Bike I.D.

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by powinc, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. powinc

    powinc New Member

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    What's the best way to positively identify your own bike?

    I engraved my son's name on his BMX underneath the bottom bracket and on the head stem, but I feel this may be a bit harsh on my new roadie.

    Are there more astatic ways of marking one's own bike??

    powinc
     
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  2. amirm

    amirm New Member

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    Just a couple of ideas (not sure if feasible):

    1. Security companies use a special pen to write info like the driver's licence on goods. The writing is almost invisible but the ink will light up with UV.

    2. HSV uses a similar technology (I think) on their cars. They call it DNA.

    Hope this provides some clue to start with.

    Cheers,
    Amir.


     
  3. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    A personal fave of mine is to make your bike as weird or unappealing as possible to thieves.

    Another alternative is to contact your local neighbourhood watch, who should be able to engrave a license no. prefixed with a state letter under the bottom bracket.
    http://www.neighbourhoodwatch.com.au

    If you check the above website for Victoria you will see its "Mark it in March" month.
     
  4. TNA

    TNA Guest

  5. ftf

    ftf New Member

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    I saw something in this month's Bicycle Victoria magazine that was basically some sort of transmitter that you put down the seat-tube. Im not sure how its activated but the idea is that you can identify your bike (and im guessing here but possibly find out where it is) through this transmitter.

    It's not heavy and it wasn't expensive... I will look up the details tonight if i remember... unless anyone else knows what im talking about?

    Cheers,
    Troy
     
  6. C3

    C3 Guest

    What about some sort of medium-powered transmitter that
    sends a specially-coded beacon on a certain VHF/UHF
    frequency? Send it using code division to enhance the range
    of the device.

    It could be designed so that if it hasn't received an
    "unlocking code" from a device that you carry with you, for
    a certain number of hours (12? 24?) then it starts
    transmitting its signal, which should be detectable.

    Have it installed inside your frame so that it uses the
    frame as an antenna, and possibly have it inductively
    powered by your pedalling to charge a battery.

    This is all hypothetical...

    cheers,

    C3
     
  7. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "powinc" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What's the best way to positively identify your own bike?
    >
    > I engraved my son's name on his BMX underneath the bottom
    > bracket and on the head stem, but I feel this may be a bit
    > harsh on my new roadie.
    >
    > Are there more astatic ways of marking one's own bike??

    People are talking about EPIRBs and transmitters... but...

    Do you just want to get some custom stickers for it or
    something? Depends if you want to mark it for ID after theft
    or if you just want your name on it to make it easier to
    find in a crowd?

    Paint some parts of it a strange colour, get those custom
    stickers made, i.e. your name on the top tube, maybe make
    some stickers that look like they are supposed to be on
    their but ID you somehow.. "POWINC STAYS" or something
    equally "marketable" :)

    - POWINC CRANKS -
    20% More Power / 10% Less Effort

    Oh, you could try marking the frame "under" some other
    part - seatpost clamp, inside the dropouts, under the
    headset caps...

    hth hippy
     
  8. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "C3" <[email protected])> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What about some sort of medium-powered transmitter that
    > sends a specially-coded beacon on a certain VHF/UHF
    > frequency? Send it using code division to enhance the
    > range of the device.
    >
    > It could be designed so that if it hasn't received an
    > "unlocking code"
    from
    > a device that you carry with you, for a certain number of
    > hours (12? 24?) then it starts transmitting its signal,
    > which should be detectable.
    >
    > Have it installed inside your frame so that it uses the
    > frame as an
    antenna,
    > and possibly have it inductively powered by your pedalling
    > to charge a battery.
    >
    >
    > This is all hypothetical...
    >
    >
    > cheers,
    >
    > C3
    >

    How big are those E-Purbs. Surely someone could get
    something like this in the space of a seat tube. They are
    small but squarish but tubes are long. Would work better
    than an ordinary transmitter.
     
  9. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    ftf <[email protected]> wrote in news:W%L3c.28$r34.22
    @fe09.usenetserver.com:

    > I saw something in this month's Bicycle Victoria magazine
    > that was basically some sort of transmitter that you put
    > down the seat-tube. Im not sure how its activated but the
    > idea is that you can identify your bike (and im guessing
    > here but possibly find out where it is) through this
    > transmitter.

    I've got one of these in my bike which I bought when I lived
    in the UK. The one I have is a DataTag <www.datatag.com>. It
    is unpowered but emits a radio signal with a code when the
    relevant equipment is held close to it. I think the problem
    here would be the "relevant equipment" part, apparently all
    UK police forces have the right stuff (probably supplied by
    the manufacturer) but if Australian police don't have it
    then the DataTag is effectively useless.

    There's a mention of them here <http://www.nrma.com.au/pub/nrma/motor/car-
    research/secure-car/secure-valuables.shtml> in reference to
    protecting cars, but the price is much higher than I paid
    for the bike version. I paid around about $70.

    Graeme
     
  10. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "John Doe" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > How big are those E-Purbs. Surely someone could get
    > something like this in the space of a seat tube. They are
    > small but squarish but tubes are long. Would work better
    > than an ordinary transmitter.

    Yes, but EPIRBs (Emergency Position Indicating
    Radiobeacons) are only for use in emergency. I think if you
    used one to track a stolen bike you'd end up with a
    seriously p*ssed off rescue service and with luck, a very
    large bill for wasted time.

    Graeme
     
  11. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "Graeme" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "John Doe" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]
    > server.bigpond.net.au:
    >
    > > How big are those E-Purbs. Surely someone could get
    > > something like this in the space of a seat tube. They
    > > are small but squarish but tubes are long. Would work
    > > better than an ordinary transmitter.
    >
    > Yes, but EPIRBs (Emergency Position Indicating
    > Radiobeacons) are only for use in emergency. I think if
    > you used one to track a stolen bike you'd end up with a
    > seriously p*ssed off rescue service and with luck, a very
    > large bill for wasted time.
    >
    > Graeme

    Sorry. I was sort of thinking outside the box. I meant the
    idea of one not actually one that calls for emergency
    response. What I mean is something a little better than a
    vhf transmitter.
     
  12. C3

    C3 Guest

    I suspect that some form of modulation on the VHF band
    would be ideal, since the signal can travel further than
    higher frequencies. It doesn't have to be identical to an
    SES beacon.

    I used the word 'beacon' loosely.

    cheers,

    C3
     
  13. C3

    C3 Guest

    Personalising your bike may identify it to you, but it's not
    really going to be enough if you want to legally recover it.
    Unfortunately, I don't think there's an easy answer to all
    this. Any determined thief can remove/destroy the
    transmitter or unique markings.

    cheers,

    C3
     
  14. hippy

    hippy New Member

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    Why wouldn't it be enough? How else do you get stuff back?

    "Yes officer, it's the one with HIPPY written down the side and the picture of the semi-naked chick on the toptube". If the stickers are still on it after the bike is recovered - why wouldn't stickers be acceptable to ID the bike?
    It's not like bikes are like VCRs, where every one of the same model will be the same (barring that incident with the yoghurt and the leaky garden hose...)

    hippy
     
  15. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Yes, but you haven't seen my bikes. Like my lovely little road bike for short/medium distances, why steal something with 150mm cranks & cotter pins? :D
    Have different bikes for different purposes, don't leave the expen$ive ones on display or out of sight too long for potential thieves to tamper with.

    Timely story from CNN:
    GPS bicycles used to bait thieves
    Wednesday, March 10, 2004 Posted: 11:58 AM EST (1658 GMT)
    http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/ptech/03/10/bikes.gps1.reut/

    AMSTERDAM, Holland (Reuters) -- Amsterdam police will use bicycles equipped with hidden GPS transmitters to bait thieves and track them down in the latest effort to stamp out rampant bike theft, a police spokesman said Tuesday.
     
  16. Drs

    Drs Guest

    C3 <[email protected])> wrote in
    message [email protected]
    > Personalising your bike may identify it to you, but it's
    > not really going to be enough if you want to legally
    > recover it. Unfortunately, I don't think there's an easy
    > answer to all this. Any determined thief can
    > remove/destroy the transmitter or unique markings.

    Yes, but those POWINC cranks are pretty unusual...

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two
    hours of bloody, barbarous torture in gloating detail is
    considered indicia of religious piety, whereas a mere second
    gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for outraged
    apoplexy." Betty Bowers,
    http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
  17. Jose Rizal

    Jose Rizal Guest

    Graeme:

    > I've got one of these in my bike which I bought when I
    > lived in the UK. The one I have is a DataTag
    > <www.datatag.com>. It is unpowered but emits a radio
    > signal with a code when the relevant equipment is held
    > close to it.

    This is more of an ID system than a locator system, is that
    right? How close does the scanner have to be to detect the
    transponder?
     
  18. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "C3" <[email protected])> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I suspect that some form of modulation on the VHF band
    > would be ideal,
    since
    > the signal can travel further than higher frequencies. It
    > doesn't have to
    be
    > identical to an SES beacon.
    >
    > I used the word 'beacon' loosely.
    >
    > cheers,
    >
    > C3
    >
    >

    Yes well that I wouldnt know as I have no idea about these
    kinds of things. I assumed (obviously incorrectly) that
    those types of beacons were made to have an excellent range
    (funny how misconceptions grow). Food for thought though.
    Since I like canyoning and the like I was always thinking of
    buying an EPIRB or whatever they are called but if there is
    something with better range that uses VHF then it sounds
    like a waste of money driven by media hype.

    Cheers Pete
     
  19. ftf

    ftf New Member

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    The ones I saw were being distributed here in Oz (of course, I didnt remember to up the name) and were around $40. Must remember to look over the weekend.

    It seemed like a great idea but like you say, it all depends on how available the "relevant equipment" is...

    Cheers,
    Troy
     
  20. C3

    C3 Guest

    Unfortunately, the device I described in my original reply
    to the parent was completely imaginary. I am only proposing
    what I think a good bike beacon would be like.

    Or at least as good as I can think of, with the technology
    currently available. If there is a market for this, it may
    be designed by some company, and sold. I suspect there isn't
    enough demand to make this sort of device profitable.

    cheers,

    C3
     
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