Bike Tip

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Urban Bettag, May 8, 2003.

  1. Urban Bettag

    Urban Bettag Guest

    I have done three triathlons last year and plan to do some more in the summer. Many years ago I used
    to be a competitive cyclist and mainly used a sat-back road racing position. Also I did quite a lot
    of running this year. At T2 I always had problems getting up the pace and ended up with a very poor
    run. Hence, I was wondering if the saddle position has any effect on the running. Are there any
    recommendations on the saddle set-back? Do you use different saddle positions for different
    distances (sprint vs. long distance)? Further, when you train, do you mainly bike after a run, or do
    you run after the bike and if so for how long?

    Thanks in advance, Urban
     
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  2. Urban Bettag wrote:
    >
    > I have done three triathlons last year and plan to do some more in the summer. Many years ago I
    > used to be a competitive cyclist and mainly used a sat-back road racing position. Also I did quite
    > a lot of running this year. At T2 I always had problems getting up the pace and ended up with a
    > very poor run. Hence, I was wondering if the saddle position has any effect on the running. Are
    > there any recommendations on the saddle set-back? Do you use different saddle positions for
    > different distances (sprint vs. long distance)?

    Runners and triathletes generally prefer a more forward saddle position than cyclists. This is
    because the further forward you go, the more emphasis is placed on the backs of the legs and less on
    the quadriceps at the front. Since runners tend to have better developed hamstrings, they want to be
    able to make use of them on the bike, hence the more forward position. It also lends itself to
    better aerodynamics.

    > Further, when you train, do you mainly bike after a run, or do you run after the bike and if so
    > for how long?

    If you're practicing for a triathlon, it makes sense to train your run directly after your bike
    on a regular basis, if you're not doing them back-to-back it doesn't matter much in which order
    you do them.

    -S-

    > Thanks in advance, Urban
     
  3. How would you know? By your own admission you do not participate in triaflons. You play with
    cow balls.

    Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Urban Bettag wrote:
    > >
    > > I have done three triathlons last year and plan to do some more in the summer. Many years ago I
    > > used to be a competitive cyclist and mainly used a sat-back road racing position. Also I did
    > > quite a lot of running this year. At T2 I always had problems getting up the pace and ended up
    > > with a very poor run. Hence, I was wondering if the saddle position has any effect on the
    > > running. Are there any recommendations on the saddle set-back? Do you use different saddle
    > > positions for different distances (sprint vs. long distance)?
    >
    > Runners and triathletes generally prefer a more forward saddle position than cyclists. This is
    > because the further forward you go, the more emphasis is placed on the backs of the legs and less
    > on the quadriceps at the front. Since runners tend to have better developed hamstrings, they want
    > to be able to make use of them on the bike, hence the more forward position. It also lends itself
    > to better aerodynamics.
    >
    > > Further, when you train, do you mainly bike after a run, or do you run after the bike and if so
    > > for how long?
    >
    > If you're practicing for a triathlon, it makes sense to train your run directly after your bike on
    > a regular basis, if you're not doing them back-to-back it doesn't matter much in which order you
    > do them.
    >
    > -S-
    >
    > > Thanks in advance, Urban
     
  4. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On Fri, 9 May 2003 00:13:13 +0100, "Urban Bettag" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have done three triathlons last year and plan to do some more in the summer. Many years ago I
    >used to be a competitive cyclist and mainly used a sat-back road racing position. Also I did quite
    >a lot of running this year. At T2 I always had problems getting up the pace and ended up with a
    >very poor run. Hence, I was wondering if the saddle position has any effect on the running. Are
    >there any recommendations on the saddle set-back? Do you use different saddle positions for
    >different distances (sprint vs. long distance)? Further, when you train, do you mainly bike after a
    >run, or do you run after the bike and if so for how long?
    >
    >Thanks in advance, Urban
    >
    >
    Definately practice your run off of your bike. In my experiance I find that once I get past
    that "Oh my god what happened to my legs" feeling my running legs are fairly fresh. In some
    case I run better after a ride than starting off fresh without a warmup. I think, especially
    if doing sprint distance, getting used to that dead legg feeling and learning to run thru it
    is imperative.

    ~Matt
     
  5. Bricks are a must. Good advice. Friedes just doesn't know his game because he keeps playing with
    cow bells.

    MJuric wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Fri, 9 May 2003 00:13:13 +0100, "Urban Bettag" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I have done three triathlons last year and plan to do some more in the summer. Many years ago I
    > >used to be a competitive cyclist and mainly used a sat-back road racing position. Also I did
    > >quite a lot of running this year. At T2 I always had problems getting up the pace and ended up
    > >with a very poor run. Hence, I was wondering if the saddle position has any effect on the
    > >running. Are there any recommendations on the saddle set-back? Do you use different saddle
    > >positions for different distances (sprint vs. long distance)? Further, when you train, do you
    > >mainly bike after a run, or do you run after the bike and if so for how long?
    > >
    > >Thanks in advance, Urban
    > >
    > >
    > Definately practice your run off of your bike. In my experiance I find that once I get past
    > that "Oh my god what happened to my legs" feeling my running legs are fairly fresh. In some
    > case I run better after a ride than starting off fresh without a warmup. I think, especially
    > if doing sprint distance, getting used to that dead legg feeling and learning to run thru it
    > is imperative.
    >
    > ~Matt
     
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