Blood/Plasma donation question.

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Mike, Dec 9, 2003.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Just wondering if there is a serious health risk involved here.
    Yesterday I went to the local blood bank to donate. They only managed
    to get half a pint before giving up. I wonder if it would be
    dangerous for me to go donate plasma later this week. I am a 27 year
    old male, 230 pounds and 6'1".

    To me, half a pint does not seem like that much. I have never donated
    plasma before, but I hear they put saline and most of the blood back
    in you. If I was well hydrated would this be a problem?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. "Mike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Just wondering if there is a serious health risk involved here.
    > Yesterday I went to the local blood bank to donate. They only managed
    > to get half a pint before giving up. I wonder if it would be
    > dangerous for me to go donate plasma later this week. I am a 27 year
    > old male, 230 pounds and 6'1".
    >
    > To me, half a pint does not seem like that much. I have never donated
    > plasma before, but I hear they put saline and most of the blood back
    > in you. If I was well hydrated would this be a problem?
    >
    > Thanks.


    Okay, here are the risks. There is a small risk of infection at the site of
    the intravenous puncture. The technicians or nurses should clean the site
    thoroughly with alcohol, iodine, or both before inserting the catheter
    [needle]. There is a very small risk of damage to blood vessels, tendons,
    and nerves in the access procedure. There is an even smaller risk of a
    dangerous drop in blood pressure while the blood is collected. (Why did they
    only manage to get half a pint before giving up? Poorly accessed vein, or
    too small a vein selected?) There is an extremely small risk that the wrong
    red cells, from some other donor, could be returned to you, causing a severe
    blood reaction. Bleeding at the IV site after the procedure can occur.
    Catheters or needles have been known to break loose from the collection
    system and travel in the circulatory system. I doubt that there are any
    plasma collection centers in the world that do not use single use disposable
    equipment, but if you are posting from some very remote third-world location
    where needles are reused, the possibility of transmission of infectious
    disease must be considered. The risks of losing a "pint" of plasma are
    negligible. Believe me, you won't miss it.

    With all that, are you what is called a "remunerated donor"? All these risks
    are small, perhaps even insignificant, but it seems that a big guy like
    could find a better way to make a few bucks. Good luck.

    --Rich
     
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