Bike theft/vandalism

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by David Wood, Oct 20, 2003.

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  1. David Wood

    David Wood Guest

    I leave my bike at at a rail station and recently had the seat stolen. Hard to believe that
    someone is so desperate...or more likely a kind of vandalism. I thought I was ahead of the game by
    using an allen key to secure the seat post (instead of those useless release things) however the
    thief came prepared-but couldn't get the seat post out. So he used the allen key to get the seat
    off its mounting.

    Now I've put a large jubilee clip around the allen bolt on the seat and plan to hacksaw the
    screwhead off. The seat post I bought one of those bolts with a combination needing its own special
    tool. I also now lock both wheels to the frame.

    Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    preventitive measures?

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  2. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:57:04 +0000, David Wood wrote:

    >
    > Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    > preventitive measures?
    I guess bike lockers are the answer. I guess also though that at main line stations not enough can
    be installed to cope with demand - I recently saw the bike racks at Waterloo station entrance
    bulging with bikes.

    The Wetlands Centre at Barnes has some impressive bike cages too - you use your own D-lock to
    secure the door.

    Or of course cutting off the googlies of bike vandals.
     
  3. Elyob

    Elyob Guest

    "David Wood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I leave my bike at at a rail station and recently had the seat stolen.
    Hard
    > to believe that someone is so desperate...or more likely a kind of vandalism. I thought I was
    > ahead of the game by using an allen key to
    secure
    > the seat post (instead of those useless release things) however the thief came prepared-but
    > couldn't get the seat post out. So he used the allen
    key
    > to get the seat off its mounting.
    >
    > Now I've put a large jubilee clip around the allen bolt on the seat and
    plan
    > to hacksaw the screwhead off. The seat post I bought one of those bolts
    with
    > a combination needing its own special tool. I also now lock both wheels to the frame.
    >
    > Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    > preventitive measures?
    >

    Seat comes with me. Unfortunately these sort of crimes are most probably other cyclists, who left
    their bike out and had their seat stolen. What goes around, comes around. In fact, anything which is
    removable is either secured or taken with me.

    I also think that the fact I have removed the seat makes the bike look like it's carefully locked,
    therefore they look for easier targets.
     
  4. David Wood wrote:

    > I leave my bike at at a rail station and recently had the seat stolen. Hard to believe that
    > someone is so desperate...or more likely a kind of vandalism. I thought I was ahead of the game by
    > using an allen key to secure the seat post (instead of those useless release things) however the
    > thief came prepared-but couldn't get the seat post out. So he used the allen key to get the seat
    > off its mounting.
    >
    > Now I've put a large jubilee clip around the allen bolt on the seat and plan to hacksaw the
    > screwhead off. The seat post I bought one of those bolts with a combination needing its own
    > special tool. I also now lock both wheels to the frame.
    >
    > Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    > preventitive measures?

    Use a really crap bike instead?

    The seat QR is a weird hangover from the Mt. Tamalpais days of mountain biking (the Repackers would
    drop the seat right down before the descents because they didn't pedal anyway), and is completely
    pointless for most riders.
     
  5. David Wood wrote:

    > I leave my bike at at a rail station and recently had the seat stolen. Hard to believe that
    > someone is so desperate...or more likely a kind of vandalism. I thought I was ahead of the game by
    > using an allen key to secure the seat post (instead of those useless release things) however the
    > thief came prepared-but couldn't get the seat post out. So he used the allen key to get the seat
    > off its mounting.
    >
    > Now I've put a large jubilee clip around the allen bolt on the seat and plan to hacksaw the
    > screwhead off. The seat post I bought one of those bolts with a combination needing its own
    > special tool. I also now lock both wheels to the frame.
    >
    > Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    > preventitive measures?

    Use a really crap bike instead?

    The seat QR is a weird hangover from the Mt. Tamalpais days of mountain biking (the Repackers would
    drop the seat right down before the descents because they didn't pedal anyway), and is completely
    pointless for most riders.
     
  6. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "David Wood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    > preventative measures?

    When I used to leave my bike outside pubs, I'd carry a long coiled up bike lock as well as the U
    lock for the wheels and frame. I'd feed the coiled one through the seat rails and onto the other
    wheel. I still got a seat clamp nicked, but they couldn't get at the seat.

    Like this: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=4000000001

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  7. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "David Wood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    > preventative measures?

    When I used to leave my bike outside pubs, I'd carry a long coiled up bike lock as well as the U
    lock for the wheels and frame. I'd feed the coiled one through the seat rails and onto the other
    wheel. I still got a seat clamp nicked, but they couldn't get at the seat.

    Like this: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=4000000001

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  8. Ouch

    Ouch Guest

    >I leave my bike at at a rail station and recently had the seat stolen. Hard to believe that someone
    >is so desperate...or more likely a kind of vandalism. I thought I was ahead of the game by using an
    >allen key to secure the seat post (instead of those useless release things) however the thief came
    >prepared-but couldn't get the seat post out. So he used the allen key to get the seat off its
    >mounting.
    >
    >Now I've put a large jubilee clip around the allen bolt on the seat and plan to hacksaw the
    >screwhead off. The seat post I bought one of those bolts with a combination needing its own special
    >tool. I also now lock both wheels to the frame.

    <snip>

    I'm very sorry to hear you had your saddle stolen.

    I'm not sure that seatposts are that useful to a thief anyway? There seem to be so many diameters
    available that thieves would have to go through quite a few to actually find the right size. I don't
    know whether they know that though so your probably right to err on the side of caution.
     
  9. Ouch

    Ouch Guest

    >I leave my bike at at a rail station and recently had the seat stolen. Hard to believe that someone
    >is so desperate...or more likely a kind of vandalism. I thought I was ahead of the game by using an
    >allen key to secure the seat post (instead of those useless release things) however the thief came
    >prepared-but couldn't get the seat post out. So he used the allen key to get the seat off its
    >mounting.
    >
    >Now I've put a large jubilee clip around the allen bolt on the seat and plan to hacksaw the
    >screwhead off. The seat post I bought one of those bolts with a combination needing its own special
    >tool. I also now lock both wheels to the frame.

    <snip>

    I'm very sorry to hear you had your saddle stolen.

    I'm not sure that seatposts are that useful to a thief anyway? There seem to be so many diameters
    available that thieves would have to go through quite a few to actually find the right size. I don't
    know whether they know that though so your probably right to err on the side of caution.
     
  10. Mary

    Mary Guest

    If you can find a ship's chandler they will make up a cable to your spec. Probably not bolt cutter
    proof but enough to deter casual thieves "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "David Wood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    > > preventative measures?
    >
    > When I used to leave my bike outside pubs, I'd carry a long coiled up
    bike
    > lock as well as the U lock for the wheels and frame. I'd feed the coiled
    one
    > through the seat rails and onto the other wheel. I still got a seat clamp nicked, but they
    > couldn't get at the seat.
    >
    > Like this: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=4000000001
    >
    > --
    > Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  11. Mary

    Mary Guest

    If you can find a ship's chandler they will make up a cable to your spec. Probably not bolt cutter
    proof but enough to deter casual thieves "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "David Wood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    > > preventative measures?
    >
    > When I used to leave my bike outside pubs, I'd carry a long coiled up
    bike
    > lock as well as the U lock for the wheels and frame. I'd feed the coiled
    one
    > through the seat rails and onto the other wheel. I still got a seat clamp nicked, but they
    > couldn't get at the seat.
    >
    > Like this: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=4000000001
    >
    > --
    > Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  12. Roos Eisma

    Roos Eisma Guest

    "David Wood" <[email protected]> writes:

    >Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    >preventitive measures?

    Strangest part theft I have had: my Dutch city hack used to have elastic bands for the carrier rack
    that were attached to a metal plate that went onto the rear axis. That wheel was secured with bolts,
    not quick release. One day I needed new ones and went for the nice purple ones instead of standard
    black. Slightly more expensive but still costing less than one pound... A day later I took my bike
    out of the rack at the station and noticed that the rear wheel seemed wobbly. On closer inspection:
    someone had unbolted the wheel, removed the binders, and put the wheel back in without really
    tightening the bolts.

    For some reason thiefs always target something that I was really happy about, even if it hasn't much
    actual value... Like the cheapo n-hand bike that I had spraypainted a really nice kingfisher
    metallic blue :(

    Roos
     
  13. Al_mossah

    Al_mossah Guest

    Same thing happened to me at Chippenham station, despite my seat being old and tatty. I had a
    "Quick-steal" fitting on, so they didn't have much work to do. Having finally got the correct size
    seat post, I have secured it to the bike with a 1.8m long 8mm Master-Lock from B&Q, £3.99. Not in
    every branch, however.

    I have also taken to looking at cycle-seats left at the station with a suspicious eye, and when I
    see one that I recognise I suspect I'll attach it to the post with my Master Lock!

    Peter.

    "David Wood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I leave my bike at at a rail station and recently had the seat stolen.
    Hard
    > to believe that someone is so desperate...or more likely a kind of vandalism. I thought I was
    > ahead of the game by using an allen key to
    secure
    > the seat post (instead of those useless release things) however the thief came prepared-but
    > couldn't get the seat post out. So he used the allen
    key
    > to get the seat off its mounting.
    >
    > Now I've put a large jubilee clip around the allen bolt on the seat and
    plan
    > to hacksaw the screwhead off. The seat post I bought one of those bolts
    with
    > a combination needing its own special tool. I also now lock both wheels to the frame.
    >
    > Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    > preventitive measures?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.528 / Virus Database: 324 - Release Date: 16/10/2003
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>, Roos Eisma wrote:
    >"David Wood" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >>Bikes seem to be more vulnerable to this kind of thing. Anyone else have similar experiences or
    >>preventitive measures?
    >
    >Strangest part theft I have had: my Dutch city hack used to have elastic bands for the carrier rack
    >that were attached to a metal plate that went onto the rear axis.

    I once had light mounting clip stolen (unscrewed from round the seatpost). The light that was in the
    clip (up against the underside of the saddle mounting so it couldn't be taken out without unscrewing
    the clip) was left lying on the rack.
     
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