Boardman SLR/9.2S Di2 or custom build

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Cube1959, Mar 10, 2014.

  1. Cube1959

    Cube1959 New Member

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    Hi Guys im looking at getting a Di2 , i have a 4k budget .. I have looked at loads , i am wanting it for lands end to john o groats in 2015 .. I have a chance of New Boardman SLR/9.2S Di2 for £2.459 .. That is 30% of .. leaving me with 1.5 k to maybe put some better wheels / seat on it etc .. i could sell the wheels and make the 1.5 k a tad more .. Or i could go the route of a custom build .. can i have some opinions please Cheers Rog
     
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  2. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Lands End to John o' Groats...

    ... how long with a Di2 battery last?

    Out of curiosity, what do you have now?
     
  3. Cube1959

    Cube1959 New Member

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    Hi m8

    cheers for the reply , the batts are good for some distance , but the people i will go with have all stuff taken care of ,so you can charge kit , i would invest in a second battery , ( Just in case ) .

    I have a cube Agree gtc SL ..

    I want to Di2 because i suffer from Coilits and a side affect of my illness is swollen joints , so the Di2 might help me a bit ..

    Rog
     
  4. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    I honestly can't see how Di2 is going to help you that much over a traditional setup as long as your levers are in the right place to allow easy shifting. For the most part the roads ain't too back until you get past Wick and the coastal hills and the wind make life tough. If you do want a different bike, go with an aero road frame. Boardman makes some nice ones too. Things like clothing, helmet and mitts make a big difference for much less money. The latest generation of aero road helmets really do offer and advantage. Clip on aero bars were originally developed in the longest bike race - RAAM, not by LeMond in the Tour. They were designed for long rides - cheap money, huge gains. They're by far the best bang for the buck and can provide bigger gains that a fancy set of wheels that cost a few thousand. If you have a grand to spend the best thing you could do with it is buy a power meter. You'll be able to accurately monitor your training and just as importantly as working on going faster you'll be able to very accurately monitor how much training load ( ie stress) you're putting on yourself. I'm not too well up on colitis but I can't imagine doing too much training and getting too tired mid- ride is a good thing. The powermeter can be used as a device for testing aero drag - then it's a case of free speed. Who doesn't want that? I've used a powermeter in some really long rides - some at altitude (where you can estimate power loss and recalculate threshold due to being at 10,000ft for example) and in 600km rides. You learn that keeping the power down but at a "nice pace" means you don't lose much speed but you stay fresh enough to finish is a fairly descent shape. Any time you spend 12+hours in one to on a bike "descent shape" becomes a figurative thing - the difference is your speed stays up there rather than sloping downwards and extending the ride by an hour or three. Even on the short steepish hills that are only a minute long - watch the powermeter, gear down and dance up at your required power, rather than the usual way which is think you're taking it easy but do a bit over threshold for a minute which seems easy but do that 60 times during a long ride and you've got an hour of threshold in some dead legs. Data is a wonderful, wonderful thing... Pair a powermeter up with something like a garmin edge 810 and you have power, navigation and all the usual bike computer functions. I love it for long rides. Great for exploring new roads too - do the map on garmin connect (view with street view to look at road conditions) and send the route to the bike computer. Even when you don't have the map on screen, it'll remind you when a turn is coming up. You can even get it to tell you how long you have left to ride...
     
  5. Cube1959

    Cube1959 New Member

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    Cheers for the reply , every bike shop i have asked has said the Aero type bike is no good for this type of ride .. I will look at the power meter , if you have a link that would be great , many thanks for all the advice , it is tough with colitis , as it saps my
    Hi m8

    cheers for all this info , i would love the Aero type bike , but not sure it would be suited to the lands end ride , Im 54 but in ok shape and getting better with my training , rides , gym and turbo every week , The colitis does sap my energy , im hoping in the time i have left before the ride the hospital can do a bit more for me , Darren Fletcher the Man Utd player was out of the game for 2 years ..

    Could you post some link about the power meter , i have a garmin 800 edge .. What bikes would you rec with a 4k budget

    regards

    Rog
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Quote:Originally Posted by Cube1959 .Hi Guys im looking at getting a Di2 , i have a 4k budget .. I have looked at loads , i am wanting it for lands end to john o groats in 2015 .. I have a chance of New Boardman SLR/9.2S Di2 for £2.459 .. That is 30% of .. leaving me with 1.5 k to maybe put some better wheels / seat on it etc .. i could sell the wheels and make the 1.5 k a tad more .. Or i could go the route of a custom build .. can i have some opinions please Cheers Rog

    Do you mean the alternative option you are considering is to buy an off-the-peg frame & pick-and-choose your components OR is the option to have a custom frame built + the component group of your choice?
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    BTW. If you feel compelled to outfitting your bike with electronic shifters/derailleurs then you may want to consider an electronic Campagnolo ATHENA group + the frame of your choice ...

    My recollection is that the initial reports on the Di2 shifters is that they have (comparatively/subjectively) poor tactile feedback ... and, that they can subsequently be difficult to use with full finger gloves.

    BUT, opt for an 11-speed Shimano compatible wheel + Shimano/-compatible 11-speed Cassette -- the Cassettes are probably less expensive (a good thing!) + they are available with a wider Hi-Lo range.
     
  8. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    Swampy was talking about clip on aerobars, not a full on TT/TRI bike setup. You can get a decent set of aluminum clip-ons for around $50. When set up correctly, you get a huge aero advantage for long solo stretches. Clip-ons also offer an additional riding position which takes some weight off your seat and back.

    Riding in using aerobars takes some practice as your handling changes with more weight over the front wheel and you have less immediate access to the brake/shifter. Thery are a no-no when riding in a pack.
     
  9. Cube1959

    Cube1959 New Member

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    Do you mean the alternative option you are considering is to buy an off-the-peg frame & pick-and-choose your components OR is the option to have a custom frame built + the component group of your choice?


    Do you mean the alternative option you are considering is to buy an off-the-peg frame & pick-and-choose your components OR is the option to have a custom frame built + the component group of your choice?

    Do you mean the alternative option you are considering is to buy an off-the-peg frame & pick-and-choose your components OR is the option to have a custom frame built + the component group of your choice?
    Hi

    yes get something like a Kinesis, Abyss or Vivelo frameset and chose the components ..
     
  10. Cube1959

    Cube1959 New Member

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    Not sure why the last reply stuck all the quotes in , laptop just went mad lol
     
  11. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Again, consider Campagnolo's electronic components for the fore mentioned reason (i.e., tactile feedback)...

    Decide if you will ever be wearing full finger gloves (I would think that you might) ...

    Try to read up on the pluses-and-minuses of the two electronic systems ...
     
  12. Cube1959

    Cube1959 New Member

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    Hi

    i have been reading for days now .. lol , more confused than ever , only wear full finger gloves in the winter , and i would use my other bike then , so that isn't an issue .. At least one thing is
    sorted ..
     
  13. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Most bike stores are notoriously bad for good information. My local bike shop tell me that leading research shows that 25mm tires are faster but they forget to mention that this is on the newer 25 to 27mm rims - with a standard 19mm it'd be an aero windsock. HED actually say that 22mm Conti tires are fastest on their Jet + rims that are 25mm wide. I'm sure there are some well informed bike shops out there but sadly I haven't found one yet. You seem to have a nice bike already so personally I wouldn't go after another bike just because of any exceedingly small advantage that Di2 might offer. One thing that I've been interested in is the remote Di2 shifters and the thought of putting a set on the bar tops for really long climbs. Aerodynamics is always a factor, more so that weight. The minimal weight increase in a modern frame is massively offset by aero advantages unless you just happen to live in an area that has big climbs (many miles) at 8+%. England doesn't have climbs like that. Clip on aero bars and an helmet like the Specialized Evade would offer more advantage at a way lower cost. Any ANT+ powermeter would work with your Edge 800. I have a PowerTap but the Quarq based cranks seem to be good. I'm not too well up on SRM but they are the "gold standard" Regular poster Alex Simmons has a really informative blog that probably has some good info on different powermeters. He's a wealth of knowledge and a good lad. http://alex-cycle.blogspot.com/?m=1 That's the mobile site, remove the bit on the end for the regular. Another regular on here, feltrider, has a garmin edge 800 with a couple of different powermeters. He has a blog with some good stuff on it. The type of powermeter basically comes down to personal preference. If you have more than one bike then a PowerTap equiped wheel may be the way to go. It's easy to swap the wheels between bikes. If you just have one bike then a crank based system would allow you to use different wheel sets for training and racing... Something like a PowerTap in a HED Jet 6+ with stallion build if you're over 170lbs would make a great training and racing wheel. The extra few spokes will give a minimal increase in aero drag but will offer some extra strength as well as being better able to handle spoke breakage. More spokes mean that the wheel doesn't distort as much if a spoke does break. With it being on the back of the bike I wouldn't worry too much. They normally say that the stallion build is for riders in the 200lb or heavier range but the few extra spokes will be worth it on long rides where equipment failure is not an option. I'd opt for something like a Hed 6 over a Zipp or enve wheel just because of the aluminum braking surface. Rural roads, rain, farmer Giles dragging his muck spreader, rain and carbon rims - screw that combination for a game of soldiers... That combo is bad enough on regular rims let alone carbon.
     
  14. Cube1959

    Cube1959 New Member

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    Brill info again m8 , the bike i have is a great bike , and has the super light frame on it after it went back twice for cracks , need to update my avatar photo , 2 frames and i would still get another cube , just i want a second bike , and if im getting one want something a little better and different if poss , but one that will get me to lands end and back LOL .. I am lucky to have a nice enough buget to get a decent bike , but don't want to feel it was money wasted , and find i am still out on my Cube ..

    Im still looking , but i have read some good things on the Boardman , but then there are a few others to consider , Just the boardman is at a price i can afford to pimp my ride a little , the others would stay as brought ..
     
  15. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    HMmmmm ....

    Well, it sounds as if you will be very disappointed with yourself if you don't buy the Boardman ....

    So, if you can get a 15+ minute test ride with the Di2 to see if you can live with the feel (or, lack of!!!) of the shift buttons, then you may as well pony up for it sooner rather than later ...

    1. if you decide before-or-after the ride that the Di2 isn't right for you, you can always resell it on eBay ....
    2. regardless, AFTER the ride (or, sooner), report back how well the shifters performed relative to your pre-purchase expectations ...
    • better?
    • as expected?
    • worse?

    BTW. Does the particular Boardman have a 10-speed or an 11-speed drivetrain?

    Just realize that as odd-ball as 11-speeds are at the moment, a 10-speed Di2 is obsolete as far as Shimano and/or future buyers to whom you may re-sell the electronic components in the future are concerend .

    BTW2. Does the particular Boardman have the new, asymmetric, 4-arm crank or an FSA-or-another crankset?

    Presumably, the brake calipers are appropriate Ultegra brakes -- if not then evaluate, accordingly ...
     
  16. Cube1959

    Cube1959 New Member

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    Lol , i wish i knew what to do , still reading bits on the net , every bike i read about has some problem , yet shops talk like they are selling the dogs b**locks .. What none have done is said they can provide me with a bike as good as the Boardman for £2449 .. they all come back with , well for your budget of 4k we can give you this one discounted to 3.5 k .. Meaning it's the price the boardman was .. But a bike at 3.5k will stay as it was brought .. As i say i could put another 1.6k into the boardman if i wanted .. Now off to get some answers to your very valid questions ... I will report back when i know some more .. LOL .. Cheers for the input , much apreciated .. Rog
     
  17. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    As a general rule, complete bikes are normally way cheaper than the individual components bought separately. Financially, it makes more sense to buy the bike with most of the parts that you want on it already installed. If you're looking for another bike "just because" then I'd take a look at a Cannondale EVO. I have the slightly older Cannondale HiMod and it's an awesome bike. Confidence inspiring beyond belief and despite having tree trunk sized tubes that seemingly transmit every ounce of power you put into the bike, it rides very smoothly indeed. The EVO is said to be even better... I have never ridden a Boardman bike - I have ridden a road version of the Lotus Bike though similar to the one that Boardman smashed everyone enroute to the fastest Tour prologue in history... :) That said, you already have a really nice road bike that's more than capable of doing Lands end to John o Groats. Especially with you having to live with colitis, I'd look at ways to make your cycling more productive and possibly less stressful. It's bad enough without wonky guts to go too hard and end up smashed out your brains after a hard day - and apart from the odd race many years ago where I hard to race with dodgy guts, I can't imagine doing that all the time. Just for that reason alone I'd opt for the powermeter - it allows you to be frugal yet effective with your efforts when riding. But I guess I've said that already... :p Alf, why are you prattling on about "feel" for Di2 - it's electronic, all you feel is a slight click. Click, change... Pretty straight forward. There's always the other benefit of a narrower brake lever body that feels like an old school pre-brifter.
     
  18. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Wow, alfeng is talking about obsolescence. I must be in an alternate universe.

    Cube, you sound sold on Di2 and the Boardman. I've heard Boardman frames are first rate (definitely a step or two up from Cube) and it sounds like Di2 is what floats your boat. Unless you have a specific frame in mind for the custom build (and at this price there aren't too many), I'd say pee or get off the pot. Don't overthink this.
     
  19. Cube1959

    Cube1959 New Member

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    Cheers again guys , great advice and input , I guess what is holding me back at the moment is a local shop , she used to race bikes , so you would think they know what they are talking about , But they also sell bikes , and it's a tough market .. They stock certain makes so will push them cause at the end of the day it's there wages . They also said no one stocks boardman elite , But some of the bikes they have shown me i jave never heard of and don't like the look , also they all start at just below bI know i am over thinking it , B. This guy at Boardman has been really helpful .. This is his latest reply
    Cheers again guys , great advice and input , I guess what is holding me back at the moment is a local shop , she used to race bikes , so you would think they know what they are talking about , But they also sell bikes , and it's a tough market .. They stock certain makes so will push them cause at the end of the day it's there wages . They also said no one stocks boardman elite , So then you start thinking and thinking , They said don't buy a bike without sitting on it , i brought my cube that way and it's been fine . I am not going for an Olympic gold here .. I know i am over thinking it , This guy at Boardman has been really helpful .. This is his latest reply Roger
    We don't bike fit people at our Office. This is why we have been very particular to partner with exceptional dealers whom have fitting systems in place & qualified fitters. I've made a comparison against your given body dimensions & have stated that I feel a Small would be an acceptable starting point. If you felt you needed to be specific to the measurements as I feel you seem to be leaning to, then I would advise you to visit a reputable store that have fitting in place. They would be in a far better position to offer exact frame selection based on your biomechanics, flexibility, type of riding, etc. & what could be altered to suit these particulars.

    I had a 3hr fit on my Boardman by one of our leading bike fitting stores & I had more changed than just a stem...

    As to the quality of our carbon & an insight into our process of R&D please feel free to browse these links:

    http://boardmanbikes.com/boardman/boardman_technology.html
    http://boardmanbikes.com/boardman/boardman_B56.html
    http://boardmanbikes.com/boardman/boardman_materials.html

    They give an insight as to why we feel our frames stand out in a mass carbon crowd. From this & what I see daily, the knowledge & involvement that goes into the development by Chris & the select team of engineers in the UK that Chris has worked with exclusively prior & during his time with British Cycling, I am assured that we are FAST becoming a brand with a higher level of credibility above many others.

    Any Magazine Tests that feature our bikes, twice Brand of the year 220 Triathlon Magazine, Brownlee Brothers ITU Triathletes & Olympic Gold Medallist, Pete Jacobs (World Champion Ironman Kona 2012)...surely we are doing something right?

    We are 2.5 years old as an Elite Series Brand. We have been very particular who we have chosen to partner with in ensuring that the brand sits well with the stores whom have signed up to stocking us & that they can represent us by delivering the knowledge to the customers who fall into the category of high end Road & Tri purchasers.

    This range is not in any way connected to Halfords as they exclusively stock our performance range & we make a clear disassociation with them for the Elite Series.

    Feel free to come back to me, but I sense you need more knowledge on sizing yourself to our frameset. If you view the Buy tab you should find a dealer within distance that would be able to offer you the support of the detailed technicalities regarding this.

    You mentioned you had a higher budget & although I never mentioned this at the outset, you could also look at our SLS Range. Derived from the SLR Frame but built with more comfort in mind. Higher front end, curved, pencil seatstays giving you a slight comfort advantage over the SLR. In DI2 spec this would come in at £3200.

    But just in case you were wondering if we're marketing this exclusively at the Sportive Market as an endurance frameset, I can also state we have a Continental French Professional road team racing these very frames. Some of the riders have moved from teams whom feature in all of the highest races in Europe, TDF, Giro, Classics etc.

    http://boardmanbikes.com/road/sls94_Di2.html

    Regards
    Andy
     
  20. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Too true!

    HMMMmmm ...

    YOU could be right that my concerns about tactile feedback which the Di2 shifters have-or-don't-have are unwarranted ...

    Actually, you ARE right!

    Unfortunately, my inclusion of second hand information IS indeed fretting over something which 'I' cannot directly testify to ...

    So, whether or not some of us may be manually clumsier than others when fatigued is possibly only a concern for the few of us rather than a concern for the many ...

    It's the "Once bitten, twice shy" problem that 'I' have with Shimano's mechanical shifters which makes me wary of their engineer's sense of what is-and-isn't good ergonomicst, so my spidey senses where apparently overly active ...

    Remember, 'I' am the princess-and-the-pea who was occasionally confounded by what 'I' feel is the (unnecessary) "dwell" designed into Shimano's shifters ...

    I just have to believe that there have-been-and-are never-to-be-seen-by-the-public prototype versions of their STI Road shifters which have concentric take-up spools!

    So, chalk it up to my (possibly?) amplifying the minute ...

    And so, whether or not there is a lack of "feel" OR other possible concerns cited by others who initially reviewed the shifters could-and-should indeed be described as "prattling."
    And so, my apologies for the "prattling on."

    Nonetheless (because I apparently keep my components forever -- heck, I am still working on indexing a Nuovo Record rear derailleur to some Ergo shifters ... one tentative ""combination" seems to work, but ...), if you will allow me, I guess THAT raises the question as to how many times the buttons/("switches") can be.activated before they fail?

    2mm (?) of movement for the buttons does seem like a lot, but then again, not really that much ...

    Keyboard switches fail.

    Even touch pads fail.

    Is it implausible to think that contacts OR the 2mm of travel on the Di2 buttons won't degrade over time?

    Can the switches in a Di2 shifter be replaced or is the shifter kaput if here is an out-of-warranty failure?

    Do Shimano's Di2 individual components become paperweights like their mechanical counterparts upon failure?

    What then, is the theoretical life expectancy of a Di2 component under normal conditions?

    And, under adverse conditions?

    Can THOSE (the underlying switches) be real concerns about the Di2 buttons/paddles for the non-sponsored rider who are not concerned about their dexterity when they are fatigued?

    Yes, those are a lot of concerns for someone who is unlikely to buy a Di2 drivetrain because 'I' am less convinced that there is an advantage over what I am currently using than Shimano-and-SRAM users might be convinced that there is any possible advantage to using Campagnolo's mechanical shifters with-or-without Shimano derailleurs!

    And so, while the supposed lack of any significant tactile feedback is NOT necessarily a big deal it seemed to be worth being aware of & therefore worth noting ...

    OKAY. With THAT out of the way, let me say that once one gets beyond the utility of various components, the cosmetics and/or ergonomics CAN matter ...

    And, I can envision that there are some infidels who do not like the appearance of Campagnolo's components ...

    NOT all of the components coming out of Vicenza look good.

    But, even if all other things were equal, 'I' would rather have the Campagnolo's electronic thumb lever rather than the Di2's button.
     
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