On Wed, 28 Sep 2005 13:15:12 GMT, jayson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >What's the preferred lube- I was previously using a silicone spray
    >which I liked but then switched to ProLink because I thought it might
    >do a better job. Unfortunately the ProLink is a dirt magnet much like
    >WD 40. Thanks...



    Buy a gallon of chain saw bar oil at WalMart or hardware store. It's
    cheap stuff.

    Cut about half a cup of it with a half cup of acetone or lacquer
    thinner -- roughly 50% and shake or stir thoroughly. It should be
    quite thin and flow easily, but not as low viscosity as water.

    Dip chain in it or if chain must stay on the bike (less desirable for
    chain lubing), drip or brush it (quicker and more thorough than
    dripping) on so that it fully penetrates each link plate, both sides,
    and rollers. Be generous with it.

    Let dry about ten minutes (the acetone or lacquer thinner solvent will
    evaporate) and wipe sides and rollers with clean rag. Chain saw bar
    oil is much better than motor oil, whether synthetic or regular. It is
    made for the purpose but for more severe conditions than on a bike.
    BTW, bar oil viscosity is 30 weight and rather thick. If you are going
    to remove the chain and do a chain soak overnight, there's no need to
    thin it for better penetration.

    Nothing wrong with regular or synthetic motor oil, but why not use the
    best for the purpose?

    Geezer Boy
     
  15. jayson wrote:
    > What's the preferred lube- I was previously using a silicone spray
    > which I liked but then switched to ProLink because I thought it might
    > do a better job. Unfortunately the ProLink is a dirt magnet much like
    > WD 40. Thanks...


    This subject comes up about twice per year. Search the archives for
    interminable discussions.

    But, since most other chain unctions have been mentioned, I'll mention
    mine: Hot paraffin wax with about 5% oil blended in. Attracts _very_
    little dirt and lasts a long time. The oil blended in lets it work
    well in rain, too.

    Careful use of a propane torch will allow you to apply it with the
    chain still on the bike. Crayon it on, heat till it flows, wipe off
    excess.

    - Frank Krygowski
     
  16. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Geezer Boy wrote:

    > On Wed, 28 Sep 2005 13:15:12 GMT, jayson <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> What's the preferred lube- I was previously using a silicone spray
    >> which I liked but then switched to ProLink because I thought it might
    >> do a better job. Unfortunately the ProLink is a dirt magnet much
    >> like WD 40. Thanks...

    >
    >
    > Buy a gallon of chain saw bar oil at WalMart or hardware store. It's
    > cheap stuff.
    >
    > Cut about half a cup of it with a half cup of acetone or lacquer
    > thinner -- roughly 50% and shake or stir thoroughly. It should be
    > quite thin and flow easily, but not as low viscosity as water.
    >
    > Dip chain in it or if chain must stay on the bike (less desirable for
    > chain lubing), drip or brush it (quicker and more thorough than
    > dripping) on so that it fully penetrates each link plate, both sides,
    > and rollers. Be generous with it.
    >
    > Let dry about ten minutes (the acetone or lacquer thinner solvent will
    > evaporate) and wipe sides and rollers with clean rag. Chain saw bar
    > oil is much better than motor oil, whether synthetic or regular. It is
    > made for the purpose but for more severe conditions than on a bike.
    > BTW, bar oil viscosity is 30 weight and rather thick. If you are going
    > to remove the chain and do a chain soak overnight, there's no need to
    > thin it for better penetration.
    >
    > Nothing wrong with regular or synthetic motor oil, but why not use the
    > best for the purpose?


    Phil Wood Tenacious Oil is pretty much the same thing, a repackaged chainsaw bar
    oil. I've been using it too for years, but I wouldn't say it's the best. It
    makes big gooey strings between the chain and sprockets, which get all over the
    rest of the bike. The extra oil on the sprockets, particularly the jockey
    wheels, attracts dirt and is a pain to keep clean. It gets all over the rear
    rim too.

    So why do I use it? Nothing works better for my suspension fork. Since I have
    it on hand for that, I use it for everything else. It works fine but it's messy
    .. A plain oil -- motor oil, ATF, gear oil, machine oil, etc. -- without the
    plasticizers -- would be better for the chain.

    I definately prefer oil to waxy lubes though. I've had good luck with Pedro's
    Extra Dry and Boeshield, but plain oil always makes for a quieter, smoother
    shifting drivetrain. On group rides I usually have the quietest bike, despite
    the fat aluminum tubes. Everyone else is grinding and squeaking.

    Matt O.
     
  17. valvo synthetic trans oil-
    in commutng 5000 per year or more the epic costs are well epic and
    worse running out of the mo epic leeds to the LBS where prices for 4oz
    go upupup.
    enter the valvo at half price full strength
    full strengtth is useable at road temps of 110 and above. better than
    epic.
    as the temp goes down cut it with thinner-ut it in half!! a small
    portion at a time please. 1/5 at 75 degrees works lubrously.
    sheldon brown sez the trans oil attracts dirt but it also keeps dirt
    floating on the exterior where it can be cleaned off using short maint
    intervals.
    surprise-its more or less odorless-wals' smells like kendall. this is
    not good.
    another fact-the anti foaming agents keep the valvo on the chain not on
    the rim. this is amazing.
    i complained abt epic running onto the rim but was soundly advised that
    excrescence was the result of dripping too much epic: i suppose that's
    inevitabley true.
    if the synth is cut with thinner then anti foaming is reduced?
    one suggestion-replace the top foil. remove carefully, replace under
    cap, the use a rod to gently push it out when decanting another batch.
    the bottles are gravity intolerant.
     
  18. C Wright

    C Wright Guest

    It is somewhat surprising that in these chain lube threads hardly anyone
    ever mentions the wax type chain lubes. Does anyone use these; is there
    something that makes them not worth recommending?
    Chuck
     
  19. C Wright wrote:
    > It is somewhat surprising that in these chain lube threads hardly
    > anyone ever mentions the wax type chain lubes. Does anyone use
    > these; is there something that makes them not worth recommending?
    > Chuck



    Since you ask ;)
    I use wax on my roadbike and don't really understand why people make such a
    fuzz about different kind of oil when oil clearly is not necessary. I rewax
    when I come home from a rainy ride, that's about it. I use White Lightning.

    --
    Perre
    I gave up on SPAM and redirected it to hotmail instead.
     
  20. On 29 Sep 2005 08:30:46 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >This subject comes up about twice per year. Search the archives for
    >interminable discussions.


    Don't you mean per month?


    Jasper
     
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