Boardman Cyclocross Bike - Changing wheels

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by a-spence7, Jul 23, 2012.

  1. a-spence7

    a-spence7 New Member

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    Hi guys,

    I'm looking for a little advice on a purchase I'm looking at. I'm going to start a cycling again, I had previousl just done mountain biking, but I'm now looking at getting to a spot of road cycling. The problem being I would still like to be able to go down the odd tow path, or off-road trak.

    I had a look at the Boardman Team CX Cyclocross Bike 2011/2012 which seems ideal for my needs, but was thinking is it possible to buy this for my more off-road style riding, and then get some road bike skinny tyres and fit them if I ever choose to go on any long rides?

    If anyone can shed some light it would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    You can ALWAYS use a narrower tyre in a frame which can accommodate a "fat" tyre ...

    • you MAY need a second wheelset with narrower rims (e.g., 622-15) if you want significantly smaller tyres ... BUT that shouldn't be a deal breaker since being able to simply make a fast wheelset swap when you wanted to ride on alternate surfaces makes more sense than refitting different tyres on the same wheelset each time you want to ride

    If you know the largest tyre size you want to use, then THAT should probably dictate the bike you choose because you will want a frame which can accommodate the particular tyre size ...

    So, EVERYTHING ultimately depends on how far "off road" you are planning on going ...

    By MY reckoning, the maximum tyre size for a CX FORK may be 700x48 (depending on the "nubs" ... based on my KELLY CX fork NOT being able to accommodate a 700x52 tyre because of the nubs) ... a CX frame may not be able to handle anything larger than a 700x42 tyre, if that ...

    • so, YOU have to decide if a 700x42 tyre is large enough (700x42 will be more than large enough for tow-paths UNLESS you intend to thrash your way through every pot hole)
    • if you think that you will want to use a FATTER tyre for off road riding (700x52 == 29x2.1) then a CX frame-and-fork will NOT work for you

    YOU can certainly mount skinny tyres in a 29er frame ...

    • 29ers are available with RIGID forks
    • a 29er can accommodate a 700x58 tyre
     
  3. a-spence7

    a-spence7 New Member

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    I wouldn't want to go any fatter than the tyres that it comes with I wouldn't have thought. It will literally be tow paths and dirt tracks, which are pretty flat anyway.

    My concern really is being able to swap in a skinnier tyre, and rim, for when I'm out on the road, and have those work with the disk brakes that the frame has.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    With the fore mentioned caveat that FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE you may want to pony up for a second wheelset for the different types of surfaces which you plan to ride on, I don't see any reason why any CX frame wouldn't work for the type of riding which you anticipate ...

    The ¿only? reason NOT to put skinny tyres on a CX bike that 'I' can think of would be if you have an issue with the cosmetics ...

    So, here is a bike frame which was designed for 27x1.25 tyres + fenders ... 27x1.25 tyres have the same circumference as 700x32 tyres ... discounting an additional ~1/2" which the pictured Raleigh frame has to accommodate fenders, your CX bike will still have a larger gap between the typical Road tyres the frame's rear seat stay bridge & the fork's shoulder than one would find on a contemporary Road bike ...

    [​IMG]

    If the cosmetics are a problem, then ...
     
  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    BTW. For your further reference, here is a 90s vintage "sports touring" frame (aka "Hybrid" in modern parlance) which can accommodate 700x52 tyres which is pictured (below) with skinny Road tires ...


    [​IMG]
     
  6. a-spence7

    a-spence7 New Member

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    I'm not too bothered about the cosmetics of putting skinny tyres on a Cyclocorss, the issue is really if they would fit, and would I be able to get skinny rims to accomodate the disk brakes that the bike has.
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Presuming that the Boardman has a 135mm rear dropout spacing, you may be able to use a set of 29er wheels as your second set. Of course, the rim width on 29er wheelsets will vary ... probably, the narrowest is a 622-17 ...

    Who knows? The Boadman's rims may be 622-15, so it may be a matter of possibly opting for a slightly wider rim for your CX tyres.

    BTW. If the wheelset which you want isn't readily available, then you can have the set of Road rims of your preference laced to a set of MTB hubs ... I currently have a set of 622-13 rims laced to some disc hubs (I'm going to have to rethink that & will probably relace those hubs with different rims) ...

    • YOU just have to decide if you want to use Centerlock or ISO 6-bolt hubs & rotors ...
    • Centerlock hubs & rotors are lighter (at least, they seem lighter to me) unless you pony up for a wheelset with DT SWISS hubs ... and, DT SWISS hubs are (or, were at one time) available with either Centerlock or ISO 6-bolt disc mounts
    • ISO-to-Centerlock adpaters are available which will allow you to use 6-bolt rotors on Centerlock hubs
    • I would describe Centerlock hubs as being mechanic-friendly since there is just the single lockring to tighten-or-remove BUT you need a larger "tool" than a simple Allen or Torx Wrench
    • ISO rotors are generically available, so they can cost considerably less than a Centerlock rotor
    • et cetera
     
  8. a-spence7

    a-spence7 New Member

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    Being a total newbie, I'm not really sure what most of that last reply meant :)

    Another option I guess would be to just buy some skinnier tyres and put them on the rims that come with the bike. I know it would mean a lot of messing about but would be cheaper in the short term. Maybe put some 28c or 25c on the rims
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Right ...

    No need to buy a second set of wheels unless-and-until you may feel a need ... and, even then, wait a bit longer because you may yet change your mind!

    • 700x28 tyres should work on the rims which come on the bike without any issues & you may be able to use the same inner tubes ...
    • 700x25 tyres may-or-may-not require smaller inner tubes
     
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