Bike Repair Manual

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by rclouviere, Jan 28, 2014.

  1. rclouviere

    rclouviere New Member

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    I need some help to determine which bike repair manual is the best. I'm tired of taking my bike to the shop for everything. I know very, very little about bike repair, but would like to take this on.

    Any suggestions?

    Rick
     
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  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    http://www.parktool.com/product/big-blue-book-of-bicycle-repair-3rd-edition-BBB-3

    That's a start.

    Depending on your level of mechanical expertise, Zinn's book might work: http://www.amazon.com/Zinn-Art-Road-Bike-Maintenance/dp/1934030988

    There's a few other decent general repair books. Someone will chime in with their favorite(s).

    ETA: YouTube videos are awesome. There's several 'series' put out by a bike shops, wholesalers and manufacturers. YouTube searches work for me...save the video links that apply to your gear and profit!
     
  3. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    Bikes are simple machines and easy to work on - common sense alone should be sufficient to complete basic maintenance. The net has sufficient information to do all the required maintenance.

    As cBob already mentioned, Park Tool is a great resource. Sheldon Brown is also very good (http://sheldonbrown.com/).
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Yup...the "Ask A Mechanic" ( http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLe2rWZ6kNqvKKpTQoVEkw_JNf3whesHRL ) videos from Art's Cyclery &Velo News is just one of several informative and educational series on wrenching on bicycles.

    Excel Sports offers another great series on bike maintenance: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=excel%20sports&sm=3

    Still, I'm also a book junkie. The Park Blue Book is just great stuff. In addition to knowledge, where else can you find a resource that actually tells you to buy...MORE TOOLS?!?!?!

    Park's website has a great, albeit limited, series on maintenance.

    Since I run mainly Campy equipment on my bikes, I stock the entire Campagnolo technical library and can access specific information in it faster than I can get to the specific web page under most conditions. And it can be right beside my half-torn apart bike if need be...and I have needed it! (sweating bullets riveting your first 11-speed chain!)

    Sloane's book isn't too bad and there's Sutherland's for those wanting a more complete catalog of information on all types of bikes.
     
  5. rclouviere

    rclouviere New Member

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    Thanks for the responses. I'm very much a beginner, so, it looks like the Park manual may be my best bet?
     
  6. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the Park Tool book is a good start and worth the price IMO. Do watch the videos...it's a quick way to get the feel for the individual task entails (both tools and talent). Good luck!
     
  7. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    The 25th anniversary edition? This book must already be outdated, because I was reading the first or second edition around 1972.

    My favorite's the Park Blue Book, too.
     
  8. Scott2468

    Scott2468 Member

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    Better still, are you in a social group or bike club?

    Enjoy your riding and network.

    Before you know it you will have your bike with someone who loves to tinker, in their back yard working on your bike.

    You will learn plenty. They will have the knowledge to know exactly what to buy online. (this can be extremely confusing for newbies). You will learn what your bike's specific consumerables are. Most importantly, they will have the tools. You will learn how to use them and which ones to buy first. And you will get your bike fixed or maintained for the cost of a shared six pack.

    Beware, crack the six pack after your bike is done. If you're both powerfully parched, work on his bike.
     
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  9. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "The 25th anniversary edition?"

    I'm pretty sure it's outdated, also. Sutherland's excellent resource is outdated by the time of release. Still, it covers all but the latest whizzbang boy-racer stuff and in great detail. It's the one book with enough diagrams and pictures so that even the high school junior hired to work afternoons on the Cafe Madone's set of carbon fiber bank accounts ("My gears are making a funny noise...can you fix it?") can understand how to 'fix it'...sorta...kinda.

    7th Edition released 2004. You ain't gonna find out how to re-set a decoupled Campy 11-speed EPS Super Record rear derailleur or adjust hubs with CULT bearing specs in there...
     
  10. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    I just looked up Sloane's book on Amazon. I must have been reading the first edition (1970), which puts the 25th anniversary at 1995.

    One of the reviewers commented that he thought Sloane was overly opinionated. That's the way I remember the first edition. It took me 40 years to learn how to stop following his example.

    Still, you have to give him credit for staying reasonably on top of it for 25 years.
     
  11. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Eugene...overly opinionated? Nah! Just my not so humble opinion though.
     
  12. urge2kill

    urge2kill Member

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    I don't know much either.

    I got tired of reading through the SheldonBrown pages. I just skim them. They go into extensive detail on the anatomy, the different types, the history, the pros and cons, the myths, etc...

    YouTube has basic How-To videos. To avoid missing important info, watch two or three different videos, or look for the professional ones by bike shops.
     
  13. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Sheldon Brown works best as a reference source for esoterica, not a basic tutorial. Like finding out if you can make Shimano Di2 work with a Campagnolo cassette.
     
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