bike for a clydesdale

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by huskies91, Feb 4, 2007.

  1. huskies91

    huskies91 New Member

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    I'm 5'11 and 225. Looking to purchase a road bike in the $1500 range. What is good? I want comfort and performance. Please recommend a decent brand. thank you

    Beau
     
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  2. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    Comfort and performance? If your definition of performance is speed and handling agility, then they really are diametrically opposite criteria. :D

    Or it'll be a balance b/n the two.
     
  3. huskies91

    huskies91 New Member

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    OK, let me say, I prefer a comfortable ride and don't plan on breaking any records. I've been told carbon and/or steel is best for comfort but not sure if any of the models that some of you may know are best for heavyweights. Wheel combos for the heavy guys also.
     
  4. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    For weight, consider a brand that gives you lifetime warranty on the frame.
     
  5. Mike1970

    Mike1970 New Member

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    Hi,

    When I returned to cycling I was pretty heavey. I opted for a hybred bike. It was great and I still ahve it. You can go long distances and have no discomfort. Great touring bike. Trek has a few nice bike's. The money you save with the hybred can go into toy's for the bike and yourself. ( Bike computer, riding shorts, jersey's, Helmet, shades, gloves, Tools, Camelback ETC.....). Or get a Cervelo Soloist. It's what I bought and I stand 6'3 and around 215. The bike has been solid. Really fast and climbs like a mountain goat. You just have to find one on sale.


    Mike
     
  6. RickF

    RickF New Member

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    At 225 pounds most road bikes within your price range will work. The problems with rider weight and the bike's ability to withstand it are in the high-end bikes, where 185 to 195 pounds seems to be the upper limit. The lower-end bikes have heavier frames and wheels with more spokes, and are fine for riders up to 235 to 250 pounds. I ride with a fellow who is about 250 pounds and has a Trek 1000. He has had no problems with his weight and that bike.

    Within your price range, though, you are going to be limited to aluminum frames or aluminum with carbon seat stays. Full carbon bikes start around $1900, and there are very few steel bikes other than the custom bikes, which are well out of your price range.

    When I was 265 pounds, I road a Specialized Crossroads Elite (aluminum hybrid). when I reached 200 pounds, I treated myself to a Specialized Roubaix Elite (carbon fiber). I found both bikes to be comfortable, but the Roubaix is certainly more nimble. I can pretty much manage the same top speed on either bike, but there is a big difference in how long it takes to get to that speed. On 20 to 40 mile rides, I can average about 3 mph faster on the Roubaix than on the Crossroads.

    I still use the Crossroads for light off-road rides, like our local rails-to-trails route. I also plan to use it this year when I am leading beginner rides, where the average pace is expected to be less than 13 mph, and the distance is less than 25 miles. For everything else, I much prefer the Roubaix.
     
  7. geo8rge

    geo8rge New Member

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    Paying extra for a light weight frame does not make sense unless you are light weight. I would suggest you get a steel frame and put the extra money in the mechanical areas of the bike. For example Phil Wood hubs/BB (low maintenance/excellent performance). Brooks saddle.

    You could even build a bike around a vintage frame like a Pugeot PX-10, or Schwinn Paramount. A vintage bike would take extra work but would impress others for a relatively small expense.

    If you would consider a folding bike, Bike Friday, Xooter Swift, or Dahon Mu might work for you as a road bike.
     
  8. wiredued

    wiredued New Member

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    Comfort has more to do with sizing I am 6' 1.5" tall and ride a 59 cm frame (Chromoly steel yes it gives a good ride and it is strong aluminum is stiffer due to the thicker walled tubing) road bike center of crank to top of seat tube that is a race fit for me (seat 2 inches higher than handlebars) if I wanted more comfort I would get 61cm or 62cm. You are 5' 11 so 59cm or 60 cm might be comfortable for you it's nice to test ride differrent frames because a 60cm Cannondale feels bigger than a 60cm Fuji due to other geometry factors. If you want a work horse bike I would get the Jamis Aurora http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/bikes/07_bikes/aurora.html it is also good for touring. MTBs are ussually sized in inches I have a comfortable MTB frame it is 22 inches you will probably like 21 inches for a MTB. The upright position causes pesky wind resistance problems expect to be 3mph slower on a MTB or hybrid. As far as brands go I'm sure you are familiar with reliable brands but they are just names the frames are ussually from China or Tiawan so look a little deeper at components which can vary greatly. I have STI shifters (sweet) part of the Shimano Sora components on my road bike I am happy with but I wouldn't go any cheaper than that.
     
  9. otb4evr

    otb4evr New Member

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    I have had several aluminum bikes, because I thought that was the only kind that I could have, being 225+. These were stable, but rather harsh. You get used to it...

    My current bike is a Giant TCR2 Carbon. I love it. I also paid ~1500 on sale.

    Very comfortable and, yes, great performance. Gee, you can have both.

    Not only do I train on it, I race on it as a competitive Cat 3...at 220 pounds.

    The only thing that I have changed is the wheels. I like the security of a 3-cross wheelset. However, I do have a set of Rolfs that I have used for several years.

    My advice to you, however, is to find a bike that fits you and that you can afford. The current models of bikes can more than handle your weight.

    Good Luck

    Jim
     
  10. QCTony

    QCTony New Member

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    I', 6' 1" and weigh 260 pounds and ride a Trek 2100. I put on 4753 miles last year. I do endurance cycling. While any quality carbon or aluminum frame will work. I would suggest a frame with an aluminum front triangle with carbon stays and fork. The aluminum gives you the stiffness your weight needs. While the carbon gives you some flex to make the ride smoother. I'll be getting my next bike in a couple of weeks. I decided on an Orbea Vuelta. This is in you price range. I would also look at the Orbea Volata. The Trek 1500 would be a good choice too. Scott, Bianchi, and Cannondale have good bikes in this price range too.
     
  11. Bikelyst

    Bikelyst New Member

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    I tend to disagree...there are new lines of comfort rode bikes out there with a longer wheel base that are meant both for speed and comfort.

    i.e. Bianchi Via Nirone '07 and Specialized Roubaix
     
  12. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    How can you have top end handling agility if the wheelbase is longer?
     
  13. Bikelyst

    Bikelyst New Member

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    You can't, that's the thing...but these two bikes balance between a long wheel base and speed. Granted the wheel bases won't be as short as say a Giant 0CR but not as long as a touring bike. And thats what the op is looking for...i think.
     
  14. barndoor

    barndoor New Member

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    I am 6' 2" and have riden a Klein Quantum for years, I am switching to the Burley steel road bike with the ultegra 10, I think iit is the fox hollow or pine grove I can't remember, My weight is 252 and I will put the Kysyrium ssl on and have no problems. I know burley is no longer making road bikes so you might fine one in you price range, its a great bike
     
  15. dekindy

    dekindy New Member

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    If you are willing to go direct and work with them on sizing and do some assembly or have your LBS do it, take a look at these.

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/immortalpro_instock.htm
    You can read the reviews on www.roadbikereview.com and decide if you want to keep the wheels. There are some heavy riders that have had good luck with the AC320's.
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/immortalforce_instock.htm
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/lechamp06pre.htm
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/lechamp07_sl_preorders.htm
    http://bikesdirect.com/products/mercier/mercier_serpens2006.htm
    Great deal on a steel bike.

    http://www.leaderbikestore.com/pd_ld_796r2.cfm

    http://www.ibexbikes.com/Stacks/Series_Aprisa.html

    Most of these bikes have user reviews on www.roadbikereview.com

    I have purchased all my bikes retail. A triathlete acquaintenance did not have experience cycling made his first purchase from BikesDirect and got a great deal and is very happy.
     
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