blueberries jam

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by merlijn spinnewijn, Feb 6, 2006.

  1. They say that blueberries are packed with anti-oxydants.
    Do they survive during the production of blueberries jam?
     
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  2. IanW

    IanW Guest

    "merlijn spinnewijn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > They say that blueberries are packed with anti-oxydants.
    > Do they survive during the production of blueberries jam?


    some will, some wont but the question I'd be asking is that would the
    benefit of the antioxidants be outweighed by the intake of added sugar
    present in the jam?

    Ian
     
  3. "IanW" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "merlijn spinnewijn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > They say that blueberries are packed with anti-oxydants.
    > > Do they survive during the production of blueberries jam?

    >
    > some will, some wont but the question I'd be asking is that would the
    > benefit of the antioxidants be outweighed by the intake of added sugar
    > present in the jam?
    >
    > Ian


    Is it possible to eliminate the disadvantages of added sugar by
    drinking some lemon juice keeping glycemic load low?
    Merlin
     
  4. Knack

    Knack Guest

    "merlijn spinnewijn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "IanW" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "merlijn spinnewijn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > They say that blueberries are packed with anti-oxydants.
    >> > Do they survive during the production of blueberries jam?

    >>
    >> some will, some wont but the question I'd be asking is that would the
    >> benefit of the antioxidants be outweighed by the intake of added sugar
    >> present in the jam?
    >>
    >> Ian

    >
    > Is it possible to eliminate the disadvantages of added sugar by
    > drinking some lemon juice keeping glycemic load low?
    > Merlin
    >


    Yes, tht will reduce the GI of the meal. Or you can have the jam with some
    other acidic food such as yogurt or kefir (both cotain lactic acid). Or you
    can consume a soluble fiber food with the jam so as to slow down its
    digestion.

    More elegant solution is to choose frozen wild organic blueberries instead
    of blueberry jam. Wild blueberries are tiny, which means that their
    proportion of skin to flesh is greater than in cultivated blueberries.
    Consequently wild blueberries have a significantly greater antioxidant
    flavonoid content and a far lower sugar content than do cultivated
    blueberries, which are larger and sweeter. You can sweeten wild blueberries
    with stevia extract instead of sugar.
     
  5. "Knack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "merlijn spinnewijn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "IanW" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>> "merlijn spinnewijn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>> > They say that blueberries are packed with anti-oxydants.
    >>> > Do they survive during the production of blueberries jam?
    >>>
    >>> some will, some wont but the question I'd be asking is that would the
    >>> benefit of the antioxidants be outweighed by the intake of added sugar
    >>> present in the jam?
    >>>
    >>> Ian

    >>
    >> Is it possible to eliminate the disadvantages of added sugar by
    >> drinking some lemon juice keeping glycemic load low?
    >> Merlin
    >>

    >
    > Yes, tht will reduce the GI of the meal. Or you can have the jam with some
    > other acidic food such as yogurt or kefir (both cotain lactic acid). Or
    > you can consume a soluble fiber food with the jam so as to slow down its
    > digestion.
    >
    > More elegant solution is to choose frozen wild organic blueberries instead
    > of blueberry jam. Wild blueberries are tiny, which means that their
    > proportion of skin to flesh is greater than in cultivated blueberries.
    > Consequently wild blueberries have a significantly greater antioxidant
    > flavonoid content and a far lower sugar content than do cultivated
    > blueberries, which are larger and sweeter. You can sweeten wild
    > blueberries with stevia extract instead of sugar.


    Yes, just blueberries, and the wild blueberries are better
    in my opinion and to my taste. I just sweeten them with
    my saliva when I eat them. : o )

    George
     
  6. IanW

    IanW Guest

    "George Cherry" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]

    > Yes, just blueberries, and the wild blueberries are better
    > in my opinion and to my taste. I just sweeten them with
    > my saliva when I eat them. : o )


    Yeah, wild blueberries (or Bilberries as they are commonly known over here)
    have more flavour than blueberries. What really brings out their flavour I
    find is to heat them veyr gently (which shouldn't take too much of the
    antioxidant value out of them) and then pour them over a generous dollop of
    vanilla ice-cream.. so much for the healthy diet but they do taste fantastic
    that way :)
     
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