Black clouds don't faze no one.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Mason, Mar 14, 2004.

  1. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    What is it with colleagues who take great delight in
    spotting a dark cloud when it's knocking off time? The other
    afternoon at 1500 I'd got all togged up to ride the 12 miles
    home when my senior line manager saw a black cloud in the
    south western sky and took great glee in telling me that I
    was going to get wet on the way home. I chuckled and told
    him that I'd seen off December, January and February, so I'm
    not likely to be scared of a black cloud in March, am I?

    Indeed, as I went north out of our works and prepared to
    turn 90 degrees into the westerly wind for the rest of the
    ride, I looked up at the slate grey sky in front of me with
    contempt and laughed at it
    :)

    Simon Mason
    Hull
     
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  2. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What is it with colleagues who take great delight in
    > spotting a dark cloud when it's knocking off time? The
    > other afternoon at 1500 I'd got all togged up to ride the
    > 12 miles home when my senior line manager saw a black
    > cloud in the south western sky and took great glee in
    > telling me that I was going to get wet on the way home. I
    > chuckled and told him that I'd seen off December, January
    > and February, so I'm not likely to be scared of a black
    > cloud in March, am I?
    >
    > Indeed, as I went north out of our works and prepared to
    > turn 90 degrees into the westerly wind for the rest of the
    > ride, I looked up at the slate grey sky in front of me
    > with contempt and laughed at it
    > :)
    >
    > Simon Mason
    > Hull

    The usual reaction at my place of work is a strange look and
    a cry of "you must be mad", when I cycle in in all weather,
    especially the winter.

    Graham
     
  3. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What is it with colleagues who take great delight in
    > spotting a dark cloud when it's knocking off time?

    Dunno but I've just come back from a wet ride and not only
    am I still alive but am in better nick than younger
    colleagues who think the "Rest Of The World" is contained in
    the goggle box in their living room.
    --
    Regards, Pete
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Guest

    "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What is it with colleagues who take great delight in
    > spotting a dark cloud when it's knocking off time?

    Another thing that amuses me is colleguaes reactions to
    winter cycling they treat it some kind of mad crazy thing to
    do whearas for me its the a perfectly normal thing , they
    dont realise what they are missing cycling 9 miles at 04.30
    am on a cold frosty Scottish winter morning.

    Ross
     
  5. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 14:31:25 -0000, "Ross" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Another thing that amuses me is colleguaes reactions to
    >winter cycling they treat it some kind of mad crazy thing
    >to do whearas for me its the a perfectly normal thing ,
    >they dont realise what they are missing cycling 9 miles at
    >04.30 am on a cold frosty Scottish winter morning.

    Of course 50 and 60 years ago it was a perfectly
    normal thing.

    --
    Dave...

    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. -
    Mark Twain
     
  6. "Ross" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > What is it with colleagues who take great delight in
    > > spotting a dark cloud when it's knocking off time?
    >
    > Another thing that amuses me is colleguaes reactions to
    > winter cycling
    they
    > treat it some kind of mad crazy thing to do whearas for me
    > its the a perfectly normal thing , they dont realise what
    > they are missing cycling
    9
    > miles at 04.30 am on a cold frosty Scottish winter
    > morning.
    >

    Ah, so you mean they are doing it and missing things like..
    sleep.. warmth.. breakfast... So true ;)

    Rich
     
  7. Ross

    Ross Guest

    "Richard Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Ross" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > berlin.de...
    > >
    > > "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > What is it with colleagues who take great delight in
    > > > spotting a dark cloud when it's knocking off time?
    > >
    > > Another thing that amuses me is colleguaes reactions to
    > > winter cycling
    > they
    > > treat it some kind of mad crazy thing to do whearas for
    > > me its the a perfectly normal thing , they dont realise
    > > what they are missing
    cycling
    > 9
    > > miles at 04.30 am on a cold frosty Scottish winter
    > > morning.
    > >
    >
    > Ah, so you mean they are doing it and missing things
    > like.. sleep.. warmth.. breakfast... So true ;)
    >
    > Rich

    Sleep ,warmth and breakfast are for big girls blouses :)

    Ross
     
  8. Sky Fly

    Sky Fly Guest

    "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What is it with colleagues who take great delight in
    > spotting a dark cloud when it's knocking off time? The
    > other afternoon at 1500 I'd got all togged up to ride the
    > 12 miles home when my senior line manager saw a black
    > cloud in the south western sky and took great glee in
    > telling me that I was going to get wet on the way home. I
    > chuckled and told him that I'd seen off December, January
    > and February, so I'm not likely to be scared of a black
    > cloud in March, am I?
    >
    > Indeed, as I went north out of our works and prepared to
    > turn 90 degrees into the westerly wind for the rest of the
    > ride, I looked up at the slate grey sky in front of me
    > with contempt and laughed at it
    > :)

    You tell them, Simon. I just got back from a seven mile
    ride, half of which was done against 15mph rainy headwinds.
    Very edifying for the soul, and most upbuilding for one's
    mental and physical discipline.

    To your manager, I can only say "Forgive him, for he knows
    not what he is missing".
    --
    Akin

    aknak at aksoto dot idps dot co dot uk
     
  9. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    > I'm not likely to be scared of a black cloud in
    > March, am I?

    Like my dad used to say: skin is not water-soluble.

    Simon
     
  10. "Ross" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Another thing that amuses me is colleguaes reactions to
    > winter cycling
    they
    > treat it some kind of mad crazy thing to do whearas for me
    > its the a perfectly normal thing , they dont realise what
    > they are missing cycling
    9
    > miles at 04.30 am on a cold frosty Scottish winter
    > morning.

    At least you don't need to waste 10 minutes scraping the ice
    of a bike on a frosty morning.

    Each cold frosty morning I hear that scraping sound starting
    at 6am onwards (although I'm usually asleep at that time).
     
  11. On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 21:49:45 -0000, in
    <[email protected]>, "Adrian Boliston"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Ross" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >berlin.de...
    >
    >> Another thing that amuses me is colleguaes reactions to
    >> winter cycling
    >they
    >> treat it some kind of mad crazy thing to do whearas for
    >> me its the a perfectly normal thing , they dont realise
    >> what they are missing cycling
    >9
    >> miles at 04.30 am on a cold frosty Scottish winter
    >> morning.
    >
    >At least you don't need to waste 10 minutes scraping the
    >ice of a bike on a frosty morning.

    Sometimes my gear cables freeze up, which is a bit of a
    bugger if you left your bike in the big sprocket.
    --
    DISCLAIMER: My email box is private property.Email which
    appears in my inbox is mine to do what I like with. Anything
    which is sent to me (whether intended or not) may, if I so
    desire, form a legal and binding contract.
     
  12. Martian

    Martian Guest

    "Simonb" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I'm not likely to be scared of a black cloud in
    > > March, am I?
    >
    > Like my dad used to say: skin is not water-soluble.
    >
    > Simon

    I often point out to people that rain is actually only water
    and not battery acid (well not quite!).

    M
     
  13. McBain_v1

    McBain_v1 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Messages:
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    First off, congrats on living in Hull and riding a bike. I read that Hull is the fattest place in Britain at the moment. Perhaps you ought to remind your bosses of this fact the next time they quail at the thought of (a) cycling and (b) getting wet whilst doing so.

    Second, cycling in inclement weather is excellent! I think that cycling during the "winter months" is brilliant and have a bike set up for just that. I reckon there are plenty of fair-weather weenies who would rather bloat in bed than bash out some miles when it's windy, cold and raining.

    Third, as my dad always says, coming home near freezing with no sensation in your feet, backside and hands is "character building" :D
     
  14. I am mighty glad, however, that it's ten degrees warmer than
    last week. What is it about my Carnac shoes that makes my
    feet freeze?

    --

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  15. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "McBain_v1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:vgg5c.65238
    > First off, congrats on living in Hull and riding a bike. I
    > read that Hull is the fattest place in Britain at the
    > moment. Perhaps you ought to remind your bosses of this
    > fact the next time they quail at the thought of (a)
    > cycling and (b) getting wet whilst doing so.

    It's also the third cycling city after Cambridge and
    Oxford. The obesity thing is questionable anyway. The data
    used were Type 2 diabetes occurrences which are not always
    related to obesity. The main problem with Hull is that
    it's had a long tradition of eating fish and chips, which
    isn't too bad if you've a manual job and bike to work.
    It's when you keep eating the fatty foods but now no
    longer go to sea hauling nets for 3 weeks, but sit at a
    desk all day and slob in front of the telly watching East
    Enders every night.

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W
    http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
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