Bikes on French trains

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Lionel Scales, Jun 13, 2003.

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  1. Hoping to take a train from Ashford to Grenoble avec bicycle to see the L'Alpe D'Huez stage of this
    year's TDF. Please does anyone have first-hand experience of bikes on French trains which they would
    be willing to share? ... or know of any links to sites with good info? Cheers.
     
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  2. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "Lionel Scales" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hoping to take a train from Ashford to Grenoble avec bicycle to see the L'Alpe D'Huez stage of
    > this year's TDF. Please does anyone have first-hand experience of bikes on French trains which
    > they would be willing to share? ... or know of any links to sites
    with
    > good info? Cheers.

    www.voyages-sncf.com , the French national railway site has an English language section (if needed)
    and full information on bicycle policies. In order to travel on TGV trains and most long distance
    trains, the bike must be in a container (rigid or a bag) of specified dimensions. Just about any
    bicycle must be disassembled to meet the size requirements of the box. I made a few journeys with a
    bicycle box that clearly exceeded the prescribed dimensions and got told off once but was never
    actually stopped from bringing the bike on the train. There are trains on which bicycles can travel
    unpacked and assembled in the baggage car, but these are all local trains or international trains
    operated by a railway other than the SNCF.
    --
    mark
     
  3. Howard

    Howard Guest

    I have used French railways a number of times, including the TGV services, whilst carrying a bike in
    a standard bike bag and have had no problems. Assuming you are taking a road bike all you have to do
    is drop out the wheels and perhaps the bars/stem to make quite a compact package. I used a
    lightweight OZZO bag with a couple of bungees around it to secure everything further and make the
    package samller. I did go one year with panniers and stuff and had to drop the rack off as well but
    with forward planning this can be done easily as well. If you don't have a bike bag or don't want to
    carry one (I used mine as a groundsheet for sitting one etc) you could always go the 'strong
    binliers and tape' route, buying new bags for the journey home.

    Have fun!
     
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