bikes for obese

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by chinatrain99, Nov 2, 2005.

  1. chinatrain99

    chinatrain99 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm opening myself up for this one, but I weigh 400 lbs and want to get a bike. Is there any "off the rack bikes" out there that I can get that won't cost me a fortune? I'm mainly going to be using it on the rode chasing my 7 year old. I'm just looking for something cheap (department store?) that won't colapse on me.
     
    Tags:


  2. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    708
    Likes Received:
    0
    You are bound to get lots of advice here, and I will admit that I have given my share... Some of it MAY have backfired.

    My primary ride so far has been a Giant Sedona DX (2003) that I have over 1900 miles on. I weighed 421 at my peak, but didn't start riding until I was at 365. I suggested that the Sedona would be good to another 400 pounder, and he bought a lower level Sedona (I think the ST), and it had a few issues that the bike store was going to correct... Whether it worked out for him I haven't heard.

    In my experience with my DX, I tightened the front fork to its stiffest setting, and rode it for a long time, I then tightened the suspension seat post to make it act as solid, and I have ridden it a bit more. I have had no significant problems with the bike, and what I did have was corrected by the bike store where I bought it.

    I would suggest avoiding the department store bikes based on the comments I have heard on this and another forum, but any good solid bike shop bike that leans toward mountain bike may be your best low cost option. Avoid rear suspension, and I would suggest avoiding all suspension if you can find a mountain bike without them, but with at least fair quality components.

    My bike cost me about $350, which is considered low end in the bike world, but it is significantly more than the department store bikes.

    Don't pick anything with less than 36 spoke wheels, and be sure to keep your tires inflated properly.

    When you do buy a bike, make sure that you leave yourself braking room. It will take you a little extra distance to stop, especially when riding down hill.

    If the $350 range is too high, I would suggest looking for an old used Schwinn (or similar) in nice shape rather than buying new. I have picked up a 1979 Suburban that I am fixing up to be my new primary rider for the coming year. I have never ridden one at more than 300 pounds, but at bikeforums.net they have a classic and vintage forum, and some of the regular posters there proclaim the virtues of the bullet proof old Schwinn gas pipes...

    I am sure that others will provide you with some good choices in frames etc (for example touring frames are designed to carry extra weight, so may be a good bet), but beyond the confusion, just do it, you will be glad you did.

    Also, try searching here and at other cycling forums, the question is asked more often than you might think.

    A recent issue of bicycling magazine had an article on large riders, and has some interesting information. The article may be online. If you can't find it and are interested, let me know, and I will dig out my copy and drop it in the mail.

    I hope you take the leap and join the world of cycling.
     
  3. cali-largeguy

    cali-largeguy New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2005
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    Being a large man myself you need to becareful. 2 questions that arise though are are you looking for a road bike, or a cruiser. Either way, don't buy a department store bike, it'll just break on you, wasting your money and potentially getting hurt. I am about 285lbs now, when I started riding in July I was at 301, and I ride a Giant OCR 2 alum frame. I have put over 800 miles on the bike with no problems. I have the stock Mavic wheels with a 26cm tire. I did upgrade the seat to a bontrager gel seat. All told I spent about $800 on the bike. It is an '05 model so you can probably get it for alot less now if your local shop has any left in stock.
    Whatever you pick out test ride it first. Ask the shop if you can take it out for a weekend to see how it feels. They might let you if you leave a credit card as a deposit. For more info on large riders check out this site.
    http://bmob-bwob.tripod.com/
    Good luck.
     
  4. Dunleyg

    Dunleyg New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2005
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi, Biking is a great Low Impact way to get a burn calories, get in better shape and feel better. Two options I can think about is 1) get a 3 wheeled cycle, 2) get good quality mountin bike with a extra wide seat, tires with a tread ( rather than Knobbies) and handle bars that allow you to reach them while sitting up straight. I have had friend of my parents your size and have had no problems with a 3-wheeler. Good luck and stay with any program.
     
  5. chinatrain99

    chinatrain99 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I called the local bike shop and they suggested an "Atlas Industrial Bike" made by Sun. I'm trying to find a load limit on the bike before getting too serious about it. By finding that bike it looks like I'm looking for "Industrial" type bikes.
     
  6. vonnieglen

    vonnieglen New Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi,

    First I want to congratulate you on recognizing the benefits of cycling. It is a low impact exercise that has redeamed many a poor soul such as myself with an incurable sweet tooth and penchant for buffet food. After I've burned up a few hundred calories by riding around for an hour or two; I refuse to let myself negate it by eating a box of cookies, or a bunch of candy bars.

    My wife and I are serious tandem cyclists. Being designed for two persons, tandems have similar issues to what you are dealing with. I would echo some of what has been said here. I wouldn't bother spending a lot of money on expensive equipment. It sometimes costs hundreds of dollars to save a couple of punds. I also agree with those who have suggested that you avoid bikes with suspension forks and rear triangles. I have seen seats with heavy duty springs that might be helpful however. I would stick with 26 x 2.25" tires and if you get a mountain bike replace the knobbys with some smooth riding "cruiser" tires. If you start breaking spokes you might have some wheels built at your local bike shop using tandem parts.

    If you can't find something locally. I know that Worksman Industrial Bicycles have a very good reputation. They have been around for a long time, are reasonably priced and they sell mail order.

    http://www.worksmancycles.com/

    Sincerely,
    Steve






     
  7. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    3,522
    Likes Received:
    3
    I would like to add a comment as I lost over 75kg. My hospital diet therapy dept would not let me on a bike on the road until I had reached my target weigth zone (25bmi). All my cycling for almost 2 years was indoors.

    Your situation is different, I suggest if riding for more than just a few minutes, wear a heart rate monitor and learn how to pedal (higher cadences), this will protect the good work you are doing and not over do it. A doctor or exercise physiologist can set the correct target zones, be very careful here.

    My bikes have lots of gears and close ratios to keep the heart rate in a very tight zone. I still suffer from fatigue if I go above 65% max HR for more than a minute or so.
     
Loading...
Loading...