Bike Recommendations

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ydm9, Mar 11, 2004.

  1. "S o r n i" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > ydm9 wrote:
    > > Looking for bike recommendations. Prefer steel
    > > (absolutely no aluminum) frame. Will settle for Tiagra
    > > components. Prefer 9 speed. I have a short torso, so top
    > > tube length is an issue. Budget is $700. I prefer new
    > > bike suggestions as I look for used ones, but no luck
    > > yet. Any ideas?
    >
    > Visit your local bike shop.

    The number of bike shops that carry bikes such as he is
    looking for is small, so narrowing down the choices first is
    wise, beore driving all over.

    I.e., the four bike shops closest to me would not have a
    single bike that meets his requirements, even below
    Tiagra. One shop is Trek only (Trek/Lemond/Fisher), one
    is mainly Giant, one is very high end only, one
    concentrates on BMX with a few mountain bikes, but
    nothing steel in a road bike or mountain bike. There is
    an REI near me, without a single bike that meets his
    requirements as well. Ironically, Performance has bikes
    that will fit his requirements; much as I'd rather give
    money to locally owned shops, too many of them have gone
    down market, or only have steel bikes in the higher end,
    $1000+. I was at one local shop looking for a road bike,
    and the salesperson explained that they didn't have
    anything that fit my requirements because they only
    carried Trek's brands; fair enough, I guess that they
    get better pricing from Trek if they agree to be an
    exclusive Trek dealer, but don't go complaining about
    people shopping at Performance!

    > Bill "Fuji, perhaps?" S.

    Fuji is a good idea, as is Bianchi. These are not as widely
    available as Trek or Specialized. Performance carries Fuji,
    and some higher end shops carry Bianchi.
     


  2. On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 15:12:32 GMT, "Steven M. Scharf"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Other than a used bike or those two choices above, I
    >don't think that $700 is going to get you a new
    >chromolloy steel bike.
    >

    Jamis.

    www.jamisbikes.com

    I like my Aurora. I'm not sure that's what the OP is
    looking for. There's also the Satellite and the Quest. The
    latter is probably out of the price range, but I've seen at
    least one and it's a spiffy bike for the money. All three
    of those are steel ( first two are Reynolds 520, the latter
    is Reynolds 631)

    -Luigi
     
  3. "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Jamis.
    >
    > www.jamisbikes.com
    >
    > I like my Aurora. I'm not sure that's what the OP is
    > looking for. There's also the Satellite and the Quest. The
    > latter is probably out of the price range, but I've seen
    > at least one and it's a spiffy bike for the money. All
    > three of those are steel ( first two are Reynolds 520, the
    > latter is Reynolds 631)

    The problem with the Jamis models is the threadless
    headsets. The Bianchi and the Fuji have the older,
    adjustable quill headsets.

    The Bianchi Brava is around $510-600, the, Strada around $650-
    750. They're both Reynolds 520.

    If money is no object, then the Rivendell Romulus at $1500
    is about the optimum road bike for a decent price.
     
  4. On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 20:37:34 GMT, "Steven M. Scharf"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> Jamis.
    >>
    >> www.jamisbikes.com
    >>
    >> I like my Aurora. I'm not sure that's what the OP is
    >> looking for. There's also the Satellite and the Quest.
    >> The latter is probably out of the price range, but I've
    >> seen at least one and it's a spiffy bike for the money.
    >> All three of those are steel ( first two are Reynolds
    >> 520, the latter is Reynolds 631)
    >
    >The problem with the Jamis models is the threadless
    >headsets. The Bianchi and the Fuji have the older,
    >adjustable quill headsets.
    >

    True, this. My Aurora has an older quill stem in a threaded
    headset, though; and so far as I know the Aurora has not
    gone over to a threadless headset yet.

    The OP wasn't terribly specific about exactly what sort of
    frame he was looking for. Maybe the Aurora would do?

    >The Bianchi Brava is around $510-600, the, Strada around
    >$650-750. They're both Reynolds 520.

    Sound and look like neato bikes.

    >
    >If money is no object, then the Rivendell Romulus at $1500
    >is about the optimum road bike for a decent price.

    The Romulus is ceasing production, I believe. At around the
    same price range and geometry is Thorn's Audax Classic:

    http://www.sjscycles.com/thornbrochure.asp

    (look for the Audax Classic bit in the scheme)

    No dealers in the USA, sadly, but Thorn has a great
    reputation over in Britain. (Then again, Rivendell isn't
    exactly an LBS item either!)

    OK, enough bike porn.

    -Luigi
     
  5. I'm looking for a motor vehicle, any recommendations?

    The same answer applies. "What are you using it for?"

    Racing? Touring? Bikepacking? Endurance? Road? Mountain?
    Recreational use? Casual round-the-block Club rides (Fast?
    Slow?)? Cool factor? Commuting?

    "May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear
    for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  6. Dan Brussee

    Dan Brussee Guest

    Think about it. Your Giant bike probably has Shimano
    shifters. The Shimano shifter broke. All Giant can do is
    warrantee it, which I assume they did. Spokes break for many
    reasons, and it would certainly be unfair to blame the
    manufacturer of the bike for loose, tight or defective
    spokes unless it is a defect they knew about. About the only
    thing you should blame a bike manufacturer for is the frame,
    and even then they often have those supplied by a mass
    producer from China or Taiwan.

    Warantee the shifters, upgrade them if you think plastic is
    so evil, and have the wheels taken care of by a
    professional. Then go and ride and relax :)

    Dan

    On 13 Mar 2004 13:38:47 GMT, [email protected] (GABIKE) wrote:

    >>
    >>Just a friendly comment about Giant bikes - STAY AWAY. I
    >>managed last summer to break a rear spoke two separate
    >>times and also had my derailer shifter break (plastic
    >>insides). This is on a bike that in the two summers I rode
    >>is went about 900 miles total.
    >
    >I have a Giant OCR1, for the money its a outstanding
    >beginner bike. If you had it 2 years and only went 900
    >miles the failures were most likely a matter of neglect.
    >Any bike that gets ignored will have failures. Mine came
    >with 105 components, very reliable though a bit heavy, I
    >have upgraded and have about 50% ultegra on it now. Ive
    >broken a couple of spokes on my bike also but ive put
    >several thousand miles on it in the 3 years ive had
    >it. The biggest problem I have with Giant is that thay put
    > too many stickers on the frame. For my next bike im
    > torn between a trek 5200 and a Giant TCR elite. Ill
    > probibly just buy a frame and transfer my ultegra parts
    > and replace the 105 parts.
     
  7. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    GABIKE wrote ...

    >biggest problem I have with Giant is that thay put too many
    >stickers on the frame.

    Hairdryer, highest power setting, 2 minutes with a scraper,
    no stickers.

    best Andrew "no names" Price (who likes being asked about
    his custom frame which isn't really)
     
  8. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 20:37:34 GMT, "Steven M. Scharf"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >The problem with the Jamis models is the threadless
    >headsets. The Bianchi and the Fuji have the older,
    >adjustable quill headsets.

    This does not need to be a deal breaker. It's not hard to
    adjust...it's just different. Certainly no reason to avoid a
    bike that you would otherwise buy. OTOH, if the bike you
    want has threaded, great. It's a damn silly reason to
    disqualify a bike.

    Make sure you leave the bike shop with it at a good
    height, and maybe with a stem that provides for some
    adjustability w/o buying a new stem -- for example, a stem
    with a good rise to it, with all the spacers above it.
    That leaves adjustability both up and down without having
    to buy a new stem.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
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