Bike for overweight male

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by myost, Aug 9, 2013.

  1. myost

    myost New Member

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    Hi all,

    New to the forums and new to cycling as well. I'm looking to start cycling for additional exercise and for a convenient way to commute around town. I'm 5'11" and ~330 pounds and will be riding exclusively on the road or on paved bike trails.

    I've read up on other, similar, threads and most seem to recommend a hybrid or mountain bike with a steel fork, 36-spoke wheels and double walled rims. Most of the threads were from 6-8 years ago, so I was wondering if bike technology had improved since then and if modern suspension forks are more capable of supporting heavyweight riders.

    If anyone, particularly someone who is or has been in my position, has any tips or could recommend a couple bikes I would really appreciate it!

    My budget is $400-$500 and I've been looking at the Giant Sedona DX.

    Thanks!
    Matt
     
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  2. Rick Walls

    Rick Walls New Member

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    Hi, I started out with a 400.00 hybrid schwinn voyager 24, it has a nice padded seat and you can ride it around town and on dirt if desired. The main thing is to get the bike and start out easy. Try to work your way up to at least 30 minutes rides at least three times per week and it will help you with your weight loss journey. I also limited my calorie intake to about 1500 calories per day and so far I have lost 30 pounds in two months. I would also recommend you buy a bike from your local bike shop and get the warranty so they can fit it to you and make adjustments, flat tire changes and that sort of thing. I bought my bike from performance bike and they were great about fitting the bike to me and helping with my questions. Riding is lots of fun and I am glad to hear you have decided to start cycling. Good Luck.
     
  3. Hillrider

    Hillrider Banned

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    You Need a CCM department store bike. noce ride easy to maintain etc.
     
  4. FlyingPancreas

    FlyingPancreas New Member

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    Hi, I'm a noob in a very similar situation, though not completely identical. I'm 5'11 and about 250. Even at 330, I don't think you need to be overly concerned about your weight breaking the bike or something. In any case, front suspension is really a device geared toward reducing shock on your arms from going over bumps, cracks, potholes, etc. If you are looking at riding on almost exclusively paved roads, then you may not want the suspension feature as - to my very, very, very limited knowledge of current bikes - it tends to add a bit of weight to the bike.

    My situation is *slightly* different in that while I too am looking at riding mostly paved roads, I'd like to just have the option to hit a dirt trail now and then. Plus, Philly's roads are not always in such hot shape - particularly in Center City. So I'm strongly considering a hybrid like the Giant Roam 2. Definitely a little above your noted price point, but at least I'm with you on brand (Giant's specs seem a bit better than other brands' offerings at the same price point - I'd have to go up $200 or so on the Roam for an equivalent offering from Trek or Specialized). So at least on paper, I like Giant and am enthusiastic about taking a test ride of the Roam 2.

    I used to bike heavily in my youth, but I've been away from it for so long, modern bikes are quite alien to me. But seemingly the crappiest of them seem better than the high-intermediate quality stuff I was riding 20 years ago.

    One cool feature of the Sedona DX you're considering is that it has a lockout feature for the front suspension, in case you ever want to shut that down to ride on smooth pavement. One example of a feature Giant seems to offer consistently at lower price points than the competition. I'm not a Giant shill either, just a guy window-shopping bikes... If you decide you maybe want to do without the front suspension, you might want to take a look at Giant's Escape line:
    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/bikes/model/escape.3/14810/66193/
    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/bikes/model/escape.city/14810/66194/#features

    or the Cannondale Quick line:
    http://www.cannondale.com/2013/bikes/recreation-urban/recreation/quick-sl/quick-6
     
  5. Dave Cutter

    Dave Cutter Active Member

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    I started out at around 257 pounds on a used mountain bike with no shocks of any kind. If I was to repeat the process today.... I would pick-up a brand new big-box store 29 inch wheeled mountain bike without any suspension.

    Something tough enough to handle your size today.... and still be fun for a casual ride next season when you're slim, trim, and on a road bike with skinny tires.

    I got down to my idea weight (184 pounds) in just a few months of cycling and using a calorie counting app (on an android tablet). I used the free app called "lose it!"..... many others just as good.
     
  6. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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  7. Hillrider

    Hillrider Banned

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    CCM, 50 dollars used, durable steel product. if you break it buy another one.
     
  8. myost

    myost New Member

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    Thanks all for the replies!

    Admittedly I have no idea what CCM means, but I get the gist.

    Also, I live in a cold-weather climate, will riding in light snow or cold temperatures damage the bike? Do most riders just hang it up for the winter and take up indoor exercise?
     
  9. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    the Giant Sedona is good but i would change the seatpost and the stem, with winter apparel you can ride in the cold, thats a personal decision really, some people won't ride in the cold, the bike won't be damaged in as much as you dry the wet parts in the bike with a cloth when you come back home,
     
  10. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    To the first question, temperature will not cause any damage to a bike, be that bike steel, aluminum, titanium, magnesium, or carbon fiber. However, salt on roads can lead to corrosion on some bike parts or materials, and water ingress can wash grease out of bearings and grit into bearings. Spray on wet roads can also nicely distribute road grit throughout the bikes' drivetrain. However, that doesn't mean that you should avoid those situation as precautions can be taken to minimize the risks from damage, and the routine maintenance required to keep the bike in top shape is a doddle. What do most riders do? It varies. Some hang it up for the winter or rainy days. Some only go out when it's dry, and there are some that soldier on no matter the conditions. It's all a function of your motivations and what you get out of cycling. I don't mind at all riding in the rain or cold, or even when it's snowing (to a point). Maydog may be the most stalwart rider here when it comes to riding in winter conditions as he commutes via bike through Minnesota winters. As for what bikes you should consider, I'd recommend visiting a number of bike shops and telling them what you're looking to do and what you're looking for. They can make recommendations that you can (if that bike shop is worth having your money) then test ride. I would recommend that you think about hybrid bikes as they offer an upright seating position, a wide gearing range, wider tires (which will provide you with more comfort and tire durability), and generally robust parts.
     
  11. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    Bikes are durable modes of transport and can handle adverse riding conditions with no ill effects. The biggest maintenance issue with riding out in the wet is getting grit on your drivetrain. It takes about 10 minutes to service a bike after a dirty ride. Rinse the bike with a hose (do not spray into the bearings), wipe the chain clean and lube.

    If you will be riding in any winter weather greater than a "light" snow, I am a fan of disc brakes. Traditional rim brakes can get packed with snow and ice, rendering them ineffective.

    My favorite inclement weather, all purpose bike right now is a cyclocross bike. It has a rigid fork, drop bars, integrated brifters, but uses 29" wheels and disc brakes.
     
  12. heightpower

    heightpower New Member

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    You might have already bought a bike, but hopefully this helps someone. I'm around your stats (a little taller and lighter). I've found these 3 bikes by Kona: AfricaBike 3, Minute, and Ute. They are all city commuters that are built tough. They all have built-in rear racks and the AB3 has a basket as well. I know of a rider who is 6'4" 375 pounds riding it and, yes she had some parts wear out a little faster, but she started at 400 pounds so that's saying a lot. Neither of us weigh that much. I'm torn between the AB3 and Minute.

    As an aside, I'd recommend throwing in some push-ups every other day. I use the Hundred Push-ups plan. 5 sets starts out low rep then increases every week or so. More muscle = more calories burned just while you're sitting around.

    What else? Hmm... Oh!
    Quickie specs:

    The AfricaBike 3 is $500. I don't know (and can't find) the official max weight limit. Not listed in the 2014 line-up.

    The Minute is $1000 and has a max load of 300lbs per the site. I don't know what it can get away with in terms of pushing the limits. Also unlisted in the 2014 line-up.

    The Ute is still around for 2014 and costs $1300. It comes with 2 panniers and has stronger breaks.

    In terms of speed, Minute > AB3.
     
  13. leroy1010

    leroy1010 New Member

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    [​IMG]Generally,I like to suggest someone to buy carbon bike,But for you budget is $400-$500 I only suggest buy a Aluminum bike. It is also good.
     
  14. myost

    myost New Member

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    Once again, thank you all for the replies! I'm going to the LBS tomorrow and having this info beforehand is critical to me. Thank you all!
     
  15. heightpower

    heightpower New Member

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    That's awesome! I hope you let us know what you ended up getting. (Why the crap am I so excited about someone else's bike)
     
  16. Shagun Rai

    Shagun Rai New Member

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    Thats a great decision taken by you myost. I think heightpower's reply is apt on what you should buy.
    Gudluck
     
  17. myost

    myost New Member

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    Sorry for the long delay...I wasn't able to purchase the bike when I thought I would, and I've been swamped in law school for the last couple weeks.

    Finally, today, I was able to get to the LBS and check out some bikes. The people there were very helpful and spent a lot of time looking at bikes that would support my weight and be comfortable to ride.

    They, and Giant, were sold out of the Sedona DX, but they did have a Giant Cypress in stock. I test-rode that, along with a couple bikes by Specialized and the Schwinn Voyager. I liked the Specialized style quite a bit, but ultimately I was most comfortable on the Cypress.

    I ordered a '14 Cypress DX and it should arrive next week. The only drawback is the 32-spoke rims but the guy at the LBS said it shouldn't be a problem. I can't wait to get out on the road!
     
  18. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    32 spokes is ok too for a robust wheel, autumn and winter is coming, i would throw in some fenders, like SKS which are easy to install, they do the job and they are stylish, a lawyer who was an acquaintance of mine bought a very similar Jamis bike, so the DX has a solid seatpost unlike the LX, good choice because you don't want moving parts in such a sensible area of the bike,
     
  19. steve

    steve Administrator
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    Quote: Originally Posted by myost .
    I ordered a '14 Cypress DX and it should arrive next week. The only drawback is the 32-spoke rims but the guy at the LBS said it shouldn't be a problem. I can't wait to get out on the road!


    32's will be fine, if not you'll soon find out [​IMG] I don't think your main problem will be the wheels, it'll be having to buy a bunch of new kit every couple months as you shrink and the old kit becomes too baggy. This time last year I was about your weight and over 9 months went from wearing XXXL kit to medium [​IMG]
     
  20. myost

    myost New Member

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    Quote: Originally Posted by steve .

    32's will be fine, if not you'll soon find out [​IMG] I don't think your main problem will be the wheels, it'll be having to buy a bunch of new kit every couple months as you shrink and the old kit becomes too baggy. This time last year I was about your weight and over 9 months went from wearing XXXL kit to medium [​IMG]


    Steve that is incredible. Congratulations on your success!
     
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