Blanching

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ken Knecht, Apr 4, 2006.

  1. Ken Knecht

    Ken Knecht Guest

    Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I looked
    up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to blasnch
    the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't bother
    to? Anyone know?

    TIA


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  2. jay

    jay Guest

    On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 17:56:55 +0000, Ken Knecht wrote:

    > Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I looked
    > up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to blasnch
    > the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    > freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't bother
    > to? Anyone know?
    >
    > TIA


    Do you know about google?
    www.google.com

    blanching why .. and this is the first hit along with a jillion others.

    http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/kovach59.html

    Hope this helps you.
     
  3. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Ken Knecht wrote:

    > Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I looked
    > up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to blasnch
    > the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    > freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't bother
    > to? Anyone know?
    >


    According a message in a recent thread about enzymes, it destroys the
    enzymes which speed up rotting.
     
  4. Vanguard

    Vanguard Guest

    "Ken Knecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I
    > looked
    > up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to
    > blasnch
    > the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    > freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't
    > bother
    > to? Anyone know?




    "Frozen vegetables will become tough and lose flavor during storage
    unless enzyme activity is stopped by blanching before freezing."
    (http://snipurl.com/oocr)

    "It [blanching] is a very important step in freezing vegetables because
    it slows or stops the action of enzymes. These enzymes are essential for
    growth and maturation of the plant. If the enzyme action is not stopped
    before freezing, the vegetables may develop off-flavors, discolor, or
    toughen so that they may be unappetizing in a few weeks."
    (http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/yf/foods/he187w.htm)

    Googling on "+blanching +freezing" finds many other articles.

    > --
    >
    > A trillion here, a trillion there,
    > pretty soon you're talking real money.


    Please don't misquote or rewrite someone else's quote unless you note
    that you are paraphrasing (and note who you are paraphrasing). "A
    billion here and a billion there, and pretty soon you're talking real
    money." (Everett Dirkson, Illinois senator)

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  5. aem

    aem Guest

    Ken Knecht wrote:
    > Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I looked
    > up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to blasnch
    > the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    > freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't bother
    > to? Anyone know?
    >

    Short answer is, just because. We have found in experimenting with our
    home garden harvest that a number of things don't need the suggested
    blanching. Peppers and tomatoes and snowpeas and zucchini, for
    example. Things we do blanch usually do better with shorter times than
    traditionally suggested, at least for us. Green beans, for example, we
    blanch for 30 seconds, then ice bath, then drain and dry. -aem
     
  6. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Ken Knecht wrote:

    > Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I looked
    > up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to blasnch
    > the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    > freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't bother
    > to? Anyone know?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >

    Ken, blanching stops the enzyme activity in the vegetables allowing for
    longer storage. IMO the colour is better and doesn't degrade during
    freezing if the veggies are blanched. The proper way to blanch is to
    prepare your veggies and bring a pot of water to a boil. While waiting
    for the water to boil run cold water into a clean sink. Add ice cubes.
    Put your veggies into the boiling water for the required amount of
    time. When the timing is up, remove the veggies, strain and immediately
    put into the ice water.

    If you don't blanch, the veggies won't last as long. Only certain
    veggies need to be blanched. Two really good sources for this
    information are the Ball Blue Book and Putting Food By.

    HTH

    --
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    on rfc but worse. She steals pics then tries to sell them as her own.
    Some here condone this behaviour. Shame on you!
     
  7. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Ken Knecht wrote:
    > Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I looked
    > up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to blasnch
    > the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    > freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't bother
    > to? Anyone know?


    As far as I know blanching hasn't a whit to do with enzymes/bacteria,
    freezing is what preserves the vegetable in total and at the same time
    controls any further decay/decomposition. If blanching were a
    necessary process for preservation there'd be no need to then
    subsequently freeze. And then there's parboiling, a more aggressive
    form of blanching, that will stop bacterial.enzymatic action, but then
    there'd be no subsequent freezing... parboiling is typically done prior
    to dehydrating or when food will be refrigerated for an extended period
    before fully cooking.

    blanch
    1. To plunge food (usually vegetables and fruits) into boiling water
    briefly, then into cold water to stop the cooking process. Blanching is
    used to firm the flesh, to loosen skins (as with peaches and tomatoes)
    and to heighten and set color and flavor (as with vegetables before
    freezing).

    © Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
    LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

    Sheldon
     
  8. jay

    jay Guest

  9. Pennyaline

    Pennyaline Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Ken Knecht wrote:
    >> Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I looked
    >> up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to blasnch
    >> the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    >> freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't bother
    >> to? Anyone know?

    >
    > As far as I know blanching hasn't a whit to do with enzymes/bacteria,
    > freezing is what preserves the vegetable in total and at the same time
    > controls any further decay/decomposition. If blanching were a
    > necessary process for preservation there'd be no need to then
    > subsequently freeze.


    Cell metabolism not your thing, Shel? Freezing does not stop enzymatic
    and bacteriologic activity. It slows it way down, but it does not stop
    it. Thus the limited time that food can be stored frozen, because
    decay/decomposition is not controlled or stopped but only slowed.



    > And then there's parboiling, a more aggressive
    > form of blanching, that will stop bacterial.enzymatic action, but then
    > there'd be no subsequent freezing... parboiling is typically done prior
    > to dehydrating or when food will be refrigerated for an extended period
    > before fully cooking.


    Parboiling is parcooking, not blanching. It may be done before
    dehydrating food or before refrigeration, but the cell lysis caused by
    parcooking as well as from handling to prepare and store it
    automatically limits the time the food can be held under refrigeration
    alone. You might as well do nothing. And just as for blanching, it will
    not destroy all bacteria and enzymes. It will only slow them down.



    > blanch
    > 1. To plunge food (usually vegetables and fruits) into boiling water
    > briefly, then into cold water to stop the cooking process. Blanching is
    > used to firm the flesh, to loosen skins (as with peaches and tomatoes)
    > and to heighten and set color and flavor (as with vegetables before
    > freezing).


    Please refer to http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/5333.html, with
    particular attention to this part:
    " Blanch or scald to stop enzyme action, wilt vegetables for easier
    packaging, remove earthy flavors and some undesirable bacteria, further
    clean product, and 'set' color. Blanch in boiling water or steam. Hard
    water may toughen vegetables; if this occurs, use softened water."
     
  10. Pennyaline

    Pennyaline Guest

    jay wrote:
    > On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 17:56:55 +0000, Ken Knecht wrote:
    >
    >> Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen?

    >
    >> TIA

    >
    > This google hit is interesting.
    >
    > http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/vita/515591.html


    Isn't this well-known by now? Nutritionists have always taught us that
    fruits and veggies must be today-fresh and unprocessed when eaten for
    maximum nutritional benefit.
     
  11. aem

    aem Guest

    Pennyaline wrote:
    > [snip]
    > Please refer to http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/5333.html, with
    > particular attention to this part:
    > " Blanch or scald to stop enzyme action, wilt vegetables for easier
    > packaging, remove earthy flavors and some undesirable bacteria, further
    > clean product, and 'set' color. Blanch in boiling water or steam. Hard
    > water may toughen vegetables; if this occurs, use softened water."


    Not addressed, though, is the question of degree. Blanching might
    retard deterioration if you plan to freeze for very long periods of
    time. If you're just going to freeze for a couple of months because
    the home garden harvest is too large to keep up with, the benefit is
    probably not measurable.

    The trouble with blanching is that traditionally recommended times cook
    the vegetables more than is desirable so that when you thaw them they
    are limp and have lost too much flavor. -aem
     
  12. Jude

    Jude Guest

    ~patches~ wrote:

    .. Two really good sources for this
    > information are the Ball Blue Book and Putting Food By.
    >


    Geez, my mind must be in the gutter today. I misread this as the Blue
    Balls Book and figured it was some kinda joke I didn;t get about celery
    and lust.......
     
  13. jay

    jay Guest

    On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 13:57:24 -0600, Pennyaline wrote:

    > jay wrote:
    >> On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 17:56:55 +0000, Ken Knecht wrote:
    >>
    >>> Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen?

    >>
    >>> TIA

    >>
    >> This google hit is interesting.
    >>
    >> http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/vita/515591.html

    >
    > Isn't this well-known by now? Nutritionists have always taught us that
    > fruits and veggies must be today-fresh and unprocessed when eaten for
    > maximum nutritional benefit.


    Indeed..but the percentages surprised me. I use the microwave mostly for
    popcorn with plenty of butter and try to maintain a rather empty freezer.
    Fresh is fairly easy for those of us that live close to Whole Foods or
    Central Market and our friend is a farmer of many fresh crops who
    shares. I personally tend to go on fresh/organic binges but sober up for
    something wonderful and tastey but lousy from a health standpoint.
     
  14. Peter A

    Peter A Guest

    In article <k%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Cell metabolism not your thing, Shel? Freezing does not stop enzymatic
    > and bacteriologic activity. It slows it way down, but it does not stop
    > it. Thus the limited time that food can be stored frozen, because
    > decay/decomposition is not controlled or stopped but only slowed.
    >
    >


    Half right. Enzymatic activity can continue in frozen food, hence the
    blanching, but bacterial activity is stopped completely. Living
    organisms require liquid water to function.

    --
    Peter Aitken
     
  15. Pennyaline

    Pennyaline Guest

    Peter A wrote:
    > In article <k%[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >> Cell metabolism not your thing, Shel? Freezing does not stop enzymatic
    >> and bacteriologic activity. It slows it way down, but it does not stop
    >> it. Thus the limited time that food can be stored frozen, because
    >> decay/decomposition is not controlled or stopped but only slowed.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Half right. Enzymatic activity can continue in frozen food, hence the
    > blanching, but bacterial activity is stopped completely. Living
    > organisms require liquid water to function.


    I refer you to the article I cited for Shel. Freezing does not stop all
    bacterial activity completely, and all forms of bacteria and other
    contamination are not killed by freezing.
     
  16. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Ken Knecht wrote:
    >> Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I looked
    >> up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to blasnch
    >> the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    >> freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't bother
    >> to? Anyone know?

    >
    > As far as I know blanching hasn't a whit to do with enzymes/bacteria,
    > freezing is what preserves the vegetable in total and at the same time
    > controls any further decay/decomposition. If blanching were a
    > necessary process for preservation there'd be no need to then
    > subsequently freeze.


    The operative phrase here is "as far as I know", because as usual you
    *don't* know what you are talking about. ;-)

    Freezing halts bacteria action, which will start up again when you thaw
    the stuff out -- it doesn't kill all the bacteria (it probably kill some
    of them) it just temporarily stops them.

    Blanching destroys enzymes in the vegetables that would otherwise cause
    them to discolor, or change taste and texture. Freezing slows down
    enzymatic activity but does stop it completely.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  17. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    zxcvbob wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    > > Ken Knecht wrote:
    > >> Why is blanching suggested for food to be frozen? For example, I looked
    > >> up celery in a book on freezing stuff I have and it tells me to blasnch
    > >> the celery for three minutes before freezing. Cool off, then bag and
    > >> freeze. What does the blanching do? What would happen if I didn't bother
    > >> to? Anyone know?

    > >
    > > As far as I know blanching hasn't a whit to do with enzymes/bacteria,
    > > freezing is what preserves the vegetable in total and at the same time
    > > controls any further decay/decomposition. If blanching were a
    > > necessary process for preservation there'd be no need to then
    > > subsequently freeze.


    > Freezing slows down [controls] enzymatic activity but does stop it completely.


    Another functionally illiterate ass... where pray tell did I say STOP?
    Join twat face up there.

    Some claim blanching is done prior to freezing to set color and flavor,
    I've never found that to be true, not in even one case and I freeze a
    lot of veggies. Many, many years ago I used to blanch veggies but no
    more... that blanching sets color and flavor prior to freezing is an
    old wive's tale, a total myth. The only thing I've found blanching
    does is help remove vegetable skin, nothing else whatsoever, NOTHING!
    Okay, it's a waste of time.

    Sheldon
     
  18. Peter A

    Peter A Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > > Half right. Enzymatic activity can continue in frozen food, hence the
    > > blanching, but bacterial activity is stopped completely. Living
    > > organisms require liquid water to function.

    >
    > I refer you to the article I cited for Shel. Freezing does not stop all
    > bacterial activity completely, and all forms of bacteria and other
    > contamination are not killed by freezing.
    >
    >


    Then the article is wrong. You are right that freezing does not kill
    bacteria but that was not the original claim. Freezing does stop all
    bacterial action.

    --
    Peter Aitken
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > Then the article is wrong. You are right that freezing does not kill
    > bacteria but that was not the original claim. Freezing does stop all
    > bacterial action.
    >


    you might be surprised:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=
    10943552&dopt=Abstract
    or
    http://tinyurl.com/ko6bf

    Flatmate of mine, 25 years ago, wrote her master's thesis on psychotrophic
    bacteria in milk, so I knew what to google for :)

    However, I think this is not really [practically] relevant outside an
    industrial environment.
    I consider bacterial activity in my frozen food to be slowed by several
    magnitudes rather than stopped. Works for me.

    -Peter

    --
    =========================================
    firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
     
  20. Pennyaline

    Pennyaline Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >> Freezing slows down [controls] enzymatic activity but does stop it completely.

    >
    > Another functionally illiterate ass... where pray tell did I say STOP?
    > Join twat face up there.
    >
    > Some claim blanching is done prior to freezing to set color and flavor,
    > I've never found that to be true, not in even one case and I freeze a
    > lot of veggies. Many, many years ago I used to blanch veggies but no
    > more... that blanching sets color and flavor prior to freezing is an
    > old wive's tale, a total myth. The only thing I've found blanching
    > does is help remove vegetable skin, nothing else whatsoever, NOTHING!
    > Okay, it's a waste of time.


    Okay, Shelly, it's a waste of time. A total waste of time. Okay.
    Continuing this with you is too, as there is no point in trying to
    communicate with anyone who is chronically correct about everything.
     
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