bike suggestion

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by ken, Aug 13, 2004.

  1. ken

    ken Guest

    I am looking forward to getting opinions on road bikes.

    What is a good sport road bike that:

    1. Is fairly light, but very durable.

    2. Has drop bars.

    3. Is Comfortable.

    4. Has eyelets on the frame for a rack.

    5. Used for city commuting and errands, not racing.

    6. Good for light touring.

    7. No oddball parts that are hard to find and replace.

    8. Has good quality components.

    9. Built to last.

    10. A good value.


    Thanks in advance
    Ken
     
    Tags:


  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (ken) wrote in news:b22dd29d.0408130940.58ae325
    @posting.google.com:

    > I am looking forward to getting opinions on road bikes.
    >
    > What is a good sport road bike that:
    >
    > 1. Is fairly light, but very durable.
    >
    > 2. Has drop bars.
    >
    > 3. Is Comfortable.
    >
    > 4. Has eyelets on the frame for a rack.


    Get something with a steel fork, like the Trek 520.
     
  3. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I am looking forward to getting opinions on road bikes.
    >
    > What is a good sport road bike that:
    >
    > 1. Is fairly light, but very durable.
    >
    > 2. Has drop bars.
    >
    > 3. Is Comfortable.
    >
    > 4. Has eyelets on the frame for a rack.
    >
    > 5. Used for city commuting and errands, not racing.
    >
    > 6. Good for light touring.
    >
    > 7. No oddball parts that are hard to find and replace.
    >
    > 8. Has good quality components.
    >
    > 9. Built to last.
    >
    > 10. A good value.


    The Jamis Aurora meets all those criteria, although I don't know how you
    personally assess "value," and comfort is not only subjective but also a
    product of the interplay between a bike's geometry and your own physique,
    something nobody can evaluate but you and/or an experienced bike fitter.

    There are also a number of cyclocross bikes that would fill the bill.

    RichC
     
  4. On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 14:42:03 -0400, "Rich Clark"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> I am looking forward to getting opinions on road bikes.
    >>
    >> What is a good sport road bike that:
    >>
    >> 1. Is fairly light, but very durable.
    >>
    >> 2. Has drop bars.
    >>
    >> 3. Is Comfortable.
    >>
    >> 4. Has eyelets on the frame for a rack.
    >>
    >> 5. Used for city commuting and errands, not racing.
    >>
    >> 6. Good for light touring.
    >>
    >> 7. No oddball parts that are hard to find and replace.
    >>
    >> 8. Has good quality components.
    >>
    >> 9. Built to last.
    >>
    >> 10. A good value.

    >
    >The Jamis Aurora meets all those criteria, although I don't know how you
    >personally assess "value," and comfort is not only subjective but also a
    >product of the interplay between a bike's geometry and your own physique,
    >something nobody can evaluate but you and/or an experienced bike fitter.


    The Aurora (or its close competitor, the Fuji Touring) will fit that
    bill well, yes.

    The Jamis Nova--the cyclocross bike in the Jamis line--will fit the
    bill well, as well. It's a bit sportier in geometry than the Aurora,
    and may or may not have a higher bottom bracket--I haven't ridden one
    personally. Any of these will have enough clearance for sensible
    tires and fenders.

    If fenders aren't a major issue for you, there are slightly sportier
    bikes that may just fit the bill. The Fuji Ace, for instance, has
    rack mounts brazed onto the frame. It has fender eyelets, but I'm
    skeptical (at best) about clearances with fenders.

    I'm the resident Jamis Aurora fan on this NG (I have a 2001 model) and
    I love it. It does everything I want it to very well.

    -Luigi

    >There are also a number of cyclocross bikes that would fill the bill.
    >
    >RichC
    >
     
  5. Pat

    Pat Guest


    > I am looking forward to getting opinions on road bikes.

    \

    Bianchi Eros.

    Pat in TX
     
  6. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 14:42:03 -0400, Rich Clark wrote:

    > There are also a number of cyclocross bikes that would fill the bill.
    >
    > RichC


    That gets my vote too--you get the drop bars, durable wheels and clearance
    for fenders because of the canti brakes. Parts are usually a mix between
    mtb and road stuff--nothing usually wierd.

    I'd replace the cyclocross knobbies with proper 28-32 wide road tires.

    If you've got the bucks then something like a Rivendell or Waterford frame
    with long reach sidepull brakes and your choice of components is elegant,
    practical, durable, and again quite expensive.

    Also have a look at the REI Randonee--it runs around 800 dollars and is
    one of the few affordable "touring" bikes around these days. Braze ons for
    everything. It looks a lot like a cyclocross ride, but with a better road
    geometry and larger frame.
     
  7. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]

    > Also have a look at the REI Randonee--it runs around 800 dollars and is
    > one of the few affordable "touring" bikes around these days. Braze ons for
    > everything. It looks a lot like a cyclocross ride, but with a better road
    > geometry and larger frame.


    My 2000 Randonee is a great bike that has accumulated about 8000 miles,
    mostly urban/suburban commuting. It, like other steel touring bikes that
    have been mentioned, fits the OP's criteria in most respects. But it's not
    particularly light. The newer version may be lighter, I don't know.

    My 2001 Airborne Carpe Diem is a cyclocross frame set up as a light
    tourer/commuter bike. Even with its touring wheels and cro-mo fork, it's
    noticeably lighter than the Novara (the ti frame, the higher-end components,
    it all adds up) and just more fun to ride. It does the same commute (usually
    about 10% faster) and it's my favorite bike for long rides in the country.

    Of my three bikes (#3 is an '03 Fuji Roubaix Pro) the Airborne is the one
    I'd keep if I could only keep one. It's as close to the perfect all-around
    bike that I can imagine.

    RichC
     
  8. dreaded

    dreaded Guest

    "Rich Clark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    >
    > > Also have a look at the REI Randonee--it runs around 800 dollars and is
    > > one of the few affordable "touring" bikes around these days. Braze ons

    for
    > > everything. It looks a lot like a cyclocross ride, but with a better

    road
    > > geometry and larger frame.

    >
    > My 2000 Randonee is a great bike that has accumulated about 8000 miles,
    > mostly urban/suburban commuting. It, like other steel touring bikes that
    > have been mentioned, fits the OP's criteria in most respects. But it's not
    > particularly light. The newer version may be lighter, I don't know.
    >
    > My 2001 Airborne Carpe Diem is a cyclocross frame set up as a light
    > tourer/commuter bike. Even with its touring wheels and cro-mo fork, it's
    > noticeably lighter than the Novara (the ti frame, the higher-end

    components,
    > it all adds up) and just more fun to ride. It does the same commute

    (usually
    > about 10% faster) and it's my favorite bike for long rides in the country.
    >
    > Of my three bikes (#3 is an '03 Fuji Roubaix Pro) the Airborne is the one
    > I'd keep if I could only keep one. It's as close to the perfect all-around
    > bike that I can imagine.
    >
    > RichC
    >
    >

    i have the 2003 REI (novara) strada and find it very comfortable for long
    torso. it's got the three rings and some rack braze-ons. there is limited
    space for fenders but with a little tweaking they'll fit (i run 25's). i
    really like the alum frame/carbon fork combo. sometimes wish i had a light
    cyclocross bike i could hop curbs with but cant have everything...yet. has
    anyone else tried this bike?
     
  9. "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > i have the 2003 REI (novara) strada and find it very comfortable for long
    > torso.


    Which is probably why I feel too stretched out, even with a very short stem,
    on the same bike (2000 model)

    > it's got the three rings and some rack braze-ons. there is limited
    > space for fenders but with a little tweaking they'll fit (i run 25's). i
    > really like the alum frame/carbon fork combo.


    Yours came with the carbon fork? I put one on mine after my husband crashed
    it into the roof of the garage when it was on the roof rack a while back.

    > sometimes wish i had a light
    > cyclocross bike i could hop curbs with but cant have everything...yet. has
    > anyone else tried this bike?


    I've seriously considered cyclocross on this same bike, at least on the
    beginner level. I have cyclocross tires on it anyway, for commuting
    purposes. I've certainly taken it off road enough. I used to take it through
    Robinswood park every day through the summer when my kids had summer camp
    there four years ago. It does fine on hard-packed smooth trails like they
    have there, crashing through the doug firs no problem.


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  10. dreaded

    dreaded Guest


    >
    > I've seriously considered cyclocross on this same bike, at least on the
    > beginner level. I have cyclocross tires on it anyway, for commuting
    > purposes. I've certainly taken it off road enough. I used to take it

    through
    > Robinswood park every day through the summer when my kids had summer camp
    > there four years ago. It does fine on hard-packed smooth trails like they
    > have there, crashing through the doug firs no problem.
    >

    thanks...Ya it came with carbon fork. ...what size tires could you fit?
    maybe i sould just get some spare wheels instead of another bike!
    -alan
     
  11. "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > thanks...Ya it came with carbon fork. ...what size tires could you fit?
    > maybe i sould just get some spare wheels instead of another bike!


    I think they're 28s on there now, but I've had 32s in the past.


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
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