Bike trail etiquette w/joggers

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by ghostpedal, Jul 7, 2005.

  1. ghostpedal

    ghostpedal New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0
    I often ride my mtb on a local gravel bike trail that is shared with walkers and joggers. Most everyone I meet seems very nice and has given me no problems. What has happened recently, though, is that on certain Fridays a group of joggers meet at one end of the trail to start a run. They don't run in a whole group, but seem to break into smaller groups or singles. Anyways, the problems I am having has to do with trying to warn them I am coming. On the trail itself, I do the usual "on your left" etc., but sometimes it is either not heard or ignored. I have a very loud and carrying voice, so I have gotten a little exasperated. The worst part is that when they are meeting at the trail start (or end depending on how you look at it) they block the whole thing and stand around talking and waiting for the other members of their group. I have slowed down and made sure I went through their group safely, and have loudly announced my presence by saying "excuse me, coming through", but many of the people seemed annoyed by this. What is the best way to handle this properly? How do I announce myself without seeming rude?
     
    Tags:


  2. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    0
    Get a big ass air horn! No really I think the only way to deal with it is to either ride slow and around them(after doing what you are already doing to announce your presence), or avoid multiuse trails... I decided a long time ago, multi use trails are no good for cycling on, unless you are teaching your kids to ride or something.
     
  3. dgz69er

    dgz69er New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would stop by sometime and mention it to their group. Explain to them that you are following etiquette by announcing yourself to them, and also explain to them that it is rude for them to not move over. You have the same rights to use the trail as they do. It is also proper etiquette to stay on the right side of a trail, so that people can pass you.
     
  4. martin_j001

    martin_j001 New Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Messages:
    364
    Likes Received:
    0
    Run over someone first, ask questions later. :D

    Seriously, if your asking politely doesn't work, and talking to them and politely explaining anything doesn't work, just ride--they'll move.

    Other than that--avoid multi-use paths like the plague--most are dangerous to cyclists.
     
  5. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2004
    Messages:
    2,010
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm with Wilmar on this one. No matter how many times you try to explain trail etiquette to some people they don't get it. We have a beautiful bike path along the lake here that's outright dangerous to bike on after 7:00 am. There are signs all over the place telling people to keep right, but some of the runners and most of the walkers still insist on going two or three across, taking up the entire path, even when there's a bike approaching from the other direction.
     
  6. ghostpedal

    ghostpedal New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0
    The trail I use is really a good one. There are actually some mornings when I don't even see another person, jogger or cyclist. I think I will talk to someone with the group. For the most part they are a friendly group, so it can't hurt. I will also announce myself even louder. If all else fails, I am a 6'4" old hardtail riding bullet, and Newton says Force = Mass X Acceleration so they better watch out! Thanks for the feedback all!
     
  7. martin_j001

    martin_j001 New Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Messages:
    364
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just think of it like bowling.... :D LOL
     
  8. DHinrichs

    DHinrichs New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2004
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    In the Minneapolis/St. Paul area (where I live) there are LOTS of trails around lakes, along parkways, along the river etc... Often there are separate trails for bicyclists and walkers/runners. Often the trails get so busy that foot traffic wanders on to the bicycle path. Many of the trails around the most popular lakes I simply avoid because of far too many close calls (people walking directly in front of me, accross my path of direction, without even looking). But there is one that I ride often because I live very close to it and it is a gateway to several other trails or routes that I like to ride. I have developed a few rules for myself, some that others think are rude. If there is a clear path past a group of people, I often don't say anything. I don't say anything because too often when I have, someone panics and jumps into the clear path forcing me to take drastic measures to avoid hitting someone when in the former case I simply and quietly glide past them without incident. If people are fully blocking a path I first let the natural bike noises warn them of my approach (I stop pedalling so they hear the tumble of the bearings--and also begins decelaration) I announce I'm approaching and I am very specific about saying where I am going to go. Yes, sometimes after I go by I have had walkers/runners complain about my silent passes, but I've found it is often far more safe than calling out and having them jump into what had been a clear path. I figure they can appreciate not being hit and will get over my unannounced pass.
     
  9. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's the spirit!
     
  10. seigneur

    seigneur New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    slight detour but a couple of weeks back a group of ramblers were blocking my way beneath a bridge, i slowed down and said excuse me could i get past? i was met by alsorts of crap about how i shouldn't be riding there etc, etc, thing was they were leaning against a sign that said SUSTRANS ROUTE 5 they were actually on a cycle route and it was them that should'nt have been there think they would accept that though? had to ride at them to get them to move, selfish self centred bleeders
     
  11. eddie_eds

    eddie_eds New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's a tough one. If it's a regular thing, I'd see if I could figure out who's in charge and ask that person's opinion or slow down one day and ask a few of the runners what they think is the best way to warn them that you're coming through and then do that. If they get annoyed after you've consulted them and are using their preferred method of warning then they're just spazzes and probably nothing you do will keep them from being annoyed at you.

    As far as blocking the trail goes, again, I'd ask the leader or a few of them if they wouldn't mind keeping a path clear for the bikers and other non team runners.

    It's all about people being considerate of everyone using the trail. It seems like some of the runners aren't being very considerate.
     
  12. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    708
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have found that the sound of a bell carries for quite some distance, more than my deep voice which doesn't gain much attention. I ring my bell early and often, and it has proven effective for me. I always pass with a low "Thank you" as well.

    I think that all we can do is to make as many friends as we can with those on foot, and just ignore the others and deal with them as safely as we can.

    I also find that choosing trails that aren't circular, but rather linear leads to significant portions of pedestrian free trail. :)

    My ride yesterday on the Lehigh Gorge Trail is where I really noticed this. After about 45 minutes of riding (I ride slow) without seeing pedestrians I started to see them about a mile from the next access point to the trail.
     
  13. milehi_bikelady

    milehi_bikelady New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm new here...but I thought I'd post my two cents about this and how I handle the folks blocking my way in Denver.

    I ride a bike path along the river just about everyday to work, and even though the section I ride is clearly posted as a path for bikes and blades only (walkers on the other side of the water), I find plenty of walkers, people with dogs, families, and occasional bands of homeless folks blocking my way. :( I was getting frustrated that my voice wasn't being heard (and I'm not a fan at yelling at people), so I now have a great old-fashioned bell that kindly warns people that I'm coming. The sound is not offensive or obtrusive, and I use it to say "thanks" when construction workers get out of the way and sometimes I use it to say "hello" to kids who admire my bike. I've used it for cars that don't see me, and they actually stop and let me go through. I have to agree, the sound of the bell carries far better than my voice.:D
     
  14. astroluc

    astroluc New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    0
    they feel as though since they are part of an organized group, they "own" or have "rights" to the path which they are on. I liken it to the Mall Walkers of the world who feel it is their right to enter a mall before business hours so that they may walk... I have nothing constructive to say, as others have already said what I would; so I thought I would rant :D
     
  15. gubaguba

    gubaguba New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2003
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    0
    Recently I have been walking with an older couple I have gotten to know. I can say for myself that I make an effort to get out of the way when I am aware that a cyclist is coming on the path. I find it nice if the cyclist informs me if other cyclist are behind him "three more riders coming". I think it is also good etiquette to thank the walkers that do get out of your way. I live in New Jersey and frankly I am thankful that there are any wooded areas that any or us can be in. I know of no trails that a just for MTB in my area so not sharing in not an option. Sharing is one of the basic skills in life if your having trouble doing it don't blame others for not behaving the way you want. They never will so might as well adjust and enjoy the ride.
     
  16. ghostpedal

    ghostpedal New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0
    I appreciate the help, and really think I am going to get a bell. I'll see how that goes. I don't mind sharing the path, in fact, I welcome it. I just don't want anyone to get hurt.
     
  17. Meeba

    Meeba New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  18. gubaguba

    gubaguba New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2003
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a bell on my road bike. Its one of those silly things that gives me constant pleasure. It kills the bike shop everytime they see it the whole extra weight thing I guess. I ring it at everyone I pass and they always seem to smile. I ring it when I see miserable riders punishing themselves to try and go faster to remind them that cycling is about having fun. My three year old nephew was thrilled when his tricycle had the same bell as Uncle Paul's. Oh yeah its good for warning pedestrians, unless of course they are wearing headphones. Best $8 bucks I spent on my bike.
     
Loading...
Loading...