Blood Lipids and Diet

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Don, Feb 19, 2004.

  1. Don

    Don Guest

    How long after starting a new lifestyle/diet; that is, adding a certain food or foods to one's diet
    does it take for a change to show up in blood lipids?

    I've read that adding olive oil, peanut butter, and nuts (in moderation) to ones diet can be
    beneficial to heart health. However, everyone's metabolism is different. I'd like to try different
    foods to see what effect it has on my blood lipids (especially total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and
    Triglycerides) but I am not sure how long to wait before requesting blood work.

    I've also read that dark chocolate that contains cocoa butter is beneficial.

    In other words, if I were to add those foods to my diet and wait 2 weeks, would the effects show up
    in my blood work, or should I wait a month? Then drop those foods and wait "x" amount of time to
    have blood work done again to see the effects for comparison.

    Hope I have worded this so that you know what I mean. Thanks, Don

    --
    ==============================
    HAPPY NEW YEAR !!

    ==============================
    My web page:
    http://webpages.charter.net/don12345
     
    Tags:


  2. On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 22:44:17 -0500, "Don" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How long after starting a new lifestyle/diet; that is, adding a certain food or foods to one's diet
    >does it take for a change to show up in blood lipids?

    ...............

    Interesting question. And I think I can give an answer - if just a series of one.

    My cholesterol was high enough for my doctor to put me on Lipitor aound six months ago. (I do not
    recall the exact figure.)

    Three months ago (after three months on Lipitor) my lipid profile was as follows (in parenthesis are
    the normal values for Quest Diagnostics, the lab my doctor uses):

    Triglycerides 131 (nl > 150) Total cholesterol 151 (nl < 200) HDL cholesterol 37 (nl > or = 40) LDL
    cholesterol 88 (nl < 130) Chol/HDLC ratio 4.1 (nl < 5.0)

    I stayed on the Lipitor, but three-and-a-half weeks ago started the South Beach Diet. My weight thus
    far has dropped from 233 to 209.

    Still on Lipitor, my doctor rechecked my lipids four days ago. (He also checked my urine -
    no ketones.)

    Here are my values three weeks after a diet change (same laboratory; all values fasting):

    Triglycerides 87 Total cholesterol 109 HDL cholesterol 43 LDL cholesterol 49 Chol/HDLC ratio 2.5

    Now this is far from a scientific study, but in at least one case (mine) a diet change made a huge
    difference very quickly.

    Hope this helps.

    smn
     
  3. Francispoon

    Francispoon Guest

    "Don" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > How long after starting a new lifestyle/diet; that is, adding a certain food or foods to one's
    > diet does it take for a change to show up in blood lipids?

    It did not take that long in my case.

    I had a check up on nov 3, 2003 and my lipid levels are as follows:

    TCH 6.58 LDL-C 4.07 TG 2.36

    Then after eating carefully for a while in accordance with the doctor's advice, plus the help
    from 9 days' herb tea, I managed to bring it down to the following on Dec 31, 2003: TCH 5.27 LDL-
    C 2.94 TG 1.13

    Without further herbs treatment, I continued to eat carefully and lose weight. Then on Feb 17,
    2004... TCH 4.87 LDL-C 2.59 TG 1.32

    As you can see, taking cholesterol-lowering medicine is NOT a lifetime commitment. If you eat
    carefully and make an effort to lose weight, you could achieve more favorable lipid levels. You
    may need to use drug to help you in the process. But once you achieve better levels, you could let
    the drugs go!

    Write to multi-national corporations like Pfizer and ask them if they have any ready-made herb pills
    used for cholesterol-lowering. The good thing about herbs is that they rarely produce side-effects.

    FP
    ===============================================
    >
    > I've read that adding olive oil, peanut butter, and nuts (in moderation) to ones diet can be
    > beneficial to heart health. However, everyone's metabolism is different. I'd like to try different
    > foods to see what effect it has on my blood lipids (especially total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and
    > Triglycerides) but I am not sure how long to wait before requesting blood work.
    >
    > I've also read that dark chocolate that contains cocoa butter is beneficial.
    >
    > In other words, if I were to add those foods to my diet and wait 2 weeks, would the effects show
    > up in my blood work, or should I wait a month? Then drop those foods and wait "x" amount of time
    > to have blood work done again to see the effects for comparison.
    >
    > Hope I have worded this so that you know what I mean. Thanks, Don
     
  4. Adding olive oil, almond butter, and peanut butter have improved my lipids enough so I've been able
    to ditch statin drugs. Also, don't forget to eat fatty fish or fish oil capsules. I eat 3.75 oz of
    herring daily. My ratio tot chol/hdl is now 3.1 - which is good. Before, my tot chol was 250, hdl
    35, trig 190.

    "Don" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > How long after starting a new lifestyle/diet; that is, adding a certain food or foods to one's
    > diet does it take for a change to show up in blood lipids?
    >
    > I've read that adding olive oil, peanut butter, and nuts (in moderation) to ones diet can be
    > beneficial to heart health. However, everyone's metabolism is different. I'd like to try different
    > foods to see what effect it has on my blood lipids (especially total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and
    > Triglycerides) but I am not sure how long to wait before requesting blood work.
    >
    > I've also read that dark chocolate that contains cocoa butter is beneficial.
    >
    > In other words, if I were to add those foods to my diet and wait 2 weeks, would the effects show
    > up in my blood work, or should I wait a month? Then drop those foods and wait "x" amount of time
    > to have blood work done again to see the effects for comparison.
    >
    > Hope I have worded this so that you know what I mean. Thanks, Don
     
  5. On 20 Feb 2004 04:59:15 -0800, [email protected] (francispoon)
    wrote:

    >The good thing about herbs is that they rarely produce side-effects.

    ................

    The above statement, although well-intended, is inaccurate.

    FP, I suggest you read "The Complete German Commission E Monographs," which is considered to be
    ultimate reference in herbal medicine.

    Atropia belladonna, for instance, is an herb. It is indicated for spasms and colic-like pain in the
    gastrointestinal tract and bile ducts. The side effects listed are dryness of mouth, decrease in
    secretion by the perspiration glands, accommodation disturbances, reddening and drynerss of skin,
    hyperthermia, tachycardia, dificulty in micturation, hallucination, and spasms.

    smn
     
  6. Francispoon

    Francispoon Guest

    [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Adding olive oil, almond butter, and peanut butter

    I am under the impression that peanuts have a lot of cholestrol. Is that true?

    FP
    ==============================================

    have improved my
    > lipids enough so I've been able to ditch statin drugs. Also, don't forget to eat fatty fish or
    > fish oil capsules. I eat 3.75 oz of herring daily. My ratio tot chol/hdl is now 3.1 - which is
    > good. Before, my tot chol was 250, hdl 35, trig 190.
    >
    >
    > "Don" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > How long after starting a new lifestyle/diet; that is, adding a certain food or foods to one's
    > > diet does it take for a change to show up in blood lipids?
    > >
    > > I've read that adding olive oil, peanut butter, and nuts (in moderation) to ones diet can be
    > > beneficial to heart health. However, everyone's metabolism is different. I'd like to try
    > > different foods to see what effect it has on my blood lipids (especially total cholesterol, HDL,
    > > LDL, and Triglycerides) but I am not sure how long to wait before requesting blood work.
    > >
    > > I've also read that dark chocolate that contains cocoa butter is beneficial.
    > >
    > > In other words, if I were to add those foods to my diet and wait 2 weeks, would the effects show
    > > up in my blood work, or should I wait a month? Then drop those foods and wait "x" amount of time
    > > to have blood work done again to see the effects for comparison.
    > >
    > > Hope I have worded this so that you know what I mean. Thanks, Don
     
  7. Don

    Don Guest

    I'd like to know too. I have read so many articles that have said "any kind of nuts" are good for
    lowering cholesterol, but my cardiologist said no and said "if" I have to have nuts, the only ones
    that might be beneficial are walnuts and pistachio.

    I wonder who is right? ha

    "francispoon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Adding olive oil, almond butter, and peanut butter
    >
    > I am under the impression that peanuts have a lot of cholestrol. Is that
    true?
    >
    > FP
    > ==============================================
    >
    > have improved my
    > > lipids enough so I've been able to ditch statin drugs. Also, don't forget to eat fatty fish or
    > > fish oil capsules. I eat 3.75 oz of herring daily. My ratio tot chol/hdl is now 3.1 - which is
    > > good. Before, my tot chol was 250, hdl 35, trig 190.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Don" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > How long after starting a new lifestyle/diet; that is, adding a
    certain food
    > > > or foods to one's diet does it take for a change to show up in blood
    lipids?
    > > >
    > > > I've read that adding olive oil, peanut butter, and nuts (in
    moderation) to
    > > > ones diet can be beneficial to heart health. However, everyone's
    metabolism
    > > > is different. I'd like to try different foods to see what effect it
    has on
    > > > my blood lipids (especially total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and
    Triglycerides)
    > > > but I am not sure how long to wait before requesting blood work.
    > > >
    > > > I've also read that dark chocolate that contains cocoa butter is
    beneficial.
    > > >
    > > > In other words, if I were to add those foods to my diet and wait 2
    weeks,
    > > > would the effects show up in my blood work, or should I wait a month?
    Then
    > > > drop those foods and wait "x" amount of time to have blood work done
    again
    > > > to see the effects for comparison.
    > > >
    > > > Hope I have worded this so that you know what I mean. Thanks, Don
     
  8. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 20-Feb-2004, "Don" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'd like to know too. I have read so many articles that have said "any kind of nuts" are good for
    > lowering cholesterol, but my cardiologist said no and said "if" I have to have nuts, the only ones
    > that might be beneficial are walnuts and pistachio.

    If you are craving something crunchy and nutty, then try roasted soy beans. To my knowledge, tree
    nuts have been associated with lowering risk factors, but have no clinical trials indicating a
    direct effect on atherosclerosis. It is progression of atherosclerosis that results in
    complications such as heart attack and stroke (among the miriad of other complications) and not the
    lipid profile itself.

    Soy protein isolate (not the extract) improves atherosclerosis according to this study...

    Atherosclerosis. 2003 Dec;171(2):163-70. Soy proteins reduce progression of a focal lesion and
    lipoprotein oxidiability in rabbits fed a cholesterol-rich diet.

    Castiglioni S, Manzoni C, D'Uva A, Spiezie R, Monteggia E, Chiesa G, Sirtori CR, Lovati MR.
    Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milano, Via Balzaretti 9, 20133, Milan, Italy

    The effects of different dietary proteins on the progression of a focal atheromatous lesion and on
    lipoprotein oxidiability were studied in male New Zealand rabbits. Focal lesions were induced on
    common carotid arteries by applying an electric current, using a bipolar microcoagulator. After
    surgery, animals were fed for 90 days two different diets, both with 1% cholesterol, 15% saturated
    fatty acids and 20% protein: the protein source was constituted in one group (SOY) by 16% soy
    protein isolate plus 4% milk whey proteins, in the other (CASEIN) by 16% casein plus 4% milk whey
    proteins. Lower levels of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides (-47 and -65%, respectively) (P<0.05)
    were detected in the SOY versus the CASEIN group at the end of treatment. Cryosection analyses of
    the carotids, indicated a highly significant reduction (-39%; P<0.05) in the focal lesion
    progression in the SOY versus the CASEIN group. Copper-mediated oxidation of low-density lipoprotein
    (LDL) from rabbits fed the two different diets, performed in vitro by analysis of conjugated diene
    formation, showed a significantly longer lag phase in the SOY (150+/-5min) versus the CASEIN animals
    (20+/-3min) (P<0.05). These data, while confirming the well-known lipid lowering properties of soy
    proteins, indicate, in this animal model, a remarkable activity on a focal atheromatous lesion,
    possibly also linked to a powerful antioxidant activity.
    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  9. Sonos wrote:

    > On 20-Feb-2004, "Don" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I'd like to know too. I have read so many articles that have said "any kind of nuts" are good
    > > for lowering cholesterol, but my cardiologist said no and said "if" I have to have nuts, the
    > > only ones that might be beneficial are walnuts and pistachio.
    >
    > If you are craving something crunchy and nutty, then try roasted soy beans. To my knowledge, tree
    > nuts have been associated with lowering risk factors, but have no clinical trials indicating a
    > direct effect on atherosclerosis. It is progression of atherosclerosis that results in
    > complications such as heart attack and stroke (among the miriad of other complications) and not
    > the lipid profile itself.
    >
    > Soy protein isolate (not the extract) improves atherosclerosis according to this study...
    >

    ...possibly by lowering cholesterol.

    "These data, while confirming the well-known lipid lowering properties of soy proteins..."

    >
    > Atherosclerosis. 2003 Dec;171(2):163-70. Soy proteins reduce progression of a focal lesion and
    > lipoprotein oxidiability in rabbits fed a cholesterol-rich diet.
    >
    > Castiglioni S, Manzoni C, D'Uva A, Spiezie R, Monteggia E, Chiesa G, Sirtori CR, Lovati MR.
    > Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milano, Via Balzaretti 9, 20133,
    > Milan, Italy
    >
    > The effects of different dietary proteins on the progression of a focal atheromatous lesion and on
    > lipoprotein oxidiability were studied in male New Zealand rabbits. Focal lesions were induced on
    > common carotid arteries by applying an electric current, using a bipolar microcoagulator. After
    > surgery, animals were fed for 90 days two different diets, both with 1% cholesterol, 15% saturated
    > fatty acids and 20% protein: the protein source was constituted in one group (SOY) by 16% soy
    > protein isolate plus 4% milk whey proteins, in the other (CASEIN) by 16% casein plus 4% milk whey
    > proteins. Lower levels of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides (-47 and -65%, respectively)
    > (P<0.05) were detected in the SOY versus the CASEIN group at the end of treatment. Cryosection
    > analyses of the carotids, indicated a highly significant reduction (-39%; P<0.05) in the focal
    > lesion progression in the SOY versus the CASEIN group. Copper-mediated oxidation of low-density
    > lipoprotein (LDL) from rabbits fed the two different diets, performed in vitro by analysis of
    > conjugated diene formation, showed a significantly longer lag phase in the SOY (150+/-5min) versus
    > the CASEIN animals (20+/-3min) (P<0.05). These data, while confirming the well-known lipid
    > lowering properties of soy proteins, indicate, in this animal model, a remarkable activity on a
    > focal atheromatous lesion, possibly also linked to a powerful antioxidant activity.
    > --
    > Winning against heart attack and stroke http://www.sonoscore.com

    Welcome back, Patrick :)

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?G1BB12C67

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  10. J Stutzmann

    J Stutzmann Guest

    From what I've read about the Portfolio Approach the results have been
    pretty dramatic after a relatively short time
    http://www.bupa.co.uk/health_information/html/health_news/201202vegdiet.html

    See also: A dietary portfolio approach to cholesterol reduction: combined effects of plant sterols,
    vegetable proteins, and viscous fibers in hypercholesterolemia.

    at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_ui
    ds=12489074&dopt=Abstract

    the study cited above showed results in 2-4 weeks.

    "Don" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > How long after starting a new lifestyle/diet; that is, adding a certain
    food
    > or foods to one's diet does it take for a change to show up in blood
    lipids?
    >
    > I've read that adding olive oil, peanut butter, and nuts (in moderation)
    to
    > ones diet can be beneficial to heart health. However, everyone's
    metabolism
    > is different. I'd like to try different foods to see what effect it has
    on
    > my blood lipids (especially total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and
    Triglycerides)
    > but I am not sure how long to wait before requesting blood work.
    >
    > I've also read that dark chocolate that contains cocoa butter is
    beneficial.
    >
    > In other words, if I were to add those foods to my diet and wait 2 weeks, would the effects show
    > up in my blood work, or should I wait a month?
    Then
    > drop those foods and wait "x" amount of time to have blood work done again to see the effects for
    > comparison.
    >
    > Hope I have worded this so that you know what I mean. Thanks, Don
    >
    >
    > --
    > ==============================
    > HAPPY NEW YEAR !!
    >
    > ==============================
    > My web page: http://webpages.charter.net/don12345
     
  11. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Fri, 20 Feb 2004 23:44:25 GMT in article
    <[email protected]> "Sonos" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >On 20-Feb-2004, "Don" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I'd like to know too. I have read so many articles that have said "any kind of nuts" are good for
    >> lowering cholesterol, but my cardiologist said no and said "if" I have to have nuts, the only
    >> ones that might be beneficial are walnuts and pistachio.
    >
    I think that most nuts, if not all, have some benefits. These nuts include also almonds, pecans,
    macadamias etc.

    >If you are craving something crunchy and nutty, then try roasted soy beans. To my knowledge, tree
    >nuts have been associated with lowering risk factors, but have no clinical trials indicating a
    >direct effect on atherosclerosis. It is progression of atherosclerosis that results in
    >complications such as heart attack and stroke (among the miriad of other complications) and not the
    >lipid profile itself.
    >
    I haven't seen any clinical trials either, but many epidemiological studies have shown an inverse
    association between frequent nut consumption and fatal and non-fatal CHD events. One cannot of
    course draw causal conclusions from epidemiological studies, but when evidence from these is
    combined with studies about nuts' effects on CHD risk factors, the circumstantial evidence about the
    benefits of nuts seems fairly strong, IMHO.

    Below references to some epidemiological and related studies and studies about nuts' effects on
    multiple risk factors. I've left out all the studies dealing only with lipid profiles.

    Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Parker TL, Connelly PW, Qian W, Haight JS, Faulkner D, Vidgen E,
    Lapsley KG, Spiller GA. Dose response of almonds on coronary heart disease risk factors: blood
    lipids, oxidized low-density lipoproteins, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, and pulmonary nitric oxide:
    a randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Circulation. 2002 Sep 10;106(11):1327-32.
    <URL:http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/106/11/1327>

    Albert CM, Gaziano JM, Willett WC, Manson JE. Nut consumption and decreased risk of sudden cardiac
    death in the Physicians' Health Study. Arch Intern Med. 2002 Jun 24;162(12):1382-7. PMID: 12076237
    [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=P-
    ubMed&list_uids=12076237&dopt=Abstract>

    Feldman EB. The scientific evidence for a beneficial health relationship between walnuts and
    coronary heart disease. J Nutr. 2002 May;132(5):1062S-1101S. Review.
    <URL:http://www.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/132/5/1062S>

    Ellsworth JL, Kushi LH, Folsom AR. Frequent nut intake and risk of death from coronary heart disease
    and all causes in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women's Health Study. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis.
    2001 Dec;11(6):372-7. PMID: 12055701 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.go-
    v/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12055701&dopt=Abstract>

    Kris-Etherton PM, Zhao G, Binkoski AE, Coval SM, Etherton TD. R The effects of nuts on coronary
    heart disease risk. Nutr Rev. 2001 Apr;59(4):103-11. Review. PMID: 11368503 [PubMed - indexed for
    MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=113685-
    03&dopt=Abstract>

    Hu FB, Stampfer MJ. Nut consumption and risk of coronary heart disease: a review of epidemiologic
    evidence. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 1999 Nov;1(3):204-9. PMID: 11122711 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11122711&dopt-
    =Abstract>

    Fraser GE. Nut consumption, lipids, and risk of a coronary event. Clin Cardiol. 1999 Jul;22(7 Suppl):III11-
    5. Review. PMID: 10410300 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/qu-
    ery.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10410300&dopt=Abstract>

    Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Manson JE, Rimm EB, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, Speizer FE, Hennekens CH, Willett WC.
    Frequent nut consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women: prospective cohort study. BMJ.
    1998 Nov 14;317(7169):1341-5. <URL:http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/317/7169/1341>

    Fraser GE, Sabate J, Beeson WL, Strahan TM. A possible protective effect of nut consumption on risk
    of coronary heart disease. The Adventist Health Study. Arch Intern Med. 1992 Jul;152(7):1416-24.
    PMID: 1627021 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] <URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd-
    =Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1627021&dopt=Abstract>

    --
    Matti Narkia
     
  12. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Sat, 21 Feb 2004 18:27:53 +0200 in article
    <[email protected]> Matti Narkia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Fri, 20 Feb 2004 23:44:25 GMT in article <[email protected]> "Sonos"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>On 20-Feb-2004, "Don" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'd like to know too. I have read so many articles that have said "any kind of nuts" are good
    >>> for lowering cholesterol, but my cardiologist said no and said "if" I have to have nuts, the
    >>> only ones that might be beneficial are walnuts and pistachio.
    >>
    >I think that most nuts, if not all, have some benefits. These nuts include also almonds, pecans,
    >macadamias etc.
    >
    >>If you are craving something crunchy and nutty, then try roasted soy beans. To my knowledge, tree
    >>nuts have been associated with lowering risk factors, but have no clinical trials indicating a
    >>direct effect on atherosclerosis. It is progression of atherosclerosis that results in
    >>complications such as heart attack and stroke (among the miriad of other complications) and not
    >>the lipid profile itself.
    >>
    >I haven't seen any clinical trials either, but many epidemiological studies have shown an inverse
    >association between frequent nut consumption and fatal and non-fatal CHD events. One cannot of
    >course draw causal conclusions from epidemiological studies, but when evidence from these is
    >combined with studies about nuts' effects on CHD risk factors, the circumstantial evidence about
    >the benefits of nuts seems fairly strong, IMHO.
    >
    >Below references to some epidemiological and related studies and studies about nuts' effects on
    >multiple risk factors. I've left out all the studies dealing only with lipid profiles.
    >
    >Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Parker TL, Connelly PW, Qian W, Haight JS, Faulkner D, Vidgen E,
    >Lapsley KG, Spiller GA. Dose response of almonds on coronary heart disease risk factors: blood
    >lipids, oxidized low-density lipoproteins, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, and pulmonary nitric
    >oxide: a randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Circulation. 2002 Sep 10;106(11):1327-32.
    ><URL:http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/106/11/1327>
    >
    The above study is commented in the article

    A Bit of Joy to Share About Almonds Journal Watch Cardiology, October 4, 2002; 2002(1004): 3 - 3.
    <URL:http://cardiology.jwatch.org/cgi/content/full/2002/1004/3>

    --
    Matti Narkia
     
  13. Don,

    no plant foods have any cholesterol. Your doc is wrong about nuts - they improve lipid profiles
    (generally raises HDL). True, walnuts and almonds are particularly good, but peanuts are fine.
    "Monounsaturated Fats: Olives; olive oil, canola oil, peanut oil; cashews, almonds, peanuts, and
    most other nuts; avocados - Lowers LDL; raises HDL " From "Nutrition Source" from Harvard - see
    http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/fats.html

    "Don" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'd like to know too. I have read so many articles that have said "any kind of nuts" are good for
    > lowering cholesterol, but my cardiologist said no and said "if" I have to have nuts, the only ones
    > that might be beneficial are walnuts and pistachio.
    >
    > I wonder who is right? ha
    >
    >
    > "francispoon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > Adding olive oil, almond butter, and peanut butter
    > >
    > > I am under the impression that peanuts have a lot of cholestrol. Is that
    > true?
    > >
    > > FP
    > > ==============================================
    > >
    > > have improved my
    > > > lipids enough so I've been able to ditch statin drugs. Also, don't forget to eat fatty fish or
    > > > fish oil capsules. I eat 3.75 oz of herring daily. My ratio tot chol/hdl is now 3.1 - which is
    > > > good. Before, my tot chol was 250, hdl 35, trig 190.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Don" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > How long after starting a new lifestyle/diet; that is, adding a
    > certain food
    > > > > or foods to one's diet does it take for a change to show up in blood
    > lipids?
    > > > >
    > > > > I've read that adding olive oil, peanut butter, and nuts (in
    > moderation) to
    > > > > ones diet can be beneficial to heart health. However, everyone's
    > metabolism
    > > > > is different. I'd like to try different foods to see what effect it
    > has on
    > > > > my blood lipids (especially total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and
    > Triglycerides)
    > > > > but I am not sure how long to wait before requesting blood work.
    > > > >
    > > > > I've also read that dark chocolate that contains cocoa butter is
    > beneficial.
    > > > >
    > > > > In other words, if I were to add those foods to my diet and wait 2
    > weeks,
    > > > > would the effects show up in my blood work, or should I wait a month?
    > Then
    > > > > drop those foods and wait "x" amount of time to have blood work done
    > again
    > > > > to see the effects for comparison.
    > > > >
    > > > > Hope I have worded this so that you know what I mean. Thanks, Don
     
  14. Susan

    Susan Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    >The good thing about herbs is that they rarely produce side-effects.
    >
    >FP

    Boy, is this ever untrue! I've had severe reactions and side effects from echinacea, chamomile,
    black cohosh, etc...

    Anything strong enough to help you is strong enough to hurt you.

    Susan
     
  15. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 21-Feb-2004, [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote:

    > From "Nutrition Source" from Harvard - see http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/fats.html

    """Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) carry cholesterol from the liver to the rest of the body. When
    there is too much LDL cholesterol in the blood, it can be deposited on the walls of the coronary
    arteries. Because of this, LDL cholesterol is often referred to as the "bad" cholesterol.""" I liked
    the chart about the different types of dietary fats, but I think the author missed the boat with
    discussion about LDL and disease. As the quoted exerpt above indicates, the author does not appear
    to take into consideration the "good" LDL particle subfractions.

    Thanks Brad - nice link.

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  16. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 21-Feb-2004, Matti Narkia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > but when evidence from these is combined with studies about nuts' effects on CHD risk factors, the
    > circumstantial evidence about the benefits of nuts seems fairly strong, IMHO.

    i think so too.

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  17. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    I could not get this link to work...
    > http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_ui
    > ds=12489074&dopt=Abstract
    this one works...
    > http://www.bupa.co.uk/health_information/html/health_news/201202vegdiet.html
    exerpt: "According to Professor David Jenkins: "This opens up the possibility that diet can be used
    much more widely to lower blood cholesterol and possibly spare some individuals from having to take
    drugs." Dr Cyril Kendall, another researcher, says: "There's still an important place for statin
    therapy, particularly for individuals with very high cholesterol levels or those who find it
    difficult to follow this type of dietary approach." However, he also points out that "dietary
    approaches may be effective if their use enables individuals to use lower doses of statins"." ~~~
    wow, this is a great statement by Jenkins, exept for the part about high cholesterol by Kendall.
    instead of calling it a 'diet', why not take the perspective as follows...

    1. food is medicine
    2. nutritional supplements can make your food even healthier

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  18. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

  19. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 21-Feb-2004, "J Stutzmann" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > From what I've read about the Portfolio Approach the results have been pretty dramatic after a
    > relatively short time http://www.bupa.co.uk/health_information/html/health_news/201202vegdiet.html
    >
    > See also: A dietary portfolio approach to cholesterol reduction: combined effects of plant
    > sterols, vegetable proteins, and viscous fibers in hypercholesterolemia.
    >
    > at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_ui
    > ds=12489074&dopt=Abstract
    >
    > the study cited above showed results in 2-4 weeks.

    Anyone with practical sources of plant sterols? I know phytosterol concentrate has beta-sitosterol,
    campesterol, stigmasterol and brassicasterol in it, but I have recommended it mostly as a food
    supplement and not an actual food source for lack of a reliable source. Flax?

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  20. Zee

    Zee Guest

    Brad--the herring? Is it in various flavoured sauces, or salted and in a brine? Or are you buying it
    fresh, or smoked? B'adant

    Here's a bread recipe to put your herring on:

    Matbrod

    5 cups (1.25 L) light rye flour 2 tsp (10 mL) baking soda 1 tsp (5 mL) baking powder 1 tbsp (15 mL)
    salt 1-1/2 tsp (8 mL) whole cumin seeds 2 cups (500 mL) whole-milk plain yogurt
    1/2 cup (125 mL) milk
    2/4 cup (50 mL) liquid honey

    Step 1: Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C). Butter two 8" x 4" (1.5 L) loaf pans.

    Step 2: In large bowl, stir together flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cumin seeds. In
    separate bowl, mix together yogurt, milk and honey; stir to blend well. (If the honey is stiff, warm
    it a little to make it more liquid before mixing with the yogurt and milk).

    Step 3: Pour yogurt mixture into flour mixture and stir until dry ingredients are well moistened.
    The mixture will be sticky but quite stiff. Stir vigorously for several minutes. Divide dough evenly
    among prepared pans, smoothing tops with wet spatula.

    Step 4: Place in centre of oven. Lower heat to 385°F (195°C). Bake for 30 minutes, then lower heat
    to 350°F (180°C) and bake another 20 minutes or until loaves have pulled away from sides of pans and
    a skewer inserted in centre comes out clean.

    Step 5: Turn loaves out of pans onto rack. (The loaves wil be about 2" high.) Let cool for at least
    two hours before slicing, to give loaves time to firm up. Makes 2 4" x 8" (10 cm x 20 cm) loaves.
    Slice thinly.

    The only problem with this bread is you want to spread it with sweet butter.

    [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Adding olive oil, almond butter, and peanut butter have improved my lipids enough so I've been
    > able to ditch statin drugs. Also, don't forget to eat fatty fish or fish oil capsules. I eat 3.75
    > oz of herring daily. My ratio tot chol/hdl is now 3.1 - which is good. Before, my tot chol was
    > 250, hdl 35, trig 190.
    >
    >
    > "Don" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > How long after starting a new lifestyle/diet; that is, adding a certain food or foods to one's
    > > diet does it take for a change to show up in blood lipids?
    > >
    > > I've read that adding olive oil, peanut butter, and nuts (in moderation) to ones diet can be
    > > beneficial to heart health. However, everyone's metabolism is different. I'd like to try
    > > different foods to see what effect it has on my blood lipids (especially total cholesterol, HDL,
    > > LDL, and Triglycerides) but I am not sure how long to wait before requesting blood work.
    > >
    > > I've also read that dark chocolate that contains cocoa butter is beneficial.
    > >
    > > In other words, if I were to add those foods to my diet and wait 2 weeks, would the effects show
    > > up in my blood work, or should I wait a month? Then drop those foods and wait "x" amount of time
    > > to have blood work done again to see the effects for comparison.
    > >
    > > Hope I have worded this so that you know what I mean. Thanks, Don
     
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