Bike modifications for semi-fat people!!!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by fabiosav, Nov 21, 2003.

  1. copywrites

    copywrites New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't understand why you continue to ignore that which is obvious to the most casual observer. Do you realy think that a Small, 49 - 50cm bike is designed for 190 lbs?? Let me answer for you....NO IT ISN"T. It is designed for the typical rider, which would be a female or young , small male rider, probably weighing somewhere between 110 and 130 lbs. Thus the 130 part of that range. Then consider the most popular bike size sold is a Medium, ranging from 54 to 57 cm. That rider profile will be a rider between about 135 and 160. That is the 150 reference, given that most companies will engineer any product be be at least 20% stronger than needed. So the answer for probably 75% of bikes manufactured is 130 to 150 lbs. Quite simple to calculate if you take the time to do it.

    Sure there are larger bikes and larger riders - but they do not represent the majorityof the riding community - they are at the far end of the bell curve. Which is why campy probably designs for a max weight at 80kg. Very simple marketing - 90% of riders that will want to buy their products will fall below 80kg. There is little need or financial return for manufacturing a product that accommodates a higher weight. So sir, it is your response that is pure rubbish.

    2nd bit of analysis. Do you have any idea how much more stressis placed on a bike by a rider that weighs 190 vs a rider that weighs 170? Even though the weight varience is only about 20%, the difference in stress caused by the additional mass is abut 50%. Go to 210 and it is double, etc.

    So do an experiment. Load youself down with enough weight to make yourself 215. Then go ride your bike for about 500 miles. Just be prepared to do quite a bit of bike maintenance - especially to those wheels. I know, I have been riding for 30 years and while wheels have gotten better in terms of materials and designs, the ultimate goal of most manufacturers is to balance weight with strength. That is why I still need to upgrade my wheel - especially the rear wheel nearly every time I buy a bike.
     


  2. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Messages:
    5,133
    Likes Received:
    0
    The original poster is 5' 7" and 190. Where do you get this 49-50 cm hooey?? Besides, the tubing in the small off the shelf bike is very likely the same as in the larger sizes. The big makers aren't into size specific tubing.Within a given model,the wheels and other stuff will be the same. The small frame having a smaller stiffer triangle would actually be stiffer and more suitable. You are just slinging alot of hooey.
     
  3. drewski

    drewski New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    0
    i'm 5' 7" and 50cm is my size. maybe i've got short legs. only 30" inseam (crotch to floor, not pants length).

    i actually agree with the second part of your post, though, about the general lack of frame-size specific tube sizing. the smaller frames are usually stronger and stiffer than their larger sized counterparts.

    for the original poster, i used to race over a decade ago and i think with regualr exercise and a good diet, you're gonna shed pounds quickly. i started at 185lbs in mid-september (compared to my racing weight of 135 in 1992) and am now between 160-165lbs. the holidays and shorter days are taking their toll, but with dedication you're not staying at 190 for long. i've also been doing some running for cross-training and exercising about 5-6 times per week, for reference.

    my goal is 150 lbs. don't necessarily aim for your old racing physique or you may just beat yourself silly. good luck with it all!

    i'm using 24/28 f/r spoke-count cane creek wheels and have had no issues w/ getting out of true. for artl, i think the Velomax's should work out similarly. let us know.

    one word of advice on the 40+ racing scene. WATCH OUT! if you're going UCSF racing, often the cat 3-4 Masters races are faster than the seniors cat 3-4 races. they tend to be filled with ex-higher cat racers who are not in their prime shape, but more experienced and often push the pace than the seniors cat 3-4-5 who are folks just getting started who just tool around for the race hanging on for a bunch sprint.

    this is a vast generalization of Crits i've been in and have watched, where the avg speeds have been several MPH faster in the Masters 35+ vs. Seniors.
     
  4. copywrites

    copywrites New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    I do wish you would actually READ a post before you attempt to respond to it. Please copy the part where I said the poster was riding a 49 or 50 cm bike. Once again, let me answer for you.. I DIDN'T! I said that bikes are designed for riders between 130 lbs and 150lbs. There is no mention of the poster or his bike size in that statement. You stated I quoted some wild weight ranges such as 130 - 150 lbs. You were entirely correct - I DID. Then in a later post I went on to explain how I arrived at that range since you seemed to believe it was not a valid statement. None of those ever referenced our original poster.

    Further, I was making a broad statement about bikes that leads to the finer point. Our poster is far outside that weight range. The reference to 215 lbs was my reference to MY weight. My point being again I, ME, I have consistently had problems with rear wheels, breaking spokes, bending, etc. And while 215 is significantly harder on a bike than 190, 190 is plenty of weight and there is a significant likel hood that the poster will experience a similar fate as I have. Perhaps not as fast or not as drastic, but the probability exists.

    Neither have I ever said anything about frame strength. Not a single sentence - I have continued to stress COMPONENTS - and specifically wheels, and bottom brackets. Newflash - the frame is NOT a component.

    I would also suggest you read some other posts in this thread. There are several mentions of broken spokes, bent rims etc. Some mentiond weights, some did not. But again the point is, I personally experienced it, and now others have also stated they experienced it. So something apears to be wrong with your argument that weight doesn't matter, because several people have come forward to say "Yes it does". Perhaps the one poster said it best. Your arguments are "spoken like a true lightweight".
    Just because you haven't experienced the problem, it doesn't mean the problem doesn't exist.

    To our original poster: When you buy your bike, at least take the time to check the spoke tension on your wheels. Every bike I have ever purchased had poorly built factory wheels. But I will also tell you I don't buy $5000 bikes. I buy moderately priced bikes that have very average components. Then I change out the onews that are important to me, and I leave the rest alone. At age 50, I don't need an ultegra equipped bike. I just want one that won't leave me stranded in the middle of a 50 mile ride. I have never experienced a broken derailer or headset on a ride, so I ride with what comes on the bike. But I have experienced wheel problems. So I buy insurance against that by putting on a good, strong rear wheel, Not a boutique wheel, not a superlight wheel. Before I started doing that I had to call home for a rescue more than once. Since then, never. Boudreux might call that baloney, I call it piece of mind.

    In the end it is your decision. I have seen several pieces of good information in this post where they talk about their experience, not their opinion.

    We started this post not knowing what you intended to buy,where you intend to ride etc. If you are going to be jumping stumps in the woods you would get difference advice vs you plan to take only 5-10 mile jaunts on paved city streets. As I said in my original post, I do both, although as the years pass more is city road riding and less is mountain biking. But 10 years ago I rode at 190-195 and today I ride at 210-215. So even though my riding style is less abusive now vs 10 years ago, my added weight makes up for it and I find that past practices are still valid for me today.

    One man's experience, one man's opinion.



    :)
     
  5. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Messages:
    5,133
    Likes Received:
    0
    All that was just hooey slinging. You said bikes are designed for specific weights and you also mentioned frame sizes with regard to weight ranges. Thats all hooey too. The generalization that all factory built wheels are bad is hooey too. Some are, some aren't....Have a good day.I'm out of this one.
     
  6. pezmel

    pezmel New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm 6ft/300lbs and I've got almost 200 miles on my new trek 1500. I haven't had any problems so far.
     
  7. tacomee

    tacomee New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2003
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm not really clear about what the orginal poster plans to do with his bike-- I wouldn't think about pricey bikes or racing until you can ride 70-100 miles without any problems. Realisticly, stick to cheaper steel framed bike with 36 spoke factory wheels and even 28 mm tires for a while-- I personally wouldn't know what do with a real racing bike, because like 95% of bike riders, I don't have the skill or training.

    First you need to learn to ride a bike before you race one.

    Last of all, most light weight racing bike parts work fine for fat people-- look at the pack of 35 yr old plus thunder butts who have the thousands of dollars to sink into this sport. Truth be told, I'm 38 and 200 lbs and have intoduced HS kids to riding-- only to watch them get better than me in one summer! No lightweight bike is going to fix that.
     
  8. copywrites

    copywrites New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    In checking your 600+ posts, Bordreux, I see you have the same problem with other posters. You read the posts and respond, but you don't read what what the poster was saying - you misinterpret, draw conclusions where none were stated or implied, etc. I would suggest a reading comprehension class. At least that would take up some of the time in your day since you somehow are able to post nearly 10 times a day, 365 days a year.

    I see no profession in your bio, so I have no idea what you do. But you might want to take a peek at mine, and then tell me more about your expertise in weight.

    But I agree, it is time to be out of this post. It takes way to much of my time responsing to your drivel, and it isn't helping the original poster too much.

    Finally, you validated my argument yourself in this last post. "Some factory wheels are good, some are not. " EXACTLY. Now the question is "Which came on the bike I just bought? Good or bad ones?". Based on my personal experience, my bikes have had more bad ones vs. good ones. But I learned my lesson - I never have to wonder because I don't wait for a wheel to fail before I act. I preempt the problem by using a known good wheel. Which was EXACTLY my original advice - buy a good, strong rear wheel. You have gone full circle, got lost in your own argument and ended up in mine. Well done chap. Carry on with your other posts.
     
  9. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    1
    David, (and indeed all)
    thanks for your thoughts on this. One tech question: "flip up" stem? Meaning just an easily adjustable stem? thanks.
     
  10. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    1
    David, (and indeed all)
    thanks for your thoughts on this. One tech question: "flip up" stem? Meaning just an easily adjustable stem? thanks.
     
  11. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Messages:
    2,763
    Likes Received:
    0
    I got lost in the thread of responses for a while... sorry.
    What I meant by flipping up the stem is most road stems are near level with a stem angle close to -17 degrees to make up for the steering tube angle of ~73 degrees. If you flip the stem up you raise the bar and shorten the reach. This higher bar height and shorter reach are often more comfortable to start with.
    Many stems come with removable end caps and some spacers below the stem. You can often swap a stem with the local shop to tune your ride height and reach. You may need to do this at the start..... if you are dealing with a little extra gut and or haven't established your riding condition as far as flexibility.
     
  12. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    1
    WOW! Guys this is the holidays! we need to get out on the road and relax...
    This string has some great info, and I really appreciate it. Some phrasing is a little harsh ("you gotta learn to ride before you race") but all good advice. I am looking at a 50 cm bike with BONTAGER ROAD SELECT 2004 700C BLACK AERO wheels. Actually come on the Leader bikes via the ebay store (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3649488365&category=7298) look like what the crowd suggest: not too heavy, and not too expensive.

    Thoughts welcome...
     
  13. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    1
    Oh one last thought: bike will be used only on (actually decent) New York roads. Central park, bike path, riverside drive. No t much off road planned here...
     
  14. eddiebrannan

    eddiebrannan New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2003
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    that "learn to ride' post was just dumb from start to finish. ignore it. 190 isn't huge and you don't need any special "heavyweight" type bike, even if such a thing existed. you don't need a riser stem, you don't need 36 spoke wheels. just buy the bike you like and have at it
     
  15. xc_gumby

    xc_gumby New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2003
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't see any problems here.... Flipping the stem up might be handy for extra comfort & less bending of the lower back,

    Get a proper bike fit from a cycling coach - spend the money its worth it.

    I'd always recommend built wheels on decent hubs (hugi, shimano, campag...) spoke count at around 32 with straight spokes at 14gauge. Not for any weight in particular just that this set-up is very durable. But I do recommend eyelets on the rim. I ride fairly cheap rims & they crack around the spoke holes after a while.

    But then again, I'm 168cm tall & weigh 68kg. What would I know?
     
Loading...
Loading...