Blur LT vs Intense 5.5 EVP?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bob Flumere, Sep 6, 2005.

  1. Bob Flumere

    Bob Flumere Guest

    Anybody..
    Good, bad, indifferent??

    Which to build?
    Anybody here got a 5.5 Evp with bearing probs (or not)??
     
    Tags:


  2. GeeDubb

    GeeDubb Guest

    Bob Flumere wrote:
    > Anybody..
    > Good, bad, indifferent??
    >
    > Which to build?
    > Anybody here got a 5.5 Evp with bearing probs (or not)??


    Don't know about the Intense but several of the people I know with Blurs
    have had frames break. Santa Cruze warranteed the frames but what a pain.

    Gary
     
  3. K.

    K. Guest

    Until the last couple of years I would have tried to sell you on the
    SC, but based on my own and a very large (and growing) # of folks
    having lots of trouble with SC bike reliability I'd have to suggest you
    stay away from them. I never had any quality issues with my first SC I
    bought 7 or 8 years ago, but after killing that one (my fault not
    theirs) I have had nothing but issues with the replacement(s) for that
    one (replaced w/ an '03 Heckler). SC has been "good enough" to send
    new parts/frames each time, but...

    Who wants to wait 2-4 months (longer?) for a new swing-arm/whatever
    even if they don't "have" to pay?

    I haven't ridden the Intense, but loved the Turner I rode a little
    while back (5 spot). Stay away from the SC there's too much baggage or
    chance for issues any more. I'm saving (slowly) for a new frame and
    will *not* be considering anything SC is offering unless and untill
    they demonstrate some *significant* improvements in their quality
    control and such. Who knows, as long as it could take me to save a
    couple grand SC could change for the better, but don't hold your
    breath.

    Kraig...
     
  4. JD

    JD Guest

    Bob Flumere wrote:
    > Anybody..
    > Good, bad, indifferent??
    >
    > Which to build?
    > Anybody here got a 5.5 Evp with bearing probs (or not)??



    Ask yourself this question, who is actually fabricating those frames?
    If you're going to pay a botique bike price, you had better be getting
    a well designed and well built frame, built with attention to detail
    instead of attention to profits.

    Take a long, hard look at santa crud and see what they actually are.
    They are a marketing and design company, not a bicycle manufacturer.
    I'm not sure how many places their bikes have been manufactured (Reco
    Diver may have that answer) the past ten years, but I'd wager that it's
    not just one place. Most of their designs are antiquated (by modern
    mtb standards) and/or "borrowed" (the blurb). They have major brand
    recognition because of their unfortunate longevity as a brand name,
    starting with surfboards and skateboards at least as early as the
    1970's. They proliferate the mtb ragazines with their advertisements,
    as well as "product tests" where the same ragazines don't wish to lose
    revenue by telling the truth about their biggest advertisers' crappy
    offerings. Paying $1500+ for a frame of antiquated design and average
    materials/fabrication is ridiculous.

    JD
     
  5. TJ

    TJ Guest

    "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Bob Flumere wrote:
    >> Anybody..
    >> Good, bad, indifferent??
    >>
    >> Which to build?
    >> Anybody here got a 5.5 Evp with bearing probs (or not)??

    >
    >
    > Ask yourself this question, who is actually fabricating those frames?
    > If you're going to pay a botique bike price, you had better be getting
    > a well designed and well built frame, built with attention to detail
    > instead of attention to profits.
    >
    > Take a long, hard look at santa crud and see what they actually are.
    > They are a marketing and design company, not a bicycle manufacturer.
    > I'm not sure how many places their bikes have been manufactured (Reco
    > Diver may have that answer) the past ten years, but I'd wager that it's
    > not just one place. Most of their designs are antiquated (by modern
    > mtb standards) and/or "borrowed" (the blurb). They have major brand
    > recognition because of their unfortunate longevity as a brand name,
    > starting with surfboards and skateboards at least as early as the
    > 1970's. They proliferate the mtb ragazines with their advertisements,
    > as well as "product tests" where the same ragazines don't wish to lose
    > revenue by telling the truth about their biggest advertisers' crappy
    > offerings. Paying $1500+ for a frame of antiquated design and average
    > materials/fabrication is ridiculous.
    >
    > JD
    >

    I am turning to the dark side. I have developed a fetish for Crackandfail
    bikes. My new roadbike is a six/13. Talk about loading it up with
    technology. I am impressed with what Cannondale has done. If you really
    want a laugh though, get one of their warranty books and read it. They are
    NOT Santa Crud, thats for sure. All their bikes are built in the good ol US
    of A.

    TJ
     
  6. JD

    JD Guest

    TJ wrote:
    > "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > Bob Flumere wrote:
    > >> Anybody..
    > >> Good, bad, indifferent??
    > >>
    > >> Which to build?
    > >> Anybody here got a 5.5 Evp with bearing probs (or not)??

    > >
    > >
    > > Ask yourself this question, who is actually fabricating those frames?
    > > If you're going to pay a botique bike price, you had better be getting
    > > a well designed and well built frame, built with attention to detail
    > > instead of attention to profits.
    > >
    > > Take a long, hard look at santa crud and see what they actually are.
    > > They are a marketing and design company, not a bicycle manufacturer.
    > > I'm not sure how many places their bikes have been manufactured (Reco
    > > Diver may have that answer) the past ten years, but I'd wager that it's
    > > not just one place. Most of their designs are antiquated (by modern
    > > mtb standards) and/or "borrowed" (the blurb). They have major brand
    > > recognition because of their unfortunate longevity as a brand name,
    > > starting with surfboards and skateboards at least as early as the
    > > 1970's. They proliferate the mtb ragazines with their advertisements,
    > > as well as "product tests" where the same ragazines don't wish to lose
    > > revenue by telling the truth about their biggest advertisers' crappy
    > > offerings. Paying $1500+ for a frame of antiquated design and average
    > > materials/fabrication is ridiculous.
    > >
    > > JD
    > >

    > I am turning to the dark side. I have developed a fetish for Crackandfail
    > bikes. My new roadbike is a six/13. Talk about loading it up with
    > technology. I am impressed with what Cannondale has done. If you really
    > want a laugh though, get one of their warranty books and read it. They are
    > NOT Santa Crud, thats for sure. All their bikes are built in the good ol US
    > of A.
    >
    > TJ



    Road bikes are what crackandflail should stick to. Technology belongs
    on the road, not the trail. Did you buy your bike from Lupcho in
    Vernal or Ashley in GJ?

    JD
     
  7. TJ

    TJ Guest

    "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > TJ wrote:
    >> "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> >
    >> > Bob Flumere wrote:
    >> >> Anybody..
    >> >> Good, bad, indifferent??
    >> >>
    >> >> Which to build?
    >> >> Anybody here got a 5.5 Evp with bearing probs (or not)??
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Ask yourself this question, who is actually fabricating those frames?
    >> > If you're going to pay a botique bike price, you had better be getting
    >> > a well designed and well built frame, built with attention to detail
    >> > instead of attention to profits.
    >> >
    >> > Take a long, hard look at santa crud and see what they actually are.
    >> > They are a marketing and design company, not a bicycle manufacturer.
    >> > I'm not sure how many places their bikes have been manufactured (Reco
    >> > Diver may have that answer) the past ten years, but I'd wager that it's
    >> > not just one place. Most of their designs are antiquated (by modern
    >> > mtb standards) and/or "borrowed" (the blurb). They have major brand
    >> > recognition because of their unfortunate longevity as a brand name,
    >> > starting with surfboards and skateboards at least as early as the
    >> > 1970's. They proliferate the mtb ragazines with their advertisements,
    >> > as well as "product tests" where the same ragazines don't wish to lose
    >> > revenue by telling the truth about their biggest advertisers' crappy
    >> > offerings. Paying $1500+ for a frame of antiquated design and average
    >> > materials/fabrication is ridiculous.
    >> >
    >> > JD
    >> >

    >> I am turning to the dark side. I have developed a fetish for
    >> Crackandfail
    >> bikes. My new roadbike is a six/13. Talk about loading it up with
    >> technology. I am impressed with what Cannondale has done. If you really
    >> want a laugh though, get one of their warranty books and read it. They
    >> are
    >> NOT Santa Crud, thats for sure. All their bikes are built in the good ol
    >> US
    >> of A.
    >>
    >> TJ

    >
    >
    > Road bikes are what crackandflail should stick to. Technology belongs
    > on the road, not the trail. Did you buy your bike from Lupcho in
    > Vernal or Ashley in GJ?
    >
    > JD
    >


    I bought it from Ashley. I have been up there wrenching on a couple of
    occasions. All their staff went back to school, and bike sales here have
    been going bonkers. It is a good time to be a bicycle rider in GJ.

    TJ
     
  8. MattB

    MattB Guest

    TJ wrote:
    > "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>TJ wrote:
    >>
    >>>"JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>>Bob Flumere wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Anybody..
    >>>>>Good, bad, indifferent??
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Which to build?
    >>>>>Anybody here got a 5.5 Evp with bearing probs (or not)??
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Ask yourself this question, who is actually fabricating those frames?
    >>>>If you're going to pay a botique bike price, you had better be getting
    >>>>a well designed and well built frame, built with attention to detail
    >>>>instead of attention to profits.
    >>>>
    >>>>Take a long, hard look at santa crud and see what they actually are.
    >>>>They are a marketing and design company, not a bicycle manufacturer.
    >>>>I'm not sure how many places their bikes have been manufactured (Reco
    >>>>Diver may have that answer) the past ten years, but I'd wager that it's
    >>>>not just one place. Most of their designs are antiquated (by modern
    >>>>mtb standards) and/or "borrowed" (the blurb). They have major brand
    >>>>recognition because of their unfortunate longevity as a brand name,
    >>>>starting with surfboards and skateboards at least as early as the
    >>>>1970's. They proliferate the mtb ragazines with their advertisements,
    >>>>as well as "product tests" where the same ragazines don't wish to lose
    >>>>revenue by telling the truth about their biggest advertisers' crappy
    >>>>offerings. Paying $1500+ for a frame of antiquated design and average
    >>>>materials/fabrication is ridiculous.
    >>>>
    >>>>JD
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>I am turning to the dark side. I have developed a fetish for
    >>>Crackandfail
    >>>bikes. My new roadbike is a six/13. Talk about loading it up with
    >>>technology. I am impressed with what Cannondale has done. If you really
    >>>want a laugh though, get one of their warranty books and read it. They
    >>>are
    >>>NOT Santa Crud, thats for sure. All their bikes are built in the good ol
    >>>US
    >>>of A.
    >>>
    >>>TJ

    >>
    >>
    >>Road bikes are what crackandflail should stick to. Technology belongs
    >>on the road, not the trail. Did you buy your bike from Lupcho in
    >>Vernal or Ashley in GJ?
    >>
    >>JD
    >>

    >
    >
    > I bought it from Ashley. I have been up there wrenching on a couple of
    > occasions. All their staff went back to school, and bike sales here have
    > been going bonkers. It is a good time to be a bicycle rider in GJ.
    >
    > TJ
    >
    >


    Sales here are great too. Even before gas went through the roof.
    My LBS buddy had a big sale and sold like 35 bikes in a week. In a town
    this size that a significant portion of the population getting new bikes!

    Matt
     
  9. JD

    JD Guest

    MattB wrote:
    > TJ wrote:
    > > I bought it from Ashley. I have been up there wrenching on a couple of
    > > occasions. All their staff went back to school, and bike sales here have
    > > been going bonkers. It is a good time to be a bicycle rider in GJ.



    Any time is a good time to ride in GJ, my friend.

    > Sales here are great too. Even before gas went through the roof.
    > My LBS buddy had a big sale and sold like 35 bikes in a week. In a town
    > this size that a significant portion of the population getting new bikes!



    The G-Spot is definitely a lot more bike friendly on the road than GJ
    is.

    JD
     
  10. TJ

    TJ Guest

    "MattB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > TJ wrote:
    >> "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>TJ wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>"JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>news:[email protected]
    >>>>
    >>>>>Bob Flumere wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Anybody..
    >>>>>>Good, bad, indifferent??
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Which to build?
    >>>>>>Anybody here got a 5.5 Evp with bearing probs (or not)??
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Ask yourself this question, who is actually fabricating those frames?
    >>>>>If you're going to pay a botique bike price, you had better be getting
    >>>>>a well designed and well built frame, built with attention to detail
    >>>>>instead of attention to profits.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Take a long, hard look at santa crud and see what they actually are.
    >>>>>They are a marketing and design company, not a bicycle manufacturer.
    >>>>>I'm not sure how many places their bikes have been manufactured (Reco
    >>>>>Diver may have that answer) the past ten years, but I'd wager that it's
    >>>>>not just one place. Most of their designs are antiquated (by modern
    >>>>>mtb standards) and/or "borrowed" (the blurb). They have major brand
    >>>>>recognition because of their unfortunate longevity as a brand name,
    >>>>>starting with surfboards and skateboards at least as early as the
    >>>>>1970's. They proliferate the mtb ragazines with their advertisements,
    >>>>>as well as "product tests" where the same ragazines don't wish to lose
    >>>>>revenue by telling the truth about their biggest advertisers' crappy
    >>>>>offerings. Paying $1500+ for a frame of antiquated design and average
    >>>>>materials/fabrication is ridiculous.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>JD
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I am turning to the dark side. I have developed a fetish for
    >>>>Crackandfail
    >>>>bikes. My new roadbike is a six/13. Talk about loading it up with
    >>>>technology. I am impressed with what Cannondale has done. If you
    >>>>really
    >>>>want a laugh though, get one of their warranty books and read it. They
    >>>>are
    >>>>NOT Santa Crud, thats for sure. All their bikes are built in the good
    >>>>ol US
    >>>>of A.
    >>>>
    >>>>TJ
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Road bikes are what crackandflail should stick to. Technology belongs
    >>>on the road, not the trail. Did you buy your bike from Lupcho in
    >>>Vernal or Ashley in GJ?
    >>>
    >>>JD
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> I bought it from Ashley. I have been up there wrenching on a couple of
    >> occasions. All their staff went back to school, and bike sales here have
    >> been going bonkers. It is a good time to be a bicycle rider in GJ.
    >>
    >> TJ
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Sales here are great too. Even before gas went through the roof.
    > My LBS buddy had a big sale and sold like 35 bikes in a week. In a town
    > this size that a significant portion of the population getting new bikes!
    >
    > Matt


    WOW! That rivals the shops here in GJ. Most of the bikes heading out the
    door here are comfort bikes. Good to see more people on mopeds, and
    bicycles.

    TJ
     
  11. I would rather be Intense then a Blur.
     
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