Bike modifications for semi-fat people!!!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by fabiosav, Nov 21, 2003.

  1. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

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    Most serious riders are really pretty thin, or quite fit. As an ex-elite athlete (worlds in cross-country skiing 20+ years ago!) I am getting back into sports, but am heavy. What changes would the experts gathered make to the standard sizing recommendations for a guy with a gut ? In my case 5ft 7, 190 lbs: not a hugely fat barrel shape, but not exactly lycra-stud either…

    Sloping top tube? Wheels? Avoid carbon? Take a cab and give up?

    PS The changes needed to the dimensions of the GUY are obvious….
     
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  2. copywrites

    copywrites New Member

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    Hey - not so bad. What kind of riding are you planning? Mountain biking, road, or just cruising?


    I do all the above at 6'0 #210, so it is possible. I suggest spending any extra cash on your rear wheel. Most bikes figure you to be about #130 - 150. Heavy duty spoke system will keep you from tweeking your wheel from the extra cargo atop. I learned that the hard way. Lots of time with the spoke wrench on those lightweight racing wheels...... I'd rather be riding.
     
  3. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Oh, PLEEZE!!
     
  4. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    190 is not an issue. But,here are frames of any material that might not be suitable.Define some choices and then ask questions...Check www.rivbike.com for an alternate spin on fit. There also big names that also offer moer 'relaxed fit options,if you might not be able to handle the 'racer boy' style.
     
  5. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

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    thanks. Objective is light 40+ year old geezer type races... some where betrwwen Lance and Depends...
     
  6. copywrites

    copywrites New Member

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    Allow me to quote from the campy website when asked about using their products when weighing over 80KG. (approx 160lbs).
    I could also have pulled quotes from numerous users that have complained to wheel manufacturers about broken spokes - all riders over 200 lbs. Or I could even dig into my archives and find the copy I wrote for a bike company back in the 80's. It was then the product manager told me to watch who we photo on our bikes because they are not designed for heavy people.

    While this Campy quote is referencing only their components and wheels, it can is is applied across the board to most componets, including forks, bottom brackets, wheels, some handlebars, etc. You can laugh if you want - but it is the laugh of an uneducated person...


    Hereis the Campy quote from their FAQ area...

    "Last year I weighed 80 kg and now I weigh 83 kg. Can I still use Campagnolo products, or am I too heavy?


    There is no clear dividing line defining when someone is "too heavy" for Campagnolo products. Many factors need to be considered.
    Campagnolo products were designed for "racing" type bicycles used on smooth asphalt roads or tracks. Any other use of Campagnolo products is improper.
    Magnified stresses and loads caused by a "heavy" rider, coupled with forces from an uneven road surface, greatly shorten the lifespan of Campagnolo products, especially if your bicycle is equipped with tires, wheels, or stiff frames that are poor at absorbing shocks and vibrations.
    The weight of the rider, type of bike and the style and conditions of use are all critical factors affecting the lifespan of your product.
    Technical knowledge, experience, common sense, and prudence are required. If you weigh 80 kg or more, you must be especially vigilant and have your bicycle inspected regularly for any evidence of cracks, deformation, or other signs of fatigue or stress. Check with your mechanic to discuss whether the components you selected are suitable for your use, and to determine the frequency of inspections. "
     
  7. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Well, actually to begin with 80 kg is 176 pounds. Your original commment referenced something much less, like 130 to 150. What rubbish.!!...Now for the Campy guote: it's nothing but CYA hooey. If you buy that kind of rot you should not even be riding bicycles. All one has to do is look at the real world, see what people are riding and how it works.Much better than blindly quoting self serving CYA drivel.... Ya don't need special custom built heavy duty wheels unless you are a total clyde.
     
  8. artl

    artl New Member

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    Spoken like a true lightweight. Every LBS (there are exceptions to this statement) that you go into will tell you that "new, low spoke count wheels work for everyone". This is baloney. When asked, Bontrager told me that I should "ride light" and avoid rough roads when using their wheels (I weigh 100 kg). Mavic "couldn't recommend" low spoke count wheels for normal sized individuals like myself. Hmm, I'm sure there might be exceptions, but since I can't try every wheel out there, I'll stick with well built 36 spoke rear wheels.
     
  9. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Fair enough, especially for a 220 pounder. My issue was with the statement that 'bikes are built 130-150 pounders'. And, yeah, I'm something of a tall really ripped lightweight. Something of a minority position thse days. There are plenty of wheels besides low spoke count lightweights. Alot of this lightweight stuff is just fad embraced by many who think light is a viable alternative to good nurition and fitness. Then they gripe when it fails. There is cetainly a case for strong rims,36 spokes AND good buld for heavier people,but to suggest the 'heavier threshhold is 150 is rubbish.
     
  10. rek

    rek New Member

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    As others have mentioned, wheels (specifically the back wheel) will be the #1 thing to look out for. At 190lbs, you'll be ok on a set of traditional wheels. (Depending on your style of riding) a handbuilt 32 spoke wheelset will suit you just fine. Put the money you save over boutique wheelsets on something where it'll be better spent, like an HRM or comfier saddle (if you need one.)

    I am 183cm/6'0" and about 89kg/195lb, and have no worries at all on handbuilt 32 spoke Open Pro wheels with sensible-thickness DT spokes.

    Machine built wheels did need a bit of truing every couple of months; having the spokes properly and evenly tensioned by a good wheelbuilder makes all the difference.
     
  11. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

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    [

    I am 183cm/6'0" and about 89kg/195lb, and have no worries at all on handbuilt 32 spoke Open Pro wheels with sensible-thickness DT spokes.

    Machine built wheels did need a bit of truing every couple of months; having the spokes properly and evenly tensioned by a good wheelbuilder makes all the difference. [/B][/QUOTE]


    Interesting; in fact just bought an Open Pro rear with a Powertap. I find the data fantastic, and it helps give the younger, fitter, riders a good laugh....

    Great responses: I really appreciaite the input.
     
  12. Zer0hmz

    Zer0hmz New Member

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    man, now you guys got me worried, I'm 215 pounds and I just got a Trek 1000. Should I worry =(
     
  13. eddiebrannan

    eddiebrannan New Member

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    this is a load of bollocks. i've ridden 20-spokes for ages and i'm 175lbs. just ride
     
  14. Fooz

    Fooz New Member

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    Ok....finally a topic I know...being 1.87m, and 100kg's...(17% bodyfat)...

    I had an aliminium frame bike, and tried the low spoke wheels...not a good idea...Mavic Ksyrium's didn't like it, Campy Proton's are nice, but for matchsticks!

    Two months ago I bought a 59cm Litespeed Ultimate titanium, with some Spinergy XaeroLite's on. Believe it or not, the wheels work...18 spokes front, 24 rear, and in 2 months only needed to be trued once (a stone I hit that sliced the tyre)....Spinergy website even claim they're lighter than Ksyrium SSC SL's....(they just don't look as cool)

    Hope it helps....
     
  15. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    Avoid the "silly" light stuff. See if you can fit some 28 mm tires.
    Get the wheels tension balanced, properly tensioned, and stress relieved by a trusted wheel person.
    Try out various fit situations. You may need to go with a stem that you can "flip up" until you work down your gut and attain form and flexibility.
    Follow guidelines for warm ups and cool downs.
    Stetching and flexibility will help get you back into competitive form.
    Avoid the cabs and never give up. Bicycling is a lifetime sport.
     
  16. jordon198

    jordon198 New Member

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    Watch the back wheel, I've found that the Alex 450 wheel a little fragile. Broke 3 rear spokes over the course of about 3 weeks. LBS said that some of the wheels that got out were a little suspect. I'm down to about 200 now, but started at 240, so the bike should hold up well for you other than that.
     
  17. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Broken spokes are often caused by bad wheel build,and improper tension. I'm only about 150, and the only spokes I ever broke were on a badly built rear OEM wheel, and that was one with 32 hole open pros,chorus hubs and poorly tensioned generic spokes.
     
  18. Zer0hmz

    Zer0hmz New Member

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    Jordan198,
    Thanks for the reassurance, I'll be taking it in the the LBS regularly and make sure everything is in good shape. On a side note, congratulations on your weight loss! 40 pounds! "that's almost half a Backstreet Boy"
     
  19. artl

    artl New Member

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    Well, I broke one of my cardinal rules today, I just ordered a new bike and I'm getting it with 24/28 (F/R) spoke Velomax wheels. The information on the Velomax website sold me. Specifically, having straight spokes that are threaded (no bend) on both ends makes a lot of sense to me. All of the spokes I've broken over the years were broken right at the bend, so I'm hoping these wheels work out. If not, I'll go back to the tried and true 36 hole Open Pro standard. I'll report back in a thousand miles or so.
     
  20. Joefish

    Joefish New Member

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    --->I am 6', 250+ lbs rider and have been riding on a Specialized M2 comp Alum frame with Alum fork and "boutique wheels" Rolf Vector Comps, for over 6 years with about 1400 miles a year plus 6 MS-150's (Houston to Austin). I live in Houston, TX where the roads are filled with potholes, cracks and debris. I stand and mash the pedals, turn hard and "bunny hop" over stuff in the road if needed. I drive to do some "hilly" rides, I love to climb. I have even taken to a dirt trail on occasion. In that time, the wheels have NEVER needed truing, although I did have one broken spoke (rear, non drive side) last year. LBS replaced it and inspected the other spokes, put another 500 miles since then. Last Friday I retired that bike, bought a Trek 2200 (carbon fork and carbon seat stays--nice and smooth!!), I upgraded the wheels from Bontrager Race to Race Lite (blue anodized). I have about 50 miles on the new wheels now, so far so good. I gave the Rolf wheels to my wife for her Trek 1200, she loves them.
    BTW, a HRM or comfier saddle is a very good idea!!!!
    Good Luck,
    Joe
     
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