Black Bloody Toes

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by IMBudd, Mar 2, 2004.

  1. IMBudd

    IMBudd Guest

    I have been running for a while and took to the great indoors because of the weather. After a 12
    mile run on a Cybex Treadmill, I noticed blood pooled under the nail of two of my toes.

    Being a tough guy, I did what came natural...I drilled a hole in my toe nails and let the blood out.

    My toes are still sore occassionally after a long run on the treadmill. I wear Reebok Premier Road
    shoes and I don't think I am striking the deck very hard (I'm a light 140 lbs.).

    Any ideas what the problem may be?

    Thanks for the help.
     
    Tags:


  2. Drilling holes in your toenails? Yes, I do have an idea what's wrong. Budget cuts have forced the
    closure of several mental institutions across the country, and now the insane roam our streets
    unsupervised. Welcome to the outside, Slingblade. I fear what will happen if you get a blood blister
    on your forehead...
     
  3. IMBudd wrote:

    >I have been running for a while and took to the great indoors because of the weather. After a 12
    >mile run on a Cybex Treadmill, I noticed blood pooled under the nail of two of my toes.
    >
    >My toes are still sore occassionally after a long run on the treadmill. I wear Reebok Premier Road
    >shoes and I don't think I am striking the deck very hard (I'm a light 140 lbs.).
    >
    >Any ideas what the problem may be?
    >
    >

    Maybe the toebox of your shoes is too small, or your socks are too tight.

    Malc
     
  4. "Miss Anne Thrope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Drilling holes in your toenails? Yes, I do have an idea what's wrong. Budget cuts have forced the
    > closure of several mental institutions across the country, and now the insane roam our streets
    > unsupervised. Welcome to the outside, Slingblade. I fear what will happen if you get a blood
    > blister on your forehead...
    >

    Its actually a pretty common way to let blood out from under nails... and usually isn't all that
    painful. Typical procedure is to use a heated needle (to sterilze it AND make it hot) and slowly and
    carefully let it melt through the nail, when its through the blood can ooze out, will reduce the
    ugly black mark on nail, and also reduce "tenderness" if its a large area. How do you treat
    massively black nails? Sure you can let them go and it will eventually heal, but boy is it ugly, and
    larger areas can actually be quite painful and result in damage to the nailbed, thereby loosing the
    nail and waiting for a new one to grow in (frequently ingrown at that!).
     
  5. David

    David Guest

    Buy a new pair of shoes a half size bigger

    --
    Nova Scotia, Canada
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, IMBudd wrote:
    > I have been running for a while and took to the great indoors because of the weather. After a 12
    > mile run on a Cybex Treadmill, I noticed blood pooled under the nail of two of my toes.
    >
    > Being a tough guy, I did what came natural...I drilled a hole in my toe nails and let the
    > blood out.
    >
    > My toes are still sore occassionally after a long run on the treadmill. I wear Reebok Premier Road
    > shoes and I don't think I am striking the deck very hard (I'm a light 140 lbs.).
    >
    > Any ideas what the problem may be?

    Could be that the uppers of your shoes are rubbing against the toes or something. Getting new shoes
    would be one way to address it, but a more economical way may be to change the lacing so your toes
    have more space.

    Which toes are giving you trouble ?

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  7. Colm

    Colm Guest

  8. Thats a given... but what do you do to heal the already incured injury?

    "David" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Buy a new pair of shoes a half size bigger
    >
    > --
    > Nova Scotia, Canada
     
  9. SwStudio

    SwStudio Guest

    "Colm" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > That's interesting. Which way gives the most space?
    >
    > --
    > Colm

    There's several different ones - A common, very easy one is to cut the lace in half and only use the
    top half of the eyelets, or so. Another one is not as severe - skip the bottem set of eyelets and
    that's it. These's also a few sites online with more elaborate styles that are supposed to help
    different problems.

    A friend of mine literally cuts the entire toebox right off the shoe. You'd think the shoe would
    lose enough of it's integrity to satart flopping around, but he's fine. It would be cold in Winter,
    though, haha (he's a Winter treadmill-only runner).

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org "The most insecure people are the ones you see, putting
    other people down constantly."
     
  10. Bob Burns

    Bob Burns Guest

    IMBudd wrote:
    > I have been running for a while and took to the great indoors because of the weather. After a 12
    > mile run on a Cybex Treadmill, I noticed blood pooled under the nail of two of my toes.
    >
    > Being a tough guy, I did what came natural...I drilled a hole in my toe nails and let the
    > blood out.
    >
    > My toes are still sore occassionally after a long run on the treadmill. I wear Reebok Premier Road
    > shoes and I don't think I am striking the deck very hard (I'm a light 140 lbs.).
    >
    > Any ideas what the problem may be?
    >
    > Thanks for the help.

    Problem is your toes are hitting the front of your shoes. if this only happens on the treadmill, it
    may be caused by your running pace- maybe the 'mill going too fast? if it happens on the roads too,
    then you need bigger shoes.

    I try to keep two pairs and alternate to give my feet a rest. You might try that, but get a
    different shoe than the ones you're running in.

    --
    Bob Burns Mill Hall PA [email protected]
     
  11. Colm

    Colm Guest

    Sounds sensible to me. I've a pair of trail shoes which are a little bit tight and might benefit
    from this. I'll try it out tomorrow. Thanks!

    --
    Colm

    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > There's several different ones - A common, very easy one is to cut the lace in half and only use
    > the top half of the eyelets, or so. Another one is not as severe - skip the bottem set of eyelets
    > and that's it. These's also a few sites online with more elaborate styles that are supposed to
    > help different problems.
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, Colm wrote:
    > That's interesting. Which way gives the most space?
    >

    There are different ways to do this. I've seen this one recommended.

    http://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/shoeshoplacing.htm

    What it does is that it pulls the upper away from the toe at the point were the diagonal lace meets
    the eyelet. So if the big toe or the one next to it are the problem, you want the diagonal lace to
    be over the big toe.

    David already posted good suggestions that generally improve roominess in the toebox.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  13. Rick++

    Rick++ Guest

    > Any ideas what the problem may be?

    Shoes are too small. Your feet can change size a little bit at different times of the day, during
    exercise, and at altitude. Your shoes can shrink a little bit after getting wet.

    Many runners notice a 1/2 to 1 US unit increase in foot size the first year of running. Maybe due to
    more muscle or suppleness.
     
  14. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

  15. IMBudd

    IMBudd Guest

    Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, IMBudd wrote:
    > > I have been running for a while and took to the great indoors because of the weather. After a 12
    > > mile run on a Cybex Treadmill, I noticed blood pooled under the nail of two of my toes.
    > >
    > > Being a tough guy, I did what came natural...I drilled a hole in my toe nails and let the
    > > blood out.
    > >
    > > My toes are still sore occassionally after a long run on the treadmill. I wear Reebok Premier
    > > Road shoes and I don't think I am striking the deck very hard (I'm a light 140 lbs.).
    > >
    > > Any ideas what the problem may be?
    >
    > Could be that the uppers of your shoes are rubbing against the toes or something. Getting new
    > shoes would be one way to address it, but a more economical way may be to change the lacing so
    > your toes have more space.
    >
    > Which toes are giving you trouble ?
    >
    > Cheers,

    The toes next to the big toe...the index toe? Those feel it the worst. Thanks for the great
    suggestion on lacing. I'm going to give it a try!
     
  16. SwStudio

    SwStudio Guest

    "rick++" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > Any ideas what the problem may be?
    >
    > Shoes are too small. Your feet can change size a little bit at different times of the day, during
    > exercise, and at altitude. Your shoes can shrink a little bit after getting wet.
    >
    > Many runners notice a 1/2 to 1 US unit increase in foot size the first year of running. Maybe due
    > to more muscle or suppleness

    It happened to me as well, but I was always under the impression it was due to the arches
    dropping a bit.

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org "The most insecure people are the ones you see, putting
    other people down constantly."

    .
     
  17. Hi,

    > Any ideas what the problem may be?

    I definitely agree to the basic statement made by the others in this thread: Your shoes might be
    too small.

    Infact, your feet will expand during long runs. You can try and compare the length of your feet
    before and after a marathon. The difference is amazing!

    Since my feet are quite long in "normal" circumstances, I'm always running into problems to find the
    correct size in sport shops.

    Good luck,

    Andre
     
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