Bike Help!!!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ron, Feb 10, 2003.

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  1. Ron

    Ron Guest

    Due to years of rugby injuries (knees), I've decided to start riding to stay in shape this coming
    spring (easier on the knees vs. 8 mile runs). I'm 6'4", 248lbs and very fit. My problem is that most
    road bikes I've investigated are made for the 145lb athlete. Can someone please point me to a source
    that would cater to my build. I'm very serious and want to work very hard. I have an old touring
    bike that's extremely heavy and cumbersome to ride.

    Thanks for the help.

    Ron
     
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  2. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    Sounds like your bike, heavy and cumbersome caters to your build and to your objective fitness.

    I ride a forty pound bike more than five-thousand miles per year and at 220#, 74", 54 yo, 100/60 am
    reasonably fit.

    "Ron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Due to years of rugby injuries (knees), I've decided to start riding to stay in shape this coming
    > spring (easier on the knees vs. 8 mile runs). I'm 6'4", 248lbs and very fit. My problem is that
    > most road bikes I've investigated are made for the 145lb athlete. Can someone please point me to a
    > source that would cater to my build. I'm very serious and want to work very hard. I have an old
    > touring bike that's extremely heavy and cumbersome to ride.
    >
    > Thanks for the help.
    >
    > Ron
     
  3. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Ron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Due to years of rugby injuries (knees), I've decided to start riding to stay in shape this coming
    > spring (easier on the knees vs. 8 mile runs). I'm 6'4", 248lbs and very fit. My problem is that
    > most road bikes I've investigated are made for the 145lb athlete. Can someone please point me to a
    > source that would cater to my build. I'm very serious and want to work very hard. I have an old
    > touring bike that's extremely heavy and cumbersome to ride.

    I'm 6'10", 230 lb. I have several bikes and do a variety of riding, including fast (20+ mph),
    intermediate distance (30-50 mile) club rides as well as many long distance rides (100-250 mile)
    each season. All of my bikes are made from touring frames. My favorite is a Cannondale. Touring
    frames are particularly well suited for large riders, being a little stronger, and having a little
    more wheelbase, and generally larger frame clearances to fit a larger range of tire sizes. A touring
    bike may not be what you need, but a touring frame built up with more standard components may suit
    you well. I think fat tubed aluminum frames are slightly better for strong riders in large frame
    sizes because of their increase lateral stiffness, but that's not a huge issue. Cannondale and Klein
    make "racing" bikes with this sort of frame, the large riders I know who have them have been quite
    happy with them.

    At 248 lb, you're likely to have wheel issues. Some people (like myself) are easy on wheels, and can
    get away with conventional ones. I have a pair of 32 spoke Mavic/Ultegra (Open Pro, with aluminum
    nipples) that have held up well for years, even with 23 mm tires. I also have a set of heavier,
    custom made 36 spoke wheels with touring rims that I leave fatter tires on (28 mm) for long, rural
    rides. It's vitally important that your wheels be well tensioned and stress relieved (see the FAQ).
    I've had good luck with factory built wheels that I have carefully gone over myself after learning
    the process (it's not hard). With your size and build, stay away from "stupid light" components
    (stems, handlebars, seatposts), you should be OK with standard group components.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, Ron <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Due to years of rugby injuries (knees), I've decided to start riding to stay in shape this coming
    >spring (easier on the knees vs. 8 mile runs). I'm 6'4", 248lbs and very fit. My problem is that
    >most road bikes I've investigated are made for the 145lb athlete. Can someone please point me to a
    >source that would cater to my build. I'm very serious and want to work very hard. I have an old
    >touring bike that's extremely heavy and cumbersome to ride.

    You are not so big or heavy that you exceed the available stock sizing of some brands, depending on
    your dimensions, but it's going to take some calling around to find bikes in stock to test ride,
    most shops will not stock many (or any) big bikes. You might like a fat-tube aluminum bike like a
    Cannondale. I wouldn't rule out steel either but to make it stiff enough in that sort of size it
    will be heavier.

    --Paul
     
  5. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Paul Southworth <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You are not so big or heavy that you exceed the available stock sizing of some brands, depending
    > on your dimensions

    I'm not so sure about that. Most modern frames seem to top out at 61cm (and that's usually measured
    center-to-top). I can't remember the last time I saw a new 63 cm c-c frame.

    Art "63 cm c-c" Harris
     
  6. Ron

    Ron Guest

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]spamatallattbi.com> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Ron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Due to years of rugby injuries (knees), I've decided to start riding to stay in shape this
    > > coming spring (easier on the knees vs. 8 mile runs). I'm 6'4", 248lbs and very fit. My problem
    > > is that most road bikes I've investigated are made for the 145lb athlete. Can someone please
    > > point me to a source that would cater to my build. I'm very serious and want to work very hard.
    > > I have an old touring bike that's extremely heavy and cumbersome to ride.
    >
    > I'm 6'10", 230 lb. I have several bikes and do a variety of riding, including fast (20+ mph),
    > intermediate distance (30-50 mile) club rides as well as many long distance rides (100-250 mile)
    > each season. All of my bikes are made from touring frames. My favorite is a Cannondale. Touring
    > frames are particularly well suited for large riders, being a little stronger, and having a little
    > more wheelbase, and generally larger frame clearances to fit a larger range of tire sizes. A
    > touring bike may not be what you need, but a touring frame built up with more standard components
    > may suit you well. I think fat tubed aluminum frames are slightly better for strong riders in
    > large frame sizes because of their increase lateral stiffness, but that's not a huge issue.
    > Cannondale and Klein make "racing" bikes with this sort of frame, the large riders I know who have
    > them have been quite happy with them.
    >
    > At 248 lb, you're likely to have wheel issues. Some people (like myself) are easy on wheels, and
    > can get away with conventional ones. I have a pair of 32 spoke Mavic/Ultegra (Open Pro, with
    > aluminum nipples) that have held up well for years, even with 23 mm tires. I also have a set of
    > heavier, custom made 36 spoke wheels with touring rims that I leave fatter tires on (28 mm) for
    > long, rural rides. It's vitally important that your wheels be well tensioned and stress relieved
    > (see the FAQ). I've had good luck with factory built wheels that I have carefully gone over myself
    > after learning the process (it's not hard). With your size and build, stay away from "stupid
    > light" components (stems, handlebars, seatposts), you should be OK with standard group components.

    I really appreciate the help with this topic. I'll investigate all of the above. In addition to my
    size, I'm a real novice and haven't worked out on a bike since college (other than a sadistic
    spinning class). Thanks!
     
  7. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Paul Southworth <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > You are not so big or heavy that you exceed the available stock sizing of some brands, depending
    > > on your dimensions
    >
    > I'm not so sure about that. Most modern frames seem to top out at 61cm (and that's usually
    > measured center-to-top). I can't remember the last time I saw a new 63 cm c-c frame.

    Some LBS do not stock them but they are made by many builders, Bianchi, f'rexample up to 63, as most
    Italian builders do. Gunnar goes to 62, Waterford (when they had standard sizes) up to 68!

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  8. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Paul Southworth <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > You are not so big or heavy that you exceed the available stock sizing of some brands,
    > > > depending on your dimensions
    > >
    > > I'm not so sure about that. Most modern frames seem to top out at 61cm (and that's usually
    > > measured center-to-top). I can't remember the last time I saw a new 63 cm c-c frame.
    >
    > Some LBS do not stock them but they are made by many builders, Bianchi, f'rexample up to 63, as
    > most Italian builders do. Gunnar goes to 62, Waterford (when they had standard sizes) up to 68!

    Ah, they still have stock geo's. !

    Robin Hubert
     
  9. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 10 Feb 2003 20:14:10 -0800, [email protected] (Ron) wrote:

    >Due to years of rugby injuries (knees), I've decided to start riding to stay in shape this coming
    >spring (easier on the knees vs. 8 mile runs). I'm 6'4", 248lbs and very fit. My problem is that
    >most road bikes I've investigated are made for the 145lb athlete. Can someone please point me to a
    >source that would cater to my build.

    A number of years ago while on a club ride we were joined by an ex-linebacker (Washington Redskins)
    named Pete Wysocki. He was about your size and also very fit. He was riding a Merlin, which he said
    he had had for a number of years. I didn't notice what wheels he was using.

    A friend of mine is also about your size and has a number of bikes. His main ride is a custom
    Serotta titanium. I recall it was first built with Hugi hubbed wheels, and one of the flanges broke
    right off the rear hub after only a few rides. It was replaced under warrenty and the replacement is
    still going strong.

    He rides a Co-Motion touring bike. He was constantly breaking spokes on the rear wheel and recently
    had Sheldon build him a 48-spoke, Phil hubbed rear. We'll see how that works out when we do a loaded
    tour in the Rockies this summer. :)

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  10. Ambishawn

    Ambishawn Guest

    I'd go with a Custom steel or titaium frame like Indepndent Fabrications , Waterford, or Steelman.
    Actually Zinn makes great custom frames in large sizes. The handling will be really good on a
    custom frame.
     
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