Bike cleaning and care.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Cheryl, Jan 23, 2006.

  1. Cheryl

    Cheryl Guest

    Hi Guys

    I'm after wisdom again!

    I am thoroughly looking forward to collecting my new MTB on Friday but
    am wondering if my current care and attention techniques are any good,
    not wanting to damage the new bike!

    I currently hose the bike after every ride (normal hose not pressure
    washer), kinda drip dry and then dose the moving bits with bog
    standard 3 in 1 oil.

    I'm wondering if new fangled spray lubricants and chain waxes and de
    gunk de grease etc etc wotsits are just a drain on the money or if
    they're actually any good/better than my 3 in 1?

    Advice welcomed

    Cheryl
     
    Tags:


  2. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Cheryl wrote:
    > Hi Guys
    >
    > I'm after wisdom again!
    >
    > I am thoroughly looking forward to collecting my new MTB on Friday but
    > am wondering if my current care and attention techniques are any good,
    > not wanting to damage the new bike!


    Part of it depends on what kind of riding you do and what kind of
    priorities you have. When I was younger and had more free time I'd
    strip the bike down and clean it to within an inch of it's life. Now it
    barely gets a wipe now and then, the occasional drip of oil on a chain.

    > I currently hose the bike after every ride (normal hose not pressure
    > washer), kinda drip dry and then dose the moving bits with bog
    > standard 3 in 1 oil.



    I'm no great fan of 3 in 1. It tends to dry in a claggy mess. I much
    prefer motor oil. A 'left over' dribble when filling up the car goes a
    long way.

    > I'm wondering if new fangled spray lubricants and chain waxes and de
    > gunk de grease etc etc wotsits are just a drain on the money or if
    > they're actually any good/better than my 3 in 1?


    Yes they are better. But it depends on what you want to do. If you are
    after a performance lubricant that you are prepared to replace after
    every ride then there aresome that will do that. There are others which
    barely need touching but are better at picking up gunge.

    Personal recommendation is, if you do wash the bike, to immediately
    spray moving parts (brake callipers/arms, gears, chain) with a water
    displacing fluid such as WD40 or GT85.
    Then lubricate with your lubricant of choice. There will be many other
    recommendations but I use bog standard clean motor oil on the chain,
    and a standard car bearing grease for hubs.

    It aslo goes that you should use water displacement and lubrication
    after riding in the rain.

    I tried Pedros bio friendly degreaser the other day and it seems very
    good, especially with a bucket of hot water. Now that bike is clean I
    must do the MTB..

    ...d
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Cheryl wrote:
    > I currently hose the bike after every ride (normal hose not pressure
    > washer), kinda drip dry and then dose the moving bits with bog
    > standard 3 in 1 oil.


    Even a dribbly low pressure hose can get water into the bearings (I've
    been there done that), so be careful. Safer is a bucket and sponge.

    > I'm wondering if new fangled spray lubricants and chain waxes and de
    > gunk de grease etc etc wotsits are just a drain on the money or if
    > they're actually any good/better than my 3 in 1?


    Finish Line Cross Country is certainly better for chains than 3-in-1.
    (I'm a recent convert; thanks to everyone here for recommending it
    previously). White spirit is good for celaning chains.

    Only minimal lubrication is needed elsewhere (externally). I find "multi
    purpose" oil is OK for caliper brakes and derailleurs. Unless they have
    "ports" you can't lubricate hubs and headset from the outside.

    ~PB
     
  4. Brian G

    Brian G Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    > Cheryl wrote:
    >> I currently hose the bike after every ride (normal hose not pressure
    >> washer), kinda drip dry and then dose the moving bits with bog
    >> standard 3 in 1 oil.


    > Finish Line Cross Country is certainly better for chains than 3-in-1.
    > (I'm a recent convert; thanks to everyone here for recommending it
    > previously). White spirit is good for celaning chains.


    I use Cross Country in the winter months and in the summer I use White
    Lightning Epic which is a lighter lube and less inclined to attract gunk.


    --
    Brian G
     
  5. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Cheryl
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Hi Guys
    >
    > I'm after wisdom again!
    >
    > I am thoroughly looking forward to collecting my new MTB on Friday but
    > am wondering if my current care and attention techniques are any good,
    > not wanting to damage the new bike!
    >
    > I currently hose the bike after every ride (normal hose not pressure
    > washer), kinda drip dry and then dose the moving bits with bog
    > standard 3 in 1 oil.


    It's better if you can put a soft brush attachment on the end of the
    hose, although MTB bearings should be reasonably protected against water
    ingress. I don't like 3in1; the volatiles evaporate leaving a sticky
    gunge. Finish Line Cross Country is a very good lubricant for mountain
    bike conditions. If you are really using it as a mountain bike (i.e.
    getting it filthy and/or dusty), taking the chain off the bike and
    cleaning it thoroughly and re-lubricating it every few rides is a good
    idea.

    Don't over lubricate! Wipe all excess lubricant off the chain before
    putting it back on the bike, and lubricate everything else /very/
    sparingly. Too much lubricant just gives grit and dust something to
    stick to and makes matters worse.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Woz: 'All the best people in life seem to like LINUX.'
    ;; <URL:http://www.woz.org/woz/cresponses/response03.html>
     
  6. Eatmorepies

    Eatmorepies Guest

    !
    >
    > I am thoroughly looking forward to collecting my new MTB on Friday but
    > am wondering if my current care and attention techniques are any good,
    > not wanting to damage the new bike!
    >
    > I currently hose the bike after every ride (normal hose not pressure
    > washer), kinda drip dry and then dose the moving bits with bog
    > standard 3 in 1 oil.
    >
    > I'm wondering if new fangled spray lubricants and chain waxes and de
    > gunk de grease etc etc wotsits are just a drain on the money or if
    > they're actually any good/better than my 3 in 1?


    Assuming you use the bike as a MTB and get it good and muddy.

    A good washing to remove the mud. I use a cheap pressure washer (£30) which
    has poor pressure compared with an expensive pressure washer but does shift
    dirt off rims/tyres/chain/non-bearing bits. When washing mud off more
    senstive places I just pull the lance back a bit.

    A wash over with Muc-Off. I buy a big bottle (5 Lt.) from that nice Mr
    Nelson for about £17, an eggcup full or two in a jam jar is enough. I brush
    it on with a cheap 1 inch paint brush, having a bit of a rub/stipple where
    dirt has stuck. Then rinse off. The water from the initial wash dilutes the
    Muc-Off and makes it go further - hence it's cheap to use.

    I then bounce the bike on the ground a bit. Inertial water removal. A bit of
    a spray with GT84 (or WD40) on cogs, gear bits and pedals to displace the
    rest of the water from the sensitive bits. Then put your GT85 nozzle into
    your gear pods and blow them dry. That nice Mr Nelson shudders a bit when I
    tell him I do this as he likes to use a Shimano product for gear pods. My XT
    pods have survived 5 years of this treatment.

    The chain; GT85 to dispel water. Then chain saw oil. As any oil I put on my
    chain probably only lasts the first couple of mud baths in the Abergwesyn
    forestry this is possibly a mute point. However I only paid £3.5 for the
    gallon of chain saw oil so I imagine I shall be leaving a pint or two of it
    to some lucky relative. It's very good value.

    Head set and hubs. There is no substitute for dropping the forks down every
    month and squirting a bit of fresh grease into the headset. Hubs? Depends on
    which hubs you have. Deore hubs do need stripping every winter month or so
    to get fresh grease in. XT hubs don't, I greased my XT rear after a year and
    it really didn't need it - I was pleasantly suprised. Hope hubs appear to
    the lazy rider's dream. I put a front Hope hub on in 2001 and it's still
    perfect.

    I could have cleaned my bike in the time it's taken to type this message -
    hope it helps.

    John
     
  7. > I'm wondering if new fangled spray lubricants and chain waxes and de
    > gunk de grease etc etc wotsits are just a drain on the money or if
    > they're actually any good/better than my 3 in 1?


    Take chain off (powerlink or similar saves a bit of faff) chuck in coke
    bottle with degreaser (Halfords or B&Q etc), shake. Take chain out and
    refit, put on chainsaw oil, wipe off excess.

    The rest is either LBS to replace cables and re-grease stuff, or do it
    myself. Never bothered with either yet, but then I've only just got a bike
    that's worth spending money on.

    As for the frame, leave it dirty. With dirty, obv much used kit, you need
    to prove nothing. With shiny spangly kit you've set yourself up for a fall
    - never underestimate a CTC shark on his stripped down Galaxy.
     
  8. As for the frame, leave it dirty. With dirty, obv much used kit, you
    need
    to prove nothing. With shiny spangly kit you've set yourself up for a
    fall

    It just gets dirty again.I only clean mine a bit when they get
    ridiculously grimy, or before putting them in a bag for the car.
    And there is a lot to be said for getting it scratched nice and early
    so that you can just get on and enjoy riding it without worrying.
    Hose off the mud, maybe a big brush for thick mud, choiuce of lube is
    not critical, I use sprays and motor oil because i have not noticed any
    advantage with others, but icbw.
    Pressure washing I have had trouble with in the bearings.
    terryJ
     
  9. adam bootle

    adam bootle Guest

    You didn't mention what bike you are getting Cheryl, but just so I can state
    the obvious, if it has disk brakes don't go near the hubs with spray
    lubricant.

    As for the rest, I'm pretty much with everyone else on the cleaning side,
    chain off using powerlink (cleaned same way as Marks) but I alternate 2
    identical chains, rest of bike washed with warm soapy water, a couple of
    different brushes, rinse with low powered hose, GT 85 a few places and thats
    about it.

    One thing I did do when I first got my bike is put some think clear vinyl
    tape along the bottom of the downtube and the side of the headtube where the
    cables and hoses rub. Plus I got some small cable ties and cable tied a
    portion of old innertube to the chainstay in case of chainslap.

    Happy riding ..........Adam
     
  10. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    Mark Thompson wrote:

    >> I'm wondering if new fangled spray lubricants and chain waxes and de
    >> gunk de grease etc etc wotsits are just a drain on the money or if
    >> they're actually any good/better than my 3 in 1?

    >
    >Take chain off (powerlink or similar saves a bit of faff) chuck in coke
    >bottle with degreaser (Halfords or B&Q etc), shake. Take chain out and
    >refit, put on chainsaw oil, wipe off excess.


    When I tried that it got the chain wonderfully clean but I had to
    destroy the bottle to get it out as the chain folded over itself and
    the loop wouldn't come out of the bottle.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  11. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Phil Cook wrote:
    > Mark Thompson wrote:


    >> Take chain off (powerlink or similar saves a bit of faff) chuck in
    >> coke bottle with degreaser (Halfords or B&Q etc),


    or white spirit

    >> shake. Take chain
    >> out and refit, put on chainsaw oil, wipe off excess.

    >
    > When I tried that it got the chain wonderfully clean but I had to
    > destroy the bottle to get it out as the chain folded over itself and
    > the loop wouldn't come out of the bottle.


    A nomal-length chain fits in a jam jar.

    ~PB
     
  12. adam bootle

    adam bootle Guest

    I put a hooked piece of wire through one end of the chain for getting it out
    of the degreaser, then rinse with water, and then oil the chain by coiling
    it and laying it in a shallow tin with a few mm of lube (halfords stuff) and
    brush it onto both sides of the chain and thern hang it above the lid to
    allow excess to drip off until I'm ready to fit onto bike during next chain
    swap and clean.

    Works for me ! Adam
     
  13. > When I tried that it got the chain wonderfully clean but I had to
    > destroy the bottle to get it out as the chain folded over itself and
    > the loop wouldn't come out of the bottle.


    I suggest using an empty beer bottle. Replacing the bottle each time then
    becomes a non-issue.
     
  14. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Mark Thompson wrote:
    >> When I tried that it got the chain wonderfully clean but I had to
    >> destroy the bottle to get it out as the chain folded over itself and
    >> the loop wouldn't come out of the bottle.

    >
    > I suggest using an empty beer bottle. Replacing the bottle each time then
    > becomes a non-issue.


    I use a large glass jam jar. Nice wide neck and almost infinitely reusable.

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  15. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    On Wed, 25 Jan 2006 20:10:29 -0000,
    adam bootle <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > I put a hooked piece of wire through one end of the chain for getting it out
    > of the degreaser, then rinse with water, and then oil the chain by coiling
    > it and laying it in a shallow tin with a few mm of lube (halfords stuff) and
    > brush it onto both sides of the chain and thern hang it above the lid to
    > allow excess to drip off until I'm ready to fit onto bike during next chain
    > swap and clean.
    >
    > Works for me ! Adam
    >

    But don't forget to oil the chain straight after you have cleaned and
    dried it. Otherwise you will return to find a siezed bar of rust when
    you come to swap your chain.

    (I totally immerse my chains in chainsaw oil and then hang them up to
    dry. They can hang for months even in a damp shed without going rusty
    so long as you remember the oiling step)

    Tim.

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t,"
    and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
Loading...
Loading...