Blind Cyclists

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Slow Pedlar, Aug 28, 2003.

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  1. Slow Pedlar

    Slow Pedlar Guest

    Any blind cyclists read this news group. Just wondered how you coped out on your bike using a GPS
    and an OS map. Do you take the dog with you for a bit of excercise. Wonder what type of bike the dog
    has. God it makes me wonder sometimes.
     
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  2. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Slow Pedlar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Any blind cyclists read this news group. Just wondered how you coped out
    on
    > your bike using a GPS and an OS map.

    The blind cyclists I see are usually on the back of a tandem and rely on the "captain" to navigate
    so have no need of a map or GPS.

    >Do you take the dog with you for a bit of excercise. Wonder what type of bike the dog has.

    The blind cyclists I see do not have their dogs with them, presumably the dogs have adequate
    exercise carrying out their normal duties.

    >God it makes me wonder sometimes.

    Posts like yours make me wonder sometimes. Not wonder at why some people are as witless as you,
    which I've come to accept, but more at why I feel compelled to reply.
     
  3. Slow Pedlar

    Slow Pedlar Guest

    Excellant explanation, I see things better now. Only thing puzzles me is why a captain is out on a
    bike. Maybe things are plain sailing with him along.
     
  4. Simon Proven

    Simon Proven Guest

    Slow Pedlar wrote:

    > Excellant explanation, I see things better now. Only thing puzzles me is why a captain is out on a
    > bike. Maybe things are plain sailing with him along.

    Delusions of grandeur, innit. The other party, the "stoker" has delusions of servility.
     
  5. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Slow Pedlar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Excellant explanation, I see things better now. Only thing puzzles me is
    why
    > a captain is out on a bike. Maybe things are plain sailing with him along.

    Courtesy of: www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary Captain: Pronunciation: 'kap-t&n also 'kap-&m Function:
    noun Etymology: Middle English capitane, from Middle French capitain, from Late Latin capitaneus,
    adjective & n., chief, from Latin capit-, caput head -- more at HEAD Date: 14th century 1 a (1) : a
    military leader : the commander of a unit or a body of troops
    (2) : a subordinate officer commanding under a sovereign or general (3) : a commissioned officer in
    the army, air force, or marine corps ranking above a first lieutenant and below a major b (1) :
    a naval officer who is master or commander of a ship (2) : a commissioned officer in the navy
    ranking above a commander and below a commodore and in the coast guard ranking above a commander
    and below a rear admiral c : a senior pilot who commands the crew of an airplane d : an officer
    in a police department or fire department in charge of a unit (as a precinct or company) and
    usually ranking above a lieutenant and below a chief
    3 : one who leads or supervises: as a : a leader of a sports team or side
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Thu, 28 Aug 2003 20:27:10 GMT, "Slow Pedlar" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Any blind cyclists read this news group. Just wondered how you coped out on your bike using a GPS
    >and an OS map. Do you take the dog with you for a bit of excercise. Wonder what type of bike the
    >dog has. God it makes me wonder sometimes.

    Based on my experience of steering a tandem for a statistically insignificant sample of one blind
    cyclist, the normal arrangement seems to be a tandem with the blind person as stoker. The steersman
    (or pilot or captain) does the navigating. My mate Bob doesn't have a dog (not all blind people do).

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com New!
    Improved!! Now with added extra Demon!
     
  7. robbiew

    robbiew New Member

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    I pilot a blind friend on a regular Tuesday night tandem ride. He takes his folding white stick with him strapped to the carrier. He would love to be able to navigate and to be fair usually knows where abouts he is on the local roads. I am constantly humbled by his positive attitude and determination in all aspects of life.

    Don't take the pi55 out of him. Incidentally we do triathlon together.
     
  8. Bryan

    Bryan New Member

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    I Wonder how you managed to work out how to turn teh computer on and find this news group. Or perhaps someone had to do it all for you as you obviously havn;t go a an ounce of intelligence, or compassion.

    FWIW, my girlfriend contracted an eye infection last year and has subsequently been rendered blind. She would love to come out riding with me, but can't. However she has just submitted her application for the London Marathon, and although she doen't have guide dog (if she get's in) is raising money for Guide dogs for the Blind (For those interested when her donation web site is up and running I'll post it the address here).

    Bryan
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Bryan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > FWIW, my girlfriend contracted an eye infection last year and has subsequently been rendered
    > blind. She would love to come out riding with me, but can't.

    Bad luck. I'd hate that. A tandem would seem an obvious thing to get.

    cheers, clive
     
  10. Pete Whelan

    Pete Whelan Guest

    robbiew wrote:
    > Slow Pedlar wrote:
    > > Any blind cyclists read this news group. Just wondered how you coped out on your bike using a
    > > GPS and an OS map. Do you take the dog with you for a bit of excercise. Wonder what type of
    > > bike the dog has. God it makes me wonder sometimes.
    >
    >
    >
    > I pilot a blind friend on a regular Tuesday night tandem ride. He takes his folding white stick
    > with him strapped to the carrier. He would love to be able to navigate and to be fair usually
    > knows where abouts he is on the local roads. I am constantly humbled by his positive attitude and
    > determination in all aspects of life.
    >
    > Don't take the pi55 out of him. Incidentally we do triathlon together.

    totally agree with you here, Slow Pedlar ought to take a reality check of life.

    I too pilot a tandem for a blind lady, generally a few times a year, especially for the BOLD tandem
    marathon event (we won it this year). She still makes me feel little at what we achieved,
    especially as I know she got herself donw to a local gym and swimming pool virtually every day to
    do some training.

    --
    Pete

    interchange 12 for 21 to reply
     
  11. Sue

    Sue Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Clive George

    >
    >> FWIW, my girlfriend contracted an eye infection last year and has subsequently been rendered
    >> blind. She would love to come out riding with me, but can't.
    >
    >Bad luck. I'd hate that. A tandem would seem an obvious thing to get.
    >
    It's nowhere near as easy as it looks! I had a go at it, but it's like learning to ride a bike all
    over again, and I don't normally use drops which is what the tandem has. It does come with its own
    mechanic, since that's what its blind owner does for a living.

    It seems help is available, as he told some anecdotes of RNIB training courses for new blind tandem
    couples. Training completely new steerers is only for the brave, as they're likely to fall off at
    least once (he stayed on his feet and supported the bike while I rolled onto the verge!)

    --
    Sue ]:(:)
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Sue" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In message <[email protected]>, Clive George

    > >
    > >> FWIW, my girlfriend contracted an eye infection last year and has subsequently been rendered
    > >> blind. She would love to come out riding with me, but can't.
    > >
    > >Bad luck. I'd hate that. A tandem would seem an obvious thing to get.
    > >
    > It's nowhere near as easy as it looks! I had a go at it, but it's like learning to ride a bike all
    > over again, and I don't normally use drops which is what the tandem has. It does come with its own
    > mechanic, since that's what its blind owner does for a living.

    You can get tandems with straight bars...

    > It seems help is available, as he told some anecdotes of RNIB training courses for new blind
    > tandem couples. Training completely new steerers is only for the brave, as they're likely to fall
    > off at least once (he stayed on his feet and supported the bike while I rolled onto the verge!)

    Hmm - the general idea for riding a tandem is that you don't fall off. There's no need for a new
    captain (steerer) to do so - eg I watched one today do just fine. One generally recommended thing is
    to ride solo for a bit to get used to the feel of the bike (brakes, gears, pedals, etc). If the
    captain is smaller than the stoker, things do get a little harder - does this apply to you? But I'm
    guessing the OP doesn't have this situation.

    cheers, clive
     
  13. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sat, 30 Aug 2003 23:14:43 +0100, Sue <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It's nowhere near as easy as it looks! I had a go at it, but it's like learning to ride a bike all
    >over again, and I don't normally use drops which is what the tandem has. It does come with its own
    >mechanic, since that's what its blind owner does for a living.

    Bob Bristow by any chance? Or are there two blind tandem-riding mechanics in Britain?

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com New!
    Improved!! Now with added extra Demon!
     
  14. Sue

    Sue Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >>It's nowhere near as easy as it looks! I had a go at it, but it's like learning to ride a bike all
    >>over again, and I don't normally use drops which is what the tandem has. It does come with its own
    >>mechanic, since that's what its blind owner does for a living.
    >
    >Bob Bristow by any chance? Or are there two blind tandem-riding mechanics in Britain?
    >
    Possibly not, though it's hard to imagine a blind bike mechanic not riding a tandem if he
    possibly could.

    Dealing with Bob's really educational - "There's some play in this, look!" "I can't see anything..."
    "Put your finger on it and feel it then!" "Oh, yeah, there is some play in it!"

    Does that mean you live in R**ding?
    --
    Sue ]:(:)
     
  15. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "Sue" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > >Bob Bristow by any chance? Or are there two blind tandem-riding mechanics in Britain?

    > Dealing with Bob's really educational - "There's some play in this, look!" "I can't see
    > anything..." "Put your finger on it and feel it then!" "Oh, yeah, there is some play in it!"

    Oh yes. I remember riding back with Bob on my solo, he had a new steersman that day. He was giving
    directions as we rode through the centre of town, and the steersman kept asking me to confirm them.
    I ventured the opinion that a blind man was unlikely to give directions unless he was pretty sure
    where he was and where he was going...

    > Does that mean you live in R**ding?

    Indeedy doody. We may even have met, though I haven't been out with the club much this year (other
    things keep comoing up, like meetings on Wednesday evenings).

    I ride either a light blue Claud Butler tourer or a once-yellow-now-blue recumbent.
     
  16. Sue

    Sue Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >Oh yes. I remember riding back with Bob on my solo, he had a new steersman that day. He was giving
    >directions as we rode through the centre of town, and the steersman kept asking me to confirm them.
    >I ventured the opinion that a blind man was unlikely to give directions unless he was pretty sure
    >where he was and where he was going...
    >
    That made me laugh. People who can see have trouble finding their way around Reading!

    --
    Sue ]:(:)
     
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