Bike helmet standards

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Donga, May 4, 2006.

  1. Donga

    Donga Guest

    >From the Cycling Australia website:

    "The Australian Road Rules clearly demand that a bicycle helmet must
    meet the Australian / New Zealand Standards. The AS/NZ 2063 Standard
    does not recognise any other standard helmet from any other country.
    Accordingly, only helmets that meet and carry the AS/ NZ Standards
    approval are permitted for use on Australian Roads - including road
    races conducted under the auspices of CA and its affiliates."

    This means that to race not only would cost me the licence fee - also I
    would have to buy a new helmet, because my helmet bought cheaply on the
    internet doesn't have the sticker - even thought the same helmet is
    approved ... and I'd have to pay the local price.

    Here's an item from Cycling News, May 2, 2006. Foreign equivalent
    standards are good enough for MTBA, and for Cycling Australia in the
    case of track and MTB.

    "MTBA clarifies full-face helmet rule
    Australia mountain bike governing body MTBA recently announced that
    from July 1 2006, full-face helmets will be mandatory at all MTBA
    sanctioned DH events. This week, the organisation further clarified the
    rule by releasing a list of compliance standards. In short, the
    organization states that competition helmets must carry the Australian
    Standards compliance sticker or an international equivalent. The first
    list of standards that MTBA will accept as an international equivalent
    to the Australian/New Zealand Standard 2063 is as follows:

    (1) ANSI Z90.4;
    (2) Snell "B" or "N" series;
    (3) ASTM F-1447.
    (4) Canadian CAN/CSA-D113.2-M;
    (5) U.S. CPSC standard for bicycle helmets;
    (6) European CEN standard for bicycle helmets (EN1078)
    Other international standards may be added from time to time."

    I would be interested to know how "clear" are the "Australian road
    rules" that Cycling Australia has cited. Are they so tight that
    equivalent standards cannot be accommodated? The Queensland Road Rules
    say:

    "...approved bicycle helmet means a helmet that complies with-
    (a) AS 2063.1 and 2063.2; or
    (b) another standard the chief executive considers is at least equal to
    that standard"

    ....so the flexibility is there, if the CE wanted to use it and CA
    wanted to pursue it, by perhaps recommending to state transport
    departments that they should recognise these other standards. CA seems
    to accept these other standards are good enough for track and MTB, so
    why not for the road?

    I must remember to ask CA this question!!

    Donga
     
    Tags:


  2. Donga wrote:

    > Here's an item from Cycling News, May 2, 2006. Foreign equivalent
    > standards are good enough for MTBA, and for Cycling Australia in the
    > case of track and MTB.


    Isn't is a chalk and cheese thing?

    Different events in different places?

    > CA seems
    > to accept these other standards are good enough for track and MTB, so
    > why not for the road?


    Because CA doesn't make the laws that apply on the road?
     
  3. Treadly

    Treadly New Member

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    Triathlon rules say that if the helmet is recognised in a country that has a sister organisation of the triathlon federation then that helmet is ok to use in a race here.
    When you get a permit from the police to have a race here it's actually called a "permit for suspension of road rules". (In Western Australia anyway.)
     
  4. leestevens

    leestevens New Member

    Joined:
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    I'm pretty sure BUT don't quote me on this, but you can use any helmet for a road race as long as the course is closed to all traffic. Not a rolling stoppage of traffic but a total road closure.
     
  5. Gemma_k

    Gemma_k Guest

    "leestevens" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >
    > Donga Wrote:
    >> >From the Cycling Australia website:

    >>
    >> "The Australian Road Rules clearly demand that a bicycle helmet must
    >> meet the Australian / New Zealand Standards. The AS/NZ 2063 Standard
    >> does not recognise any other standard helmet from any other country.
    >> Accordingly, only helmets that meet and carry the AS/ NZ Standards
    >> approval are permitted for use on Australian Roads - including road
    >> races conducted under the auspices of CA and its affiliates."
    >>
    >> This means that to race not only would cost me the licence fee - also I
    >> would have to buy a new helmet, because my helmet bought cheaply on the
    >> internet doesn't have the sticker - even thought the same helmet is
    >> approved ... and I'd have to pay the local price.
    >>
    >> Here's an item from Cycling News, May 2, 2006. Foreign equivalent
    >> standards are good enough for MTBA, and for Cycling Australia in the
    >> case of track and MTB.
    >>
    >> "MTBA clarifies full-face helmet rule
    >> Australia mountain bike governing body MTBA recently announced that
    >> from July 1 2006, full-face helmets will be mandatory at all MTBA
    >> sanctioned DH events. This week, the organisation further clarified the
    >> rule by releasing a list of compliance standards. In short, the
    >> organization states that competition helmets must carry the Australian
    >> Standards compliance sticker or an international equivalent. The first
    >> list of standards that MTBA will accept as an international equivalent
    >> to the Australian/New Zealand Standard 2063 is as follows:
    >>
    >> (1) ANSI Z90.4;
    >> (2) Snell "B" or "N" series;
    >> (3) ASTM F-1447.
    >> (4) Canadian CAN/CSA-D113.2-M;
    >> (5) U.S. CPSC standard for bicycle helmets;
    >> (6) European CEN standard for bicycle helmets (EN1078)
    >> Other international standards may be added from time to time."
    >>
    >> I would be interested to know how "clear" are the "Australian road
    >> rules" that Cycling Australia has cited. Are they so tight that
    >> equivalent standards cannot be accommodated? The Queensland Road Rules
    >> say:
    >>
    >> "...approved bicycle helmet means a helmet that complies with-
    >> (a) AS 2063.1 and 2063.2; or
    >> (b) another standard the chief executive considers is at least equal to
    >> that standard"
    >>
    >> ....so the flexibility is there, if the CE wanted to use it and CA
    >> wanted to pursue it, by perhaps recommending to state transport
    >> departments that they should recognise these other standards. CA seems
    >> to accept these other standards are good enough for track and MTB, so
    >> why not for the road?
    >>
    >> I must remember to ask CA this question!!
    >>
    >> Donga

    > I'm pretty sure BUT don't quote me on this, but you can use any helmet
    > for a road race as long as the course is closed to all traffic. Not a
    > rolling stoppage of traffic but a total road closure.
    >


    Nope...not anymore..
    Only allowed other countries' standards for individual events like the
    individual pursuit, and track time trials. ie on the Track Only. not for
    any mass-start event.
    I suspect an insurance issue rather than a road rules issue. If they were
    really worried about the 'road rules' then we not be allowed to start unless
    we have bikes with reflectors and bells.....
    For the lastest update see here:
    http://www.cycling.org.au/Content/N...chnical_Regulations/2006TechRegAmendments.pdf

    Gemma (owner of two aero helmets, which will have to come out once a year
    for the pursuit :-(
     
  6. Gemma_k

    Gemma_k Guest

    "Donga" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1146731859.737[email protected]
    > >From the Cycling Australia website:

    >
    >
    > ...so the flexibility is there, if the CE wanted to use it and CA
    > wanted to pursue it, by perhaps recommending to state transport
    > departments that they should recognise these other standards. CA seems
    > to accept these other standards are good enough for track and MTB, so
    > why not for the road?
    >

    Because the 'official importers' of helmets are also 'industry'. And
    'industry' are the ones who set Australian Standards (not govt). And
    despite the fact your helmet will most likely pass Australian Standards, it
    does not by virtue that it does not have a little shiny sticker. So the
    importers and manufacturers here who can afford the testing get to sell
    helmets and others don't. It was actually illegal to sell helmets that did
    not meet the standard. The ACCC got involved and this was overturned,
    provided consumers are made aware that the helmet they are buying is 'not
    for road use'. That is why you can buy some helmets with big warning
    stickers on the box and label on the strap (but sitll contain a CPSP, ANSI
    and CE sticker inside!!!)

    Part of Australain Standards is mandatory testing. Other countries let
    their industry 'self regulate' and certify their products as meeting the
    standard - if they get caught labelling something that does not meet the
    standard they get in deep poo. Here 'industry cannot be trusted' to do
    self-certify and so samples from each batch are tested, which is why our
    helmets are so expensive. Our standard is sufficiently different from other
    countries too that it means our little standard keeps perpetuating, and
    throws confusion on what is an 'equivalent standard'.
    There is a pretty good comparison here: http://www.bhsi.org/stdcomp.htm
    you can see how they're all the same but 'different'

    Our standard is one of my pet hates!

    :-(
    Gemm
     
  7. SomeGuy

    SomeGuy New Member

    Joined:
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    Steal a sticker from another helmet and stick it to yours? If the identical model is available here and is Aus Standards certified, an 'aftermarket' sticker should solve your problem.
     
  8. Steve

    Steve Guest

    Have never observed an official checking helmets for labels but this is a
    classic case of letting sleeping dogs lie , if you ask the question to a
    race organiser , from an insurance point of view he will be foolish to let
    you ride after the fact. Saying that, I can think of some commisares from
    the past one from SA & one NSW who would have relished checking everybody's
    helmets.
    Steve
    Ideal
     
  9. Gemma_k

    Gemma_k Guest

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Have never observed an official checking helmets for labels but this is a
    > classic case of letting sleeping dogs lie , if you ask the question to a
    > race organiser , from an insurance point of view he will be foolish to let
    > you ride after the fact. Saying that, I can think of some commisares
    > from the past one from SA & one NSW who would have relished checking
    > everybody's helmets.


    At last year's Club Championships at Mooloolaba they checked _every_ helmet
    at the time trial at the same time as the usual seat and handlebar check....

    Gemma
     
  10. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    leestevens wrote:
    > Donga Wrote:
    > > >From the Cycling Australia website:

    > >
    > > "The Australian Road Rules clearly demand that a bicycle helmet must
    > > meet the Australian / New Zealand Standards. The AS/NZ 2063 Standard
    > > does not recognise any other standard helmet from any other country.
    > > Accordingly, only helmets that meet and carry the AS/ NZ Standards
    > > approval are permitted for use on Australian Roads - including road
    > > races conducted under the auspices of CA and its affiliates."
    > >
    > > This means that to race not only would cost me the licence fee - also I
    > > would have to buy a new helmet, because my helmet bought cheaply on the
    > > internet doesn't have the sticker - even thought the same helmet is
    > > approved ... and I'd have to pay the local price.
    > >
    > > Here's an item from Cycling News, May 2, 2006. Foreign equivalent
    > > standards are good enough for MTBA, and for Cycling Australia in the
    > > case of track and MTB.
    > >
    > > "MTBA clarifies full-face helmet rule
    > > Australia mountain bike governing body MTBA recently announced that
    > > from July 1 2006, full-face helmets will be mandatory at all MTBA
    > > sanctioned DH events. This week, the organisation further clarified the
    > > rule by releasing a list of compliance standards. In short, the
    > > organization states that competition helmets must carry the Australian
    > > Standards compliance sticker or an international equivalent. The first
    > > list of standards that MTBA will accept as an international equivalent
    > > to the Australian/New Zealand Standard 2063 is as follows:
    > >
    > > (1) ANSI Z90.4;
    > > (2) Snell "B" or "N" series;
    > > (3) ASTM F-1447.
    > > (4) Canadian CAN/CSA-D113.2-M;
    > > (5) U.S. CPSC standard for bicycle helmets;
    > > (6) European CEN standard for bicycle helmets (EN1078)
    > > Other international standards may be added from time to time."
    > >
    > > I would be interested to know how "clear" are the "Australian road
    > > rules" that Cycling Australia has cited. Are they so tight that
    > > equivalent standards cannot be accommodated? The Queensland Road Rules
    > > say:
    > >
    > > "...approved bicycle helmet means a helmet that complies with-
    > > (a) AS 2063.1 and 2063.2; or
    > > (b) another standard the chief executive considers is at least equal to
    > > that standard"
    > >
    > > ....so the flexibility is there, if the CE wanted to use it and CA
    > > wanted to pursue it, by perhaps recommending to state transport
    > > departments that they should recognise these other standards. CA seems
    > > to accept these other standards are good enough for track and MTB, so
    > > why not for the road?
    > >
    > > I must remember to ask CA this question!!
    > >
    > > Donga

    > I'm pretty sure BUT don't quote me on this, but you can use any helmet
    > for a road race as long as the course is closed to all traffic. Not a
    > rolling stoppage of traffic but a total road closure.


    Incorrect. See this :

    3.5.03. A helmet must carry the relevant approval sticker confirming
    approval
    and certification to AS/NZ 2063 before a cyclist is permitted to start
    in
    any cycling event.

    from :

    http://www.vic.cycling.org.au/Rules...a -Technical Regulations - JANUARY 2006_.pdf
     
  11. Steve

    Steve Guest

    I understand it could occur a time-trials, I mean't road races (massed
    start)
    Steve
    Ideal
    "Gemma_k" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Have never observed an official checking helmets for labels but this is a
    >> classic case of letting sleeping dogs lie , if you ask the question to a
    >> race organiser , from an insurance point of view he will be foolish to
    >> let you ride after the fact. Saying that, I can think of some
    >> commisares from the past one from SA & one NSW who would have relished
    >> checking everybody's helmets.

    >
    > At last year's Club Championships at Mooloolaba they checked _every_
    > helmet at the time trial at the same time as the usual seat and handlebar
    > check....
    >
    > Gemma
    >
     
  12. SteveA

    SteveA New Member

    Joined:
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    Three out of my four current helmets are direct imports and do not carry the Australian compliance sticker. They are all top of the range helmets that I have got cheap because they were last year's colour (thank the fashionistas for cheap bike gear, outdoor gear etc when this year's fashion colour changes).

    My colleague in the next office to mine has a helmet that is about a million years old, has a shell cracked in 3 places and dodgy foam. She is legal. I am not. Pffft.

    I have some old kids helmets which my girls have grown out of. I may have to do a 'stickerectomy' and graft them onto my foreign helmets.

    SteveA
     
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