Bike Repair Stands



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E

Ed

Guest
I would like to buy a "good" bike repair stand for home use. I've looked on the web for a
comparitive review of the various stands but can't find any.

Does anyone know of such a review? If so, where (in the world) is it?

By "good", I mean one that holds the bike in the normal service positions, and doesn't fall over
while tweeking the bike.

Thanks,

Ed
 
D

David L. Johnso

Guest
On Fri, 05 Sep 2003 17:35:51 +0000, Ed wrote:

> By "good", I mean one that holds the bike in the normal service positions, and doesn't fall over
> while tweeking the bike.

In that case, don't get the one I got. I have the basic Park stand, and it will fall over backwards
if you are not careful. I lust after a better stand, but haven't justified the expense. Yet. It does
allow you to rotate the bike 360 degrees, and the jaw is good, but the height is not adjustable and
it is not adequately stable.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | More people object to wearing fur than leather because it is _`\(,_ | safer to harrass rich
white women than motorcycle gangs. (_)/ (_) |
 
B

Bgaudet0801

Guest
"Ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I would like to buy a "good" bike repair stand for home use. I've looked on the web for a
> comparitive review of the various stands but can't find any.

Funny coincidence. I was pricing them at the LBS today. I was kind of
surprised that they are in the cdn$200.00 range. Does that sound right?
 
E

Ed

Guest
David L. Johnson wrote:
> On Fri, 05 Sep 2003 17:35:51 +0000, Ed wrote:
>
>
>>By "good", I mean one that holds the bike in the normal service positions, and doesn't fall over
>>while tweeking the bike.
>
>
> In that case, don't get the one I got. I have the basic Park stand, and it will fall over
> backwards if you are not careful. I lust after a better stand, but haven't justified the expense.
> Yet. It does allow you to rotate the bike 360 degrees, and the jaw is good, but the height is not
> adjustable and it is not adequately stable.
>

I was considering Park, simply because of brand, but that's why I was looking for a comprehensive
review of many stands. Thanks for your input.

The only other style that I see is the Ultimate BRS-70. It has a tripod base that looks more stable,
but I don't know anything about the gripper end.

Ed
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
Sat, 06 Sep 2003 01:59:01 GMT, <[email protected]>,
"bgaudet0801" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
> Funny coincidence. I was pricing them at the LBS today. I was kind of
> surprised that they are in the cdn$200.00 range. Does that sound right?

The Ultimate stand mentioned by Ed was at MEC for awhile. Its wide tripod base is stable but the
clamp and clutch didn't inspire much confidence. It was $195. The Park is $225. (CDN)

Park makes a wide range of stands. Their professional models are the standard many bike shops.
They're priced twice as high as the home mechanic models. Park's best clamp mechanism can be
gotten less expensively by purchasing the wall or bench mounted pro clamps. The base should then
be plenty stable.
--
zk
 
J

Joe

Guest
On Fri, 05 Sep 2003 17:35:51 -0700, Ed <[email protected]> wrote:

>I would like to buy a "good" bike repair stand for home use. I've looked on the web for a
>comparitive review of the various stands but can't find any.
>
>Does anyone know of such a review? If so, where (in the world) is it?
>
>By "good", I mean one that holds the bike in the normal service positions, and doesn't fall over
>while tweeking the bike.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Ed

I purchased the Park PCS-4 at PerformanceBike.com a few weeks ago with a 20% off coupon. This bought
the $200 price down to $160 plus shipping.

The stand is rock solid, and the clamp and rotating mechanism are excellent. The new 2003 model is
fully adjustable from 54" to 72", which in my opinion is both not low enough and too high a range. I
would prefer just a bit lower and then find something to sit on while adjusting the der. But this is
not a big problem for me since I can do the same with my Home Depot wall mount, which I use daily
and cost me just $5.

I also liked the more expensive $250, Park PRS-5 Folding Workstand, which folds into a small
carrying case for storage and adjusts from 40" to 60", which in my opinion is a better range.

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/Profile.cfm?SKU=16489

You can try this coupon number 97181207 at checkout, supposedly expires 9/08.

IMHO the tripod models of other manufacturers invite either tripping over the legs or even knocking
the stand over.

Joe
 
C

Cat Dailey

Guest
"Ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I would like to buy a "good" bike repair stand for home use. I've looked on the web for a
> comparitive review of the various stands but can't find any.
>
> Does anyone know of such a review? If so, where (in the world) is it?
>

Guys...why do you persist in buying those crappy "clamp style" repair stands. Been there, done that
and finally got the Tacx repair stand that looks like a sawhorse which is super stable. Can clamp by
front fork with rear wheel on, can take the rear wheel off, perfect height to work on bikes, folds
flat, comes with a tool tray, has a doohickie thingie so that you can take the rear wheel off and
still run the chain, etc. And it's cheap-they are charging the exact same price as when I bought
mine 2-3 years ago! Take a looky here...this is where I bought mine.
http://www.chicagolandbicycle.com/tacx_workstand.htm

HTH, Cat
 
Z

Zippy The Pinhe

Guest
On Fri, 05 Sep 2003 20:03:37 -0700, Ed <[email protected]> wrote:

>> In that case, don't get the one I got. I have the basic Park stand, and it will fall over
>> backwards if you are not careful.

Put something heavy across the feet of it and it's OK. Using the deluxe head with the wide jaw
opening (for my recumbent) puts the weight of the bike far enough forward that this isn't necessary.
>
>The only other style that I see is the Ultimate BRS-70. It has a tripod base that looks more
>stable, but I don't know anything about the gripper end.

Before I got the Park, I had a Wrench Force one. If you attached the bike by the seat post like
you're supposed to, the gripper would turn around until the front wheel rested on the ground. Didn't
matter how hard you tightened the damn thing down either.
 
R

Ron Hardin

Guest
The Nashbar stand-by-me stand is good ($14) for just getting the rear wheel off the ground so you
can turn it, say to WD-40 a rain-soaked chain, without turning the bike over and dumping months'
worth of accumulated junk out of the milk crate on the rear rack.
--
Ron Hardin [email protected]

On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
 
E

Ed

Guest
Zoot Katz wrote:
> Sat, 06 Sep 2003 01:59:01 GMT, <[email protected]>,
> "bgaudet0801" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>Funny coincidence. I was pricing them at the LBS today. I was kind of surprised that they are in
>>the cdn$200.00 range. Does that sound right?
>
>
> The Ultimate stand mentioned by Ed was at MEC for awhile. Its wide tripod base is stable but the
> clamp and clutch didn't inspire much confidence. It was $195. The Park is $225. (CDN)
>
> Park makes a wide range of stands. Their professional models are the standard many bike shops.
> They're priced twice as high as the home mechanic models. Park's best clamp mechanism can be
> gotten less expensively by purchasing the wall or bench mounted pro clamps. The base should then
> be plenty stable.

Unfortunately, I don't have any wall area or bench space for a bike clamp. So, I will have to go
with a free-standing type.

At this point, I'm willing to spend about $150 (US) for a stand. The reason for the post is that
like most bike related purchases, you don't know what you will get (from a performance standpoint)
until you actually buy it. Then, it's usually too inconvenient to undo.

Ed
 
E

Ed

Guest
Joe wrote:

> On Fri, 05 Sep 2003 17:35:51 -0700, Ed <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>I would like to buy a "good" bike repair stand for home use. I've looked on the web for a
>>comparitive review of the various stands but can't find any.
>>
>>Does anyone know of such a review? If so, where (in the world) is it?
>>
>>By "good", I mean one that holds the bike in the normal service positions, and doesn't fall over
>>while tweeking the bike.
>>
>>Thanks,
>>
>>Ed
>
>
> I purchased the Park PCS-4 at PerformanceBike.com a few weeks ago with a 20% off coupon. This
> bought the $200 price down to $160 plus shipping.

That's about at my squeek point.

>
> The stand is rock solid, and the clamp and rotating mechanism are excellent. The new 2003 model is
> fully adjustable from 54" to 72", which in my opinion is both not low enough and too high a range.
> I would prefer just a bit lower and then find something to sit on while adjusting the der.

Again, this is the problem. Not having used a reapair stand before, I have no feel for good/bad
height. I do know that now, when I work on my bike on the floor while sitting on a one foot high
stool), I usually can't do what I want, and I end up with a sore back.

Last night, I tried suspending the bike from the beams in the garage. Forgetting the inconvenience
of hanging the bike, the swing factor made it less than ideal. Maybe if I bought a boat anchor to
stabilize the hanging bike, I've have the ideal repair setup.

But this is not a big problem for me since I can do
> the same with my Home Depot wall mount, which I use daily and cost me just $5.
>
> I also liked the more expensive $250, Park PRS-5 Folding Workstand, which folds into a small
> carrying case for storage and adjusts from 40" to 60", which in my opinion is a better range.

Too pricey for me (today)

>
> http://www.performancebike.com/shop/Profile.cfm?SKU=16489
>
> You can try this coupon number 97181207 at checkout, supposedly expires 9/08.
>
> IMHO the tripod models of other manufacturers invite either tripping over the legs or even
> knocking the stand over.
>

Back to my original post --- that's why I was hoping that someone had done a compartive review of
today's popular stands.

Ed

> Joe
>
>
 
E

Ed

Guest
Cat Dailey wrote:

> "Ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
>>I would like to buy a "good" bike repair stand for home use. I've looked on the web for a
>>comparitive review of the various stands but can't find any.
>>
>>Does anyone know of such a review? If so, where (in the world) is it?
>>
>
>
> Guys...why do you persist in buying those crappy "clamp style" repair stands. Been there, done
> that and finally got the Tacx repair stand that looks like a sawhorse which is super stable. Can
> clamp by front fork with rear wheel on, can take the rear wheel off, perfect height to work on
> bikes, folds flat, comes with a tool tray, has a doohickie thingie so that you can take the rear
> wheel off and still run the chain, etc. And it's cheap-they are charging the exact same price as
> when I bought mine 2-3 years ago! Take a looky here...this is where I bought mine.
> http://www.chicagolandbicycle.com/tacx_workstand.htm
>
> HTH, Cat
>
>

Interesting. I had not seen this one before. I did a google on it and got no hits. Apparently it's
only sold at chicagoland.

My only concern with this particular rig is that it looks like it has less flexibility than the
"normal" reapair stands.
 
E

Ed

Guest
Sat AM

OK. So here's what I've learned.

1 - There is no comprehensive bike stand review.

2 - The 2-leg (L-shaped) stands may be unstable, but can be stabilized by weighting down the legs
if needed.

3 - The tripod type stands may be more stable, but you are more likely to trip over the legs. (The
Ultimate brand doesn't seem to get anyone's vote so is probably no good.)

4 - The quality of the gripper (holding power) varies from brand to brand and probably model to
model. There is no good way to know if the gripper end works well until I buy one and try it.
Obviously, I will post the question once I pick a specific model, before I actually buy one.

5 - If/when I get over thinking that I need a repair stand, there are a couple cheaper devices that
make it considerably easier to tweek my bike.

Thanks,

Ed (gone biking)
 
C

Chris Neary

Guest
>Guys...why do you persist in buying those crappy "clamp style" repair stands. Been there, done that
>and finally got the Tacx repair stand that looks like a sawhorse which is super stable. Can clamp
>by front fork with rear wheel on, can take the rear wheel off, perfect height to work on bikes,
>folds flat, comes with a tool tray, has a doohickie thingie so that you can take the rear wheel off
>and still run the chain, etc.

I prefer the ability to rotate the bike for access to the bottom bracket area, etc.

No complaints about my Park Pro stand, though since it was a gift I didn't have to think about
sticker shock.

YMMV, of course.

Chris Neary [email protected]

"Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the
elements I loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
 
M

Michael

Guest
"Zippy the Pinhead" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> On Fri, 05 Sep 2003 20:03:37 -0700, Ed <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
> >> In that case, don't get the one I got. I have the basic Park stand,
and
> >> it will fall over backwards if you are not careful.
>
> Put something heavy across the feet of it and it's OK. Using the deluxe head with the wide jaw
> opening (for my recumbent) puts the weight of the bike far enough forward that this isn't
> necessary.
> >
> >The only other style that I see is the Ultimate BRS-70. It has a tripod base that looks more
> >stable, but I don't know anything about the gripper end.
>
> Before I got the Park, I had a Wrench Force one. If you attached the bike by the seat post like
> you're supposed to, the gripper would turn around until the front wheel rested on the ground.
> Didn't matter how hard you tightened the damn thing down either.

I have a WrenchForce too. It's ok for the most part, but I did manage to bend the large adjustment
screw. I straightened it out and haven't had a problem since. But the fact that it did bend would
give me pause to actually recommend this stand. I haven't tried any others.

It's light and stable. I haven't had any problems tightening it up so that the bike stays still. It
cost about $130.00.

M.
 
C

Cat Dailey

Guest
"Ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Cat Dailey wrote:
>
> > "Ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> >
> >>I would like to buy a "good" bike repair stand for home use. I've looked on the web for a
> >>comparitive review of the various stands but can't find any.
> >>
> >>Does anyone know of such a review? If so, where (in the world) is it?
> >>
> >
> >
> > Guys...why do you persist in buying those crappy "clamp style" repair stands. Been there, done
> > that and finally got the Tacx repair stand
that
> > looks like a sawhorse which is super stable. Can clamp by front fork
with
> > rear wheel on, can take the rear wheel off, perfect height to work on
bikes,
> > folds flat, comes with a tool tray, has a doohickie thingie so that you
can
> > take the rear wheel off and still run the chain, etc. And it's
cheap-they
> > are charging the exact same price as when I bought mine 2-3 years ago!
Take
> > a looky here...this is where I bought mine. http://www.chicagolandbicycle.com/tacx_workstand.htm
> >
> > HTH, Cat
> >
> >
>
> Interesting. I had not seen this one before. I did a google on it and got no hits. Apparently it's
> only sold at chicagoland.
>
> My only concern with this particular rig is that it looks like it has less flexibility than the
> "normal" reapair stands.
>
Why less flexibility? You can clamp the bike by either the front or rear dropouts. If in the front,
it's really easy to just lift up the whole bike if you need to clean the bottom bracket shell. IF by
the rear, you can run the chain on the spool-thingie and it works great. You can get super amounts
of leverage on it since the whole bike is supported, so if you need to tighten/loosen cranks or
pedals it works great. And it's the perfect height to work on bikes. Need I say more....you wanna
come to my house and try out mine??? :> (AND it's $114!)

HTH, Cat
 
M

Michael

Guest
Cat Dailey wrote:
> Guys...why do you persist in buying those crappy "clamp style" repair stands. Been there, done
> that and finally got the Tacx repair stand that looks like a sawhorse which is super stable. Can
> clamp by front fork with rear wheel on, can take the rear wheel off, perfect height to work on
> bikes, folds flat, comes with a tool tray, has a doohickie thingie so that you can take the rear
> wheel off and still run the chain, etc. And it's cheap-they are charging the exact same price as
> when I bought mine 2-3 years ago! Take a looky here...this is where I bought mine.
> http://www.chicagolandbicycle.com/tacx_workstand.htm
>
> HTH, Cat

Neato. I've been thinking ... off and on ... about how nice it would be to have a stand and how much
I want to avoid spending the $$$ for a pre-built one. The Tacx design lends itself to 2x4
construction. Thanks for the tip!
 
R

Rick Onanian

Guest
On Sat, 06 Sep 2003 22:26:52 GMT, Michael <[email protected]> wrote:
>> http://www.chicagolandbicycle.com/tacx_workstand.htm
>
> pre-built one. The Tacx design lends itself to 2x4 construction. Thanks

No kidding! Two or three 8' 2x4s, 12 nails, and a $20 fork mount. Hell, even I can afford that!

For that matter, I can just screw a fork mount into...a sawhorse! Of course, I have no place
to put it.

--
Rick Onanian
 
E

Ed

Guest
Cat Dailey wrote:

----cut---

> Why less flexibility? You can clamp the bike by either the front or rear dropouts. If in the
> front, it's really easy to just lift up the whole bike if you need to clean the bottom bracket
> shell. IF by the rear, you can run the chain on the spool-thingie and it works great. You can get
> super amounts of leverage on it since the whole bike is supported, so if you need to
> tighten/loosen cranks or pedals it works great. And it's the perfect height to work on bikes. Need
> I say more....you wanna come to my house and try out mine??? :> (AND it's $114!)
>
> HTH, Cat
>
>

Maybe this IS the Cat's Meow !!

Ed
 
D

David L. Johnso

Guest
On Sat, 06 Sep 2003 17:18:38 +0000, Cat Dailey wrote:

>> My only concern with this particular rig is that it looks like it has less flexibility than the
>> "normal" reapair stands.
>>
> Why less flexibility?

With even my not-so great Park stand, I can easily rotate the bike upside down while it is clamped,
to get at the cable guides (to lube them) or to clean under there. Quite a useful feature.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | The lottery is a tax on those who fail to understand _`\(,_ | mathematics. (_)/ (_) |
 
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