Bike Tools

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bobi, Mar 30, 2003.

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  1. Bobi

    Bobi Guest

    I'm thinking of buying some bike tools so I can do some of my own maintenance work and maybe build a
    frame up at some time. I like maintaining my cars, so I thought working on my bike would give me a
    chance to learn more about the thing.

    Here's the question. I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools for home bike maintenance.
    Spin Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park tools, but the price. Are Spin Doc any good?
     
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  2. BobI wrote:
    > I'm thinking of buying some bike tools so I can do some of my own maintenance work and maybe build
    > a frame up at some time. I like maintaining my cars, so I thought working on my bike would give me
    > a chance to learn more about the thing.
    >
    > Here's the question. I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools for home bike
    > maintenance. Spin Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park tools, but the price. Are Spin Doc
    > any good?
    >
    >

    Can't comment on Spin Doctor, but Lifu also make a complete one-price set, and their individual
    tools are nice.
     
  3. r. ingersoll-<< I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools for home bike maintenance. Spin
    Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park tools, but the price.

    Pedros has a tremendous suitcased tool kit that is about as good as it gets. Much Superior to
    Park, IMO-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > r. ingersoll-<< I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools for home bike maintenance.
    > Spin Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park
    tools,
    > but the price.
    >
    > Pedros has a tremendous suitcased tool kit that is about as good as it
    gets.
    > Much Superior to Park, IMO-
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"

    Whatever tools you buy, buy the very best that you can afford. And if you can't afford the best,
    wait 'till you can. There is nothing worse than gizzing up something on your bike because a cheap
    tool let you down. Busted knuckles can heal, but that big gouge on your crankarm won't.
     
  5. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    dave hanson!! the problem defines itself after "doing your own work" that is when the mech. diy
    knows what the bike needs(after the diy mech has screwed it up in his very own idiosyncratic style
    and that's more knowing than having the LBS screw it up in their style whcih will probably be a
    mystery) doing your own work results in your own private and in-depth paranoia about WHATS AGONNA
    HAPPEN ON THE ROAD based on what disasters experienced going ondown to the superduper. my kit ways
    in a something like 14 lbs leaving only a giant channelock out(on second thought...) reason being i
    can maybe trade goodwill for a tool loan- rearing the weight gods ugly heads-yeah but are you
    carrying beans?? once beans are carried then the 14 pound problem recedes somewhat. the
    distance-remotness idea-ace! walking ten miles in the hot sun pushing a bike is uncool
     
  6. Steve

    Steve Guest

    I bought the cheap $50 Nasbar tool kit, and replaced the tools that didn't get the job done with
    better ones. I needed to get a better BB lockring spanner and a freewheel tool, but the rest work
    ok. I've used the cone wrenches, the headset wrenches, the pedal wrench + crank removers, and BB
    tool with out any problems.

    Steve.

    BobI wrote:
    > I'm thinking of buying some bike tools so I can do some of my own maintenance work and maybe build
    > a frame up at some time. I like maintaining my cars, so I thought working on my bike would give me
    > a chance to learn more about the thing.
    >
    > Here's the question. I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools for home bike
    > maintenance. Spin Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park tools, but the price. Are Spin Doc
    > any good?
     
  7. "g.daniels" <[email protected].com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > dave hanson!! the problem defines itself after "doing your own work" that is when the mech. diy
    > knows what the bike needs(after the diy mech has screwed it up in his very own idiosyncratic style
    > and that's more knowing than having the LBS screw it up in their style whcih will probably be a
    > mystery) doing your own work results in your own private and in-depth paranoia about WHATS AGONNA
    > HAPPEN ON THE ROAD based on what disasters experienced going ondown to the superduper. my kit ways
    > in a something like 14 lbs leaving only a giant channelock out(on second thought...) reason being
    > i can maybe trade goodwill for a tool loan- rearing the weight gods ugly heads-yeah but are you
    > carrying beans?? once beans are carried then the 14 pound problem recedes somewhat. the
    > distance-remotness idea-ace! walking ten miles in the hot sun pushing a bike is uncool

    Anybody know what the hell this guy is raving on about?!?!?
     
  8. Kevin

    Kevin Guest

    My Spin Doctor tool box, $89 to $99 depending on the week, is great. It is not like Park and is far
    less. I'm an advanced user and home mechanic.

    I like Peter's recommendation for the Pedro's suitcase toolkit. I need something more and a
    second toolbox.

    "BobI" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Here's the question. I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools
    for
    > home bike maintenance. Spin Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park
    tools,
    > but the price. Are Spin Doc any good?
     
  9. Dave Thompson wrote:

    > "g.daniels" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> dave hanson!! the problem defines itself after "doing your own work" that is when the mech. diy
    >> knows what the bike needs(after the diy mech has screwed it up in his very own idiosyncratic
    >> style and that's more knowing than having the LBS screw it up in their style whcih will probably
    >> be a mystery) doing your own work results in your own private and in-depth paranoia about WHATS
    >> AGONNA HAPPEN ON THE ROAD based on what disasters experienced going ondown to the superduper. my
    >> kit ways in a something like 14 lbs leaving only a giant channelock out(on second thought...)
    >> reason being i can maybe trade goodwill for a tool loan- rearing the weight gods ugly heads-yeah
    >> but are you carrying beans?? once beans are carried then the 14 pound problem recedes somewhat.
    >> the distance-remotness idea-ace! walking ten miles in the hot sun pushing a bike is uncool
    >
    > Anybody know what the hell this guy is raving on about?!?!?

    Well, he might, but I wouldn't stake any money on it.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    Money is a powerful aphrodisiac. But flowers work almost as well. -- Lazarus Long
     
  10. Tsheer

    Tsheer Guest

    "BobI" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm thinking of buying some bike tools so I can do some of my own maintenance work and maybe build
    > a frame up at some time. I like
    maintaining
    > my cars, so I thought working on my bike would give me a chance to learn more about the thing.
    >
    > Here's the question. I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools
    for
    > home bike maintenance. Spin Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park
    tools,
    > but the price. Are Spin Doc any good?
    >
    I'd recommend buying tools separately, rather than in a kit. Chances are you already have allen
    wrenches, right? There are different kinds of bottom bracket tools, and if the one in the kit
    doesn't match your BB, then it's not of much use. 2003 XTR doesn't even use one. A set of cone
    wrenches won't help you if your hubs don't require them.

    So while you can save some money buying a kit, if there are tools in there that you already own or
    won't need, you'll ultimately spend less money by buying just what you need.
     
  11. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Mon, 31 Mar 2003 06:47:53 GMT, "BobI" <[email protected]>
    >
    >Here's the question. I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools for home bike maintenance.
    >Spin Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park tools, but the price. Are Spin Doc any good?
    >

    You don't need many special tools to build up a bicycle. You will need a cassette and bb tool. Any
    brand seems to work ok for amateur use. I happen to like the Lifu cassette tool because it chucks
    into my vise easilly and I think both my Shimano and Campy bb tools are Park.

    Spoke wrench, Spokey is far better than the DT tool.

    I like ball end Hex wrenches and Elkind work fine. 3,4,5,6, 8, 10. Spend money on these wrenches,
    particularly the 5.

    I have not had good luck with the Park cone wrenches, 13,15, (16 & 17 maybe). The Pedro's wrenches
    are stunning.

    A set of diagonal cutters. My Shimano housing cutter worked fine but I bought myself a Felco C7 to
    hand down to future generations.

    If you don't have a threaded headset, that's about all that you'll need and I'm sure you'll have
    some of it already. If you have a threaded headset, you will need at least one 32 mm headset wrench
    and a wide adjustable wrench. If not, a 2nd 32 mm wrench.

    A set of calipers is nice and you can find some on Ebay for about $40 that have one more significant
    digit and are seem made better than the General that you'll find most widely distributed and cost
    double that. I couldn't resist a set of plastic calipers at the 99¢ store for
    2/99¢. I can tell the difference between a 2.0 and 1.5 mm spoke with them and they are accurate
    enough for most routine bicycle stuff.
     
  12. Bobi

    Bobi Guest

    Great advise guys, thanks.

    Here's my take. Your right I have a lot of the less specialized tools already. I was lucky my dad
    started me off well some years ago with Snap-on tools. They have never failed. They only disappear.
    I wish they made bike tools.

    I'll start buying the "good" stuff as I need them and shop Harbor Freight for the stuff that doesn't
    matter, although they do carry some of the better stuff too.

    Thanks for the real specific recommendations Paul. I'm gonna start on your list soon, but I've never
    heard of Lifu or Felco tools.

    I can only drool over the Pedro's Master tool Kit at this point. The wife says she wants to get the
    Visa balance down.

    Thank again, BI
     
  13. Gary Young

    Gary Young Guest

    Brian Huntley <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > BobI wrote:
    > > I'm thinking of buying some bike tools so I can do some of my own maintenance work and maybe
    > > build a frame up at some time. I like maintaining my cars, so I thought working on my bike would
    > > give me a chance to learn more about the thing.
    > >
    > > Here's the question. I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools for home bike
    > > maintenance. Spin Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park tools, but the price. Are Spin Doc
    > > any good?
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Can't comment on Spin Doctor, but Lifu also make a complete one-price set, and their individual
    > tools are nice.

    A lot of the Spin Doctor tools are just rebranded Lifu, I believe. For instance, my Spin Doctor
    chain tool has plastic caps that have the Lifu logo. The chain tool, Spin Doctor cone wrenches, and
    lockring tool I have work fine. I think Supergo sells the same tools under the Aerion name.
     
  14. Ajames54™

    Ajames54™ Guest

    On Mon, 31 Mar 2003 23:01:35 GMT, "Dave Thompson" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"g.daniels" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> dave hanson!! the problem defines itself after "doing your own work" that is when the mech. diy
    >> knows what the bike needs(after the diy mech has screwed it up in his very own idiosyncratic
    >> style and that's more knowing than having the LBS screw it up in their style whcih will probably
    >> be a mystery) doing your own work results in your own private and in-depth paranoia about WHATS
    >> AGONNA HAPPEN ON THE ROAD based on what disasters experienced going ondown to the superduper. my
    >> kit ways in a something like 14 lbs leaving only a giant channelock out(on second thought...)
    >> reason being i can maybe trade goodwill for a tool loan- rearing the weight gods ugly heads-yeah
    >> but are you carrying beans?? once beans are carried then the 14 pound problem recedes somewhat.
    >> the distance-remotness idea-ace! walking ten miles in the hot sun pushing a bike is uncool
    >
    >Anybody know what the hell this guy is raving on about?!?!?
    >
    I'm glad someone asked...
     
  15. Ajames54™

    Ajames54™ Guest

    On Tue, 01 Apr 2003 05:16:13 GMT, "BobI"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Great advise guys, thanks.
    >
    >Here's my take. Your right I have a lot of the less specialized tools already. I was lucky my dad
    >started me off well some years ago with Snap-on tools. They have never failed. They only disappear.
    >I wish they made bike tools.
    >
    >I'll start buying the "good" stuff as I need them and shop Harbor Freight for the stuff that
    >doesn't matter, although they do carry some of the better stuff too.
    >
    >Thanks for the real specific recommendations Paul. I'm gonna start on your list soon, but I've
    >never heard of Lifu or Felco tools.
    >
    >I can only drool over the Pedro's Master tool Kit at this point. The wife says she wants to get the
    >Visa balance down.
    >
    >Thank again, BI
    >
    >
    >

    I'll second Pauls list and suggest you add VAR tools if the are still around (the ones I have are
    ancient and still good)

    I took a look at the Pedros master kit.... what a burn!

    even assuming that everything in there is the best quality of it available... you could still part
    that out to park / Lifu / Craftsman and come in much cheaper...

    "Master Kit" no BB taps ... no HS press ... No reamers/champfering tools of any kind .. no cable
    puller ... no thirdhand tool (does anyone need one of those?) .. no chain whips...

    If you are going to drool find one of the old Campi tool kits... in the custom Cherry(?) case...
    they were a work of art.
     
  16. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Park are greatly overpriced for the quality.

    Check out Pedro and/or look for Wrench Force (a Trek house brand but made by Snap-On).

    Spin Doc is a Performance house brand, I believe.

    > Here's the question. I'd like any recommendations on a good set of tools for home bike
    > maintenance. Spin Doctor and Park come to mind. I like Park tools, but the price. Are Spin Doc
    > any good?
     
  17. Nimrod

    Nimrod Guest

    On 31 Mar 2003 12:30:24 -0800, [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote:

    >dave hanson!! the problem defines itself after "doing your own work" that is when the mech. diy
    >knows what the bike needs(after the diy mech has screwed it up in his very own idiosyncratic style
    >and that's more knowing than having the LBS screw it up in their style whcih will probably be a
    >mystery) doing your own work results in your own private and in-depth paranoia about WHATS AGONNA
    >HAPPEN ON THE ROAD based on what disasters experienced going ondown to the superduper. my kit ways
    >in a something like 14 lbs leaving only a giant channelock out(on second thought...) reason being i
    >can maybe trade goodwill for a tool loan- rearing the weight gods ugly heads-yeah but are you
    >carrying beans?? once beans are carried then the 14 pound problem recedes somewhat. the
    >distance-remotness idea-ace! walking ten miles in the hot sun pushing a bike is uncool

    DUDE.... lay off the PRODUCT W! Nimrod Hugentobler
    --
    Recently, almost everything seems to be over rated.

    -----------== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Uncensored Usenet News ==----------
    http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
    -----= Over 100,000 Newsgroups - Unlimited Fast Downloads - 19 Servers =-----
     
  18. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Steve <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > I bought the cheap $50 Nasbar tool kit, and replaced the tools that didn't get the job done with
    > better ones

    Exactly. when i got my nashbar set, it was 45 bucks and a couple for shipping. it is a mix of lifu
    tools, and no-name generic. however, the 45 dollars is well worth it for what you get, and the
    absolute junk (in my set, it was the cone wrenches and adjustable lockring wrench) got replaced. in
    fact- a couple of the lifu tools, like the BB splined tool, work better for me than the park ones
    ive used. (i had the woodshop i run buy a park toolset.. you know, for wood.)

    the nicest tools are the nicest tools. but if you dont have the nicest paycheck, nashbar generic is
    fine, as long as you take up the slack where necessary.

    i also have to say that i bought this toolkit a few years ago, and i know that nashbar has upgraded
    some of it since then. i also know that when i broke a tool, they sent me a new one immediately. (of
    course, if you buy pedro, you wont break tools, but i just dont have the free cash right now)
     
  19. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Tue, 01 Apr 2003 03:31:16 GMT, Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >I have not had good luck with the Park cone wrenches, 13,15, (16 & 17 maybe). The Pedro's wrenches
    >are stunning.
    >

    Many years ago a friend of mine who's been a bike mechanic for decades recommended Kingsbridge cone
    wrenches. I've never regretted buying them.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  20. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    aw you can't read. bimmer! listen, chuck the adj wrench and go for the lightest vise grips then when
    the cable needs held between the teeth... gonna screw up your nuts? don't use on your nuts-hear the
    one about the camel? use different nuts! boy there's an idea! the big question(this refers to size
    of the tool, guys) is the headset wrench for those of us flogging along on a solid front ends over
    rough roads, distinctly a behavioral problem as one person's rough road is paradise to the next
    flogger. hard to find a headset wrench in the boonies? clearly a question of paranoia, doing your
    own work or letting the LBS screw it up. see, it's behavioral. to get from A to B one must use one's
    HEAD! not one's tool.
     
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