Bike suggestions

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Archer, May 30, 2003.

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  1. Archer

    Archer Guest

    I've done quite a bit of research to find models of bikes which have the features and components I
    want at a price I can afford, and have narrowed it down to 4 models. I would welcome any comments,
    especially on your experience with the durability, maintainability and reliability of these models.

    I haven't yet taken any of them out for a ride, and that will of course be the final determining
    factor, but I would like comments. There are at least two LBS' for each mmanufacturer, and I
    have had good experiences with all of them while asking questions, so that appears to be a non-
    factor as well.

    This is in order of my current rankings, but nothing is final yet, and these can easily change:

    Specialized Sequoiah Expert Bianchi San Remo Fuji Touring Bianchi Volpe

    Any and all comments gratefully accepted!

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
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  2. Pbwalther

    Pbwalther Guest

    Well I dunno. It depends on what you want out of a bike and you have not stated that so it is
    impossible to give you much advice.

    I have looked at a Specialized Sequoiah Expert. It is a nice looking bike and looks well thought out
    and planned. The purpose of this bike is to maximize rider comfort at the cost of some performance.
    For a competitive cyclist or cyclist interested in maximum performance, this bike is a poor choice.
    For a ride who wants a serious bicycle that is easy on the rider, this bike is an excellent choice.

    You also have down the Fuji Touring Bike. That is a whole other category then the Specialized
    Sequoiah Expert. Obviously, if you are going to do self contained touring, you pick the Fuji over
    the Sequoiah. If you are interested in comfort, the Sequoiah over the Touring bike.

    The question you asked is a lot like what is the best shoe in the world? Well the answer is one that
    fits your feet and is designed to do what you want. Same thing is true for bicycles.
     
  3. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Well I dunno. It depends on what you want out of a bike and you have not stated that so it is
    > impossible to give you much advice.
    >
    > I have looked at a Specialized Sequoiah Expert. It is a nice looking bike and looks well thought
    > out and planned. The purpose of this bike is to maximize rider comfort at the cost of some
    > performance. For a competitive cyclist or cyclist interested in maximum performance, this bike is
    > a poor choice. For a ride who wants a serious bicycle that is easy on the rider, this bike is an
    > excellent choice.
    >
    > You also have down the Fuji Touring Bike. That is a whole other category then the Specialized
    > Sequoiah Expert. Obviously, if you are going to do self contained touring, you pick the Fuji over
    > the Sequoiah. If you are interested in comfort, the Sequoiah over the Touring bike.
    >
    > The question you asked is a lot like what is the best shoe in the world? Well the answer is one
    > that fits your feet and is designed to do what you want. Same thing is true for bicycles.

    Read my whole post again, not just the subject <GG>. I asked for comments on durability, reliability
    and maintainability, not on "which is the best bike for me". I have determined that all of these
    will meet my needs, which implies that I'm not going to be doing loaded touring or hard-core racing
    with them, since some of them aren't appropriate for those kinds of uses. I just want to know if
    anybody has good or bad experience with the "reliability" (in broad terms) of these bikes.

    If it helps, my expected usage includes occasional commuting over good roads, riding for fun and
    exercise, trips to the store for just a few items, and the occasional Monday night or Columbus day
    race. I want drop bars, brifters, a reasonably comfortable ride as long as I don't give up too much
    performance, and the ability to put on fenders for wet-weather (but not snow and ice) riding.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  4. Melisa Johns

    Melisa Johns Guest

    > Any and all comments gratefully accepted!
    I hope so.

    > Specialized Sequoiah Expert
    Good bike.

    > Bianchi San Remo
    Another good bike.

    > Fuji Touring
    Another good bike. Lower price, lower grade components. Just as good for your purposes
    > Bianchi Volpe
    A good bike and a different bike.

    Look at a Surly Cross check. Available as a complete bike or buildup. Look at:

    http://www.excelsports.com/catalog/10.pdf

    How about $1199 for a Ultra group complete bike? $40 more for triple. There are less expensive
    groups of course, but you did not say your budget.

    Anything you buy breaks down to the different parts. So much for the frame. And so much for
    the components. Good wheels and hubs cost more than cheaper wheels and hubs. If you pay less,
    you get less.
     
  5. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, rubyebby[email protected] says...
    > > Any and all comments gratefully accepted!
    > I hope so.
    >
    > > Specialized Sequoiah Expert
    > Good bike.
    >
    > > Bianchi San Remo
    > Another good bike.
    >
    > > Fuji Touring
    > Another good bike. Lower price, lower grade components. Just as good for your purposes

    Any ideas how the "lower grade" components will affect the bike's reliability?

    > > Bianchi Volpe
    > A good bike and a different bike.
    >
    > Look at a Surly Cross check. Available as a complete bike or buildup. Look at:
    >
    > http://www.excelsports.com/catalog/10.pdf
    >
    > How about $1199 for a Ultra group complete bike? $40 more for triple. There are less expensive
    > groups of course, but you did not say your budget.

    $1200 is the extreme top end of my budget; I'd like to stay below $1100 if possible. The CrossCheck
    looks like a nice bike; if it had brifters and larger chain rings, I would have to give it a
    serious look.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  6. Melisa Johns

    Melisa Johns Guest

    > $1200 is the extreme top end of my budget; I'd like to stay below $1100 if possible. The
    > CrossCheck looks like a nice bike; if it had brifters and larger chain rings, I would have to give
    > it a serious look.

    Then your bike is a phone call away. Brifter about $200 more and 105 group $100 less. But don't ask
    me or the group. Call the company you want to buy it from.

    Brifters instead of barcons? Not for my bike.
     
  7. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > > $1200 is the extreme top end of my budget; I'd like to stay below $1100 if possible. The
    > > CrossCheck looks like a nice bike; if it had brifters and larger chain rings, I would have to
    > > give it a serious look.
    >
    > Then your bike is a phone call away. Brifter about $200 more and 105 group $100 less. But don't
    > ask me or the group. Call the company you want to buy it from.
    >
    > Brifters instead of barcons? Not for my bike.

    To each his/her own! Thanks for the comments.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  8. On Fri, 30 May 2003, archer wrote:

    > I've done quite a bit of research to find models of bikes which have the features and components
    > I want at a price I can afford, and have narrowed it down to 4 models. I would welcome any
    > comments, especially on your experience with the durability, maintainability and reliability of
    > these models.
    >

    [snip]

    > This is in order of my current rankings, but nothing is final yet, and these can easily change:
    >
    > Specialized Sequoiah Expert Bianchi San Remo Fuji Touring Bianchi Volpe
    >

    David,

    The Specialized has arguably the nicest specs of the four, though I detest its faux-racerboy wheels.
    The other three bikes on your list come standard with a mix of lower-end Shimano or Campy
    components. Having said that, you're going to find little if any difference between the four in
    terms of your stated criteria. The Fuji Touring, being designed for full-on loaded touring, is going
    to have the beefiest wheels and will likely be the most rugged of the lot, but probably won't feel
    as lively as the Specialized. Whether it is in fact as lively is another question entirely. If you
    think you might do cycle camping at some point in the future, go for the Fuji, and otherwise let
    bike fit and general rideability decide it for you.

    Have fun test riding them all!

    Trent

    > Any and all comments gratefully accepted!
    >
    > --
    > David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord, it's
    > morning".
    >
    > Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  9. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <Pine.A41.4.44.0305310005430.52494-100000 @homer23.u.washington.edu>,
    [email protected] says...

    ...

    > > Specialized Sequoiah Expert Bianchi San Remo Fuji Touring Bianchi Volpe
    > >
    >
    > David,
    >
    > The Specialized has arguably the nicest specs of the four, though I detest its faux-racerboy
    > wheels. The other three bikes on your list come

    I don't care much for those wheels either, but I might be able to get the shop to swap them out for
    something more "main stream", which might still get me home if I break a spoke. IMO, by far the
    ugliest of the bunch is the Volpe. That paint job looks like a kid's bike.

    ...

    > Have fun test riding them all!

    I plan to!

    ....

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  10. Jkinney2

    Jkinney2 Guest

    I ride a 2000 Bianchi Volpe. It has been to work and back everyday since I got it,( minus really
    bad snow days) and rode on the weekends for touring or just getting the heck out of Dodge. I
    currently have a bit over 10,000 trouble free miles on the thing. That is if you dont count this
    winter and the rear derailuer freezing up and me breaking the shifter cable trying to shift. Hope
    this helps a little.

    Jim
     
  11. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I ride a 2000 Bianchi Volpe. It has been to work and back everyday since I got it,( minus really
    > bad snow days) and rode on the weekends for touring or just getting the heck out of Dodge. I
    > currently have a bit over 10,000 trouble free miles on the thing. That is if you dont count this
    > winter and the rear derailuer freezing up and me breaking the shifter cable trying to shift. Hope
    > this helps a little.

    It does! Thanks for the comments.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
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