{BNE} Keeping cyclists and pedestrians honest

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by cfsmtb, Jul 12, 2006.

  1. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Timely article from ABC Brisbane regarding cyclist/ped interactions.

    ****************************
    Keeping cyclists and pedestrians honest
    http://www.abc.net.au/brisbane/stories/s1684746.htm?brisbane
    Wednesday, 12 July 2006. Reporter: Phil Smith

    Presenter: Kelly Higgins-Devine photo of Bike stops at stop sign
    A rider observes a stop sign on Coronation Drive

    Statistically, the most dangerous circumstance is in a car on the highway, but as this week’s fatal inner-city accident involving a cyclist and a pedestrian shows, lives are at risk, even at walking pace.

    During 2005, 37 pedestrians and five cyclists were killed on the roads. That equals significant reductions from 2004: 12% and 40% for walkers and riders respectively.

    [/url]Whether those reductions can continue is a good question, because already in 2006, 6 cyclists and 25 pedestrians have died on our roads, and it seems that as our population grows, conditions for cyclists and pedestrians could become even more dangerous.

    Now more people are getting out of their cars and taking to the streets on foot or by pedal power. Australia-wide, bicycles outsold motorcars again last financial year with well over a million new bikes on the roads. The battle against obesity also sees a community-wide push to encourage more people to walk or cycle to school, work and play.

    So will laws, designed to keep pedestrians and cyclists in line, be enforced? The Pedestrian Council's Howard Scruby is sceptical.

    "I can’t remember the last time a pedestrian was booked in the country for crossing against the lights," he says. "It’s a law the police tend to have forgotten to enforce. And in our view, the penalties should be a lot higher and perhaps the enforcement function could be transferred to councils if police don’t want to be involved in it."

    Howard also worries that the situation for pedestrians will become more dangerous as our population ages. "We’e had several cases in Sydney where bicycle couriers have killed pedestrians, where the pedestrians are 70 and over – if they get hit by a large 100kg cyclist at 30km/hr, they rarely get up."

    Queensland Police Acting Superintendent Rob McCall insists there are periodic crackdowns to enforce traffic laws applying to pedestrians and cyclists, and there’ll be more as foot and cycle traffic increases.

    "Generally throughout the year, we have a bit of a crackdown on pedestrian crossings – it’s really a regional matter – they’ll target particular crossings, you’ll look at your [intelligence] in terms of where there’s already been fatalities and you’ll see police issuing tickets," he says.

    Bicycle Queensland’s Ben Wilson expects tougher enforcement.

    "I’d expect to see it, and we’d welcome it," he says, "because if there are people out there flouting the laws, then they’re doing themselves a disservice and they’re doing the cuase of people on bicycles a disservice and the people on foot a disservice. Sadly, from time to time we need a reality check on what we’re doing."

    Related Links:
    Some of these links may be to sites outside the ABC and as such the ABC has no editorial control over such sites.

    The Queensland Government's Road Safety website
    http://www.roadsafety.qld.gov.au

    Bicycle Queensland
    http://www.bq.org.au

    Pedestrian Council of Australia
    http://www.walk.com.au/pedestriancouncil/page.asp?pageid=1647
     
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  2. In aus.bicycle on Thu, 13 Jul 2006 13:31:13 +1000
    cfsmtb <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "I’d expect to see it, and we’d welcome it," he says, "because if there
    > are people out there flouting the laws, then they’re doing themselves a
    > disservice and they’re doing the cuase of people on bicycles a
    > disservice and the people on foot a disservice. Sadly, from time to
    > time we need a reality check on what we’re doing."


    Used to be I'd see mainly lycra types on fancy race bikes running
    reds, now it's more varied.

    I don't see many lycra types on my commute (although the couple I have
    seen haven't been very law abiding and yes, one did run a red) but
    light discipline isn't big at all for all kinds of riders. I often
    feel quite lonely sitting at the lights....

    Riding on footpaths is common, usually because riding on the road is
    seen as more dangerous. The biggie on my ride is Pyrmont Bridge Rd
    near the Anzac Bridge feeder. Narrow lanes, a left turn and
    left/straight lane make it hard for a rider wanting to go straight
    ahead to stay on the road. So most hop the footpath and cross at the
    ped lights and the zebra.

    Some continue on the footpath, I get back on the road as the traffic's
    not moving that much faster than I am and left turners slow it lots.

    I see a lot of redlight running there, and a fair bit of bikes in all
    directions at the Pyrmont bridge itself. Any gap is good enough for a
    bike or 5 to cross in any direction.

    Kent St is another one where there's a lot of footpath riding. People
    coming off the bridge cross Kent St and get on the path either all the
    way to King St or to turn right at the previous intersection. Lots of
    footpath riding on Sussex(?) to get to the King St lights and get onto
    the Pyrmont Bridge path.

    All this is because the road design makes it difficult to do anything
    else. Not impossible by any means, but more difficult. As more and
    more people ride bicycles, there will be more and more "I can do it so
    I will" happening.

    Zebee
     
  3. DaveB

    DaveB Guest

    cfsmtb wrote:
    >
    > During 2005, 37 pedestrians and five cyclists were killed on the roads.
    > That equals significant reductions from 2004: 12% and 40% for walkers
    > and riders respectively.
    >


    Oh FFS, I wish they would create a course in correct use of statistics
    for journo's. There's nothing statistically significant about drops in a
    sample that small for one year. Which should be apparent in the next
    para discussing the 6 deaths this year. Obviously 2006 is twice as
    dangerous as 2005. But so long as I ride half as much I'll be ok, or
    maybe I should ride twice as fast. Aaaaggh, must be time to go for a ride.

    DaveB
     
  4. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Geez, you should be a fly on the wall at the moment, ie: the WoJ yahoogroup is seriously going off taking one Mr Scruby to task.. :D
     
  5. LotteBum

    LotteBum New Member

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    I've always found quite the opposite and it seems to be getting worse and worse every day. When I was commuting to work, I saw recreational commuters running red lights every day, yet rarely lycra-clads. I'm sure everyone here knows it, but nothing makes me seethe more.

    Lotte
     
  6. In aus.bicycle on Thu, 13 Jul 2006 21:19:41 +1000
    LotteBum <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Zebee Johnstone Wrote:
    >> Used to be I'd see mainly lycra types on fancy race bikes running reds,
    >> now it's more varied.

    > I've always found quite the opposite and it seems to be getting worse
    > and worse every day. When I was commuting to work, I saw recreational
    > commuters running red lights every day, yet rarely lycra-clads. I'm
    > sure everyone here knows it, but nothing makes me seethe more.


    Without counting, it's hard to know how much is type and how much is
    exposure.

    That is... is a particular type more likely or do all types have a
    percentage who do it, but commuters see more commuters?

    When I was commuting along an area that was more racing types than
    commuters, it was racing types I saw who ran lights. Now I see more
    mtb-and-sweatshirt-and-maybe-knicks types, those are the ones I see
    running the lights.

    But it's all grades of kit that do it. from the squishy knobby tyred
    MTB with the helmetless 20 something probably temporarily licenceless
    to the high end flatbar narrow tyred roadbike with the several lights,
    rider in long knicks, gloves, and jersey. Like I say, I'm usually the
    only one who stops for lights. If the coast looks clear, the others
    go for it.

    Zebee
     
  7. Donga

    Donga Guest

    cfsmtb wrote:

    > Keeping cyclists and pedestrians honest
    > http://www.abc.net.au/brisbane/stories/s1684746.htm?brisbane
    > Wednesday, 12 July 2006. Reporter: Phil Smith
    >
    > Presenter: Kelly Higgins-Devine photo of Bike stops at stop sign
    > A rider observes a stop sign on Coronation Drive


    Nice of Aunty to write it up that way. My guess is the only "observe"
    there was a quick glance at the sign. It's just outside the ABC studios
    at Toowong (you know, breast cancer Central). NO ONE stops at the sign.
    If council reviewed the situation with police, they might conclude it
    would be better to put in a Zebra and require motorists to stop there
    for peds and bikes.

    Donga
     
  8. Donga

    Donga Guest

    cfsmtb wrote:
    > Geez, you should be a fly on the wall at the moment, ie: the WoJ
    > yahoogroup is seriously going off taking one Mr Scruby to task.. :D


    As a matter of interest, how does someone get to be President of the
    pedestrians? Weird. And how does said council consult with its
    constituents?

    Donga
     
  9. Glen F

    Glen F Guest

    > Nice of Aunty to write it up that way. My guess is the only "observe"
    > there was a quick glance at the sign. It's just outside the ABC studios
    > at Toowong (you know, breast cancer Central). NO ONE stops at the sign.


    Yep. Sign is right opposite here. I have never seen a rider stop at
    it. Ever.
     
  10. Glen F

    Glen F Guest

    > Riding on footpaths is common, usually because riding on the road is
    > seen as more dangerous. The biggie on my ride is Pyrmont Bridge Rd.


    But the title says {BNE}, where, of course, footpath riding is legal
    (except when otherwise signed). Also in Canberra and Tas, I think?
     
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