Bike rack for the Office.. Suppliers?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by casurina99, Oct 11, 2004.

  1. casurina99

    casurina99 New Member

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    Hi All,

    I'm trying to get my company to install a rack so I can lock up my bike rather than leave it in the fire stairs.. There are 5 of us that ride regularly so we think we can get them to install a rack.

    Any idea of decent suppliers so I can ask for a quote and submit it all to the office manager??

    Thanks,

    Tom
     
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  2. PiledHigher

    PiledHigher New Member

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    Not sure where you are based but Bicycle victoria have a good range (and can do a quote)

    http://www.bv.com.au/Content/NavigationMenu/Cycling_Q_and_A/Bike_parking_products1/Default389.htm
     
  3. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    Tom wrote -
    >
    > I'm trying to get my company to install a rack so I can lock up my bike
    > rather than leave it in the fire stairs.. There are 5 of us that ride
    > regularly so we think we can get them to install a rack.
    >


    Been there done that, although in a "domestic" rather than office situation
    (12 bikes in the household, barely enough really).

    With the benefit of hindsight and having tried the commercial solutions
    (which become compromised in my view after 2 bikes) my suggestion is to stow
    the bikes vertically - my solution is -

    Fix a wooden batten to a convenient wall with wall anchors and removable
    screws - timber only has to be solid enough to accommodate and hold about
    3cm of a screw in hook on a 45 deg diagonal - I suggest one wall anchor per
    bike.

    Position the wood strip at a height where all users can hook a wheel into a
    screw in plastic coated hook (any hardware store, about $2 each) - separate
    the hooks by a little more than a handle bar width (will be wider for
    mountain bikes).

    With the benefit of hindsight, put in more hooks in than you presently have
    bikes (good also to hang other stuff like wheels to be repaired) - you may
    influence others to follow your deviant, car threatening ways.

    If security is an issue, fix a metal strip at typical bottom bracket height
    and attach some chains or plastic coated wire to thread through the wheels
    and frames of the bikes and "secure" with a padlock or bike lock - will
    deter amateur thieves and provide a little light amusement to professionals.

    If its a painted wall and someone cares about the paint you could put a
    third strip to keep the lower wheels off the wall but that's really anal.

    Cost should be less than $50 and less than an hours time for a home handy
    person to install.

    If you have to remove it its the cost of patching a few drill holes and some
    touch up paint.

    As I said, that's worked better and more flexibly for me than way more
    expensive store bought devices - look at what your LBS does to store bikes -
    most will adopt a variant of what I have proposed.

    The residual question of whether to hang by the front or rear wheel is more
    of a religious than an engineering question which you need to pose to your
    favourite guru - "there are many choices on the path to enlightenment
    grasshopper".

    best, Andrew
     
  4. Shabby

    Shabby New Member

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    While Andrew's ideas are good for a domestic situation (I have multiple wall mounted hooks in my house), you're more likely to have success pushing a solution which meets the Australian Standards (AS2890). While it will cost more, there's much less chance of any legal recourse should something go wrong, plus it will be a more secure solution for both protecting bikes from damage and protecting them from theft.

    BV are worth contacting, they have heaps of experience in optimising unused spaces.
     
  5. casurina99 wrote:
    >


    > Any idea of decent suppliers so I can ask for a quote and submit it all
    > to the office manager??


    Visit your local bicycle shop and ask if you can have a look through the
    Bicycle Oz trade list magazine. It has rack suppliers there. Or contact
    them direct.
     
  6. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    One ov BV's solutions is as per Andrew's suggestion but far easier to install and use
    (altho I might have a go at building his version for my place :) )
    Quite a few places in CBD melbourne use them (101 collins amongs others and BV themselves)
     
  7. flyingdutch wrote:

    > One ov BV's solutions is as per Andrew's suggestion but far easier to
    > install and use


    Unfortunately, that isn't a business solution.
    Only caters for a certain style of bicycle.
    Only caters for certain bicycle riders.
    Creates a dangerous situation.

    --
    Terry Collins {:)}}} email: terryc at woa.com.au www:
    http://www.woa.com.au
    Wombat Outdoor Adventures <Bicycles, Computers, GIS, Printing,
    Publishing>

    "People without trees are like fish without clean water"
     
  8. casurina99

    casurina99 New Member

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    OK THanks for the input.

    SO far I have:
    Corax - good cheap (relatively) stylish commercial racks. Sydney City Council uses them and BNSW recommends them.
    BV - Good utilitarian and cheaper racks. But freight is a real issue for interstate...
    Sefton - Safety supplier: Ugly racks, expensive, and sold by people who know nothing about bikes.
    Securabike - A company an architect friend suggested. Cheapish - No contact as yet.
    Andrews Homebuilt solution - Nice idea, but in the land of budgets, cost benifit analysis, insurance and registered tradesmen only, It just wont translate into my Office Managers head..

    I think the Corax stuff is the way to go for me.

    Thanks,

    Tom
     
  9. p_b_floyd

    p_b_floyd New Member

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  10. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    thousands would disagree Terry. And from the minagery(sp?) of bikes from mtbs to tandems, road bikes to 'bents I am yet to witness a bike that hasnt worked on them. And what's so dangerous? BV use them and they are just a copy of the millions spread around northern europe rail-stations...
     
  11. flyingdutch wrote:
    >
    > Terry Collins Wrote:
    > >
    > > Unfortunately, that isn't a business solution.
    > > Only caters for a certain style of bicycle.
    > > Only caters for certain bicycle riders.
    > > Creates a dangerous situation.
    > >

    >
    > thousands would disagree Terry. And from the minagery(sp?) of bikes
    > from mtbs to tandems, road bikes to 'bents I am yet to witness a bike
    > that hasnt worked on them. And what's so dangerous? BV use them and
    > they are just a copy of the millions spread around northern europe
    > rail-stations...


    1) Hanging a bicycle on a hook? Well, for a start, the rider has to be
    physically capable of lifting the bicycle into the air to hang them
    there. That is two problems, and doing so creates problems. Think about
    it.

    2) Thankfully all the idiots that eat at McDonalds don't determine what
    is good food.

    3) Thankfully BV isn't my state bicycle group, but then the same
    problems exist here.
     
  12. PiledHigher

    PiledHigher New Member

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    BV has about ten different solutions on there web page, vertical hanging is just one of them.
     
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