Bobby Julich calls 'em out

Discussion in 'Professional Cycling' started by homeycheese, Apr 21, 2005.

  1. homeycheese

    homeycheese New Member

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    Anybody notice this interview with Julich?
    "Everybody doesn't realize how hard it is to live in Europe eight months out of the year," said Julich, who is leading Denmark-based Team CSC in this race and won a bronze medal in the time trial at last year's Olympics. "Let (European riders) come over here eight months a year and see how their wives deal with it and their dogs deal with it and their kids deal with it. See how tough they are." :p
     
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  2. babylou

    babylou New Member

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    It's never enjoyable to work away from a good family.
     
  3. Roadrash Dunc

    Roadrash Dunc New Member

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    I guess it comes as a shock to some Americans when the world doesnt revolve around them.Shame that. :rolleyes:
     
  4. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

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    Easy Trigger... I think it is true that if you are non-European (Australian, African, South American, North American, etc.) it is a little harder on the personal life to live, train, and race in Europe... DUH. I don't think there is anything UScentric about that fact and that the playing field isn't quite level in this respect. I am sure if there are any Europeans playing professional American football (not likely), Basketball (possible), or baseball in the US they would have the same disadantages... but there is nothing egocentric about pointing that out.
     
  5. muhko

    muhko New Member

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    I do not disagree in what you are saying - just a tiny bit offended by the "not likely" ;-) ... Well, ever heard of Morten Andersen? He is Danish (Denmark is very much part of Europe!) - and he has been playing in the NFL since 1982: http://www.nfl.com/players/playerpage/1376 + http://www.vikings.com/player_detail_objectname_morten_andersen.html
     
  6. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

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    Well to be fair, I only meant "not likely" because I know some Europeans play basketball and baseball, but thought no one played American Football outside the US and Canada... and even so, he went to college in the US and has lived there for almost 30 years. He is a Danish born American for all intents and purposes. That is totally different than what Julich was talking about: working in a continent other than where you live with your house, friends, family, dog, etc.

    That said perhaps there are some Danes that live in Denmark for 8 months a year that only come back to the US to play football, and I will change it from "not likely" to "very rare exception", but I maintain my arguement that they are certainly at a disadvantage to native players because of life outside the game (just as non-europeans are at a slight disadvantage when racing in Europe).
     
  7. JohnO

    JohnO New Member

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    Xenophobia aside, Bobby's statement would more accurately reflect his sentiments if he said - how hard it is to live in a foreign country eight months out of the year. It's not a slight on Europe, it's just a comment on leaving your native land for long periods of time. Most anyone who does this feels the same way.

    We get a lot of imports in our national sports here in the US. A lot in pro basketball, with a substantal number from Africa, some from the former Soviet nations, and let's not forget the towering Yao Ming. Baseball gets quite a few players from Central America, plus one or two from Japan. Some in auto racing - it has been a while since a US driver has won our flagship Indy 500.
     
  8. djrocker257

    djrocker257 New Member

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    Of course it is hard, just ask any servicemember who is deployed overseas.

    Doug
     
  9. TiMan

    TiMan New Member

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    Within 10 years the euro's will be coming over...the USA will be taking over the sport of cycling I think. The number of riders has grown like wild fire in this country due to the success of Armstrong....so I do like him for something I guess he he he.
     
  10. Roadrash Dunc

    Roadrash Dunc New Member

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    I just find Julich a bit of a tart who likes to whinge.I dont hear the Aussys complaining and they have alot further to travel.At least Julich can fly home for the weekend.
    My remark on the ego-centricity of Americans wasnt far from the truth though , take Ti-Mans response for example : so America is going to be the centre of pro bike racing and take over the sport is it?
    Come on...
    Its a European sport and will stay that way.Armstrongs taken it through the roof in America but we all know unless another Tour winner comes along from the USA or someone who can win 3 Spring classics in a season and generate publicy for the 1 day events , the interest will fizzle out over there.
    Armstrong even said it himself , Yanks wont travel to the Tour unless theres an American with a shot at winning.
    No doubt the next generation will have some promising cyclists from North America , but theres currently no one remotely near Armstrong to take over that mantle.
     
  11. Tubbs

    Tubbs New Member

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    Bobby... that's not fair man! Of course living and working far from home is tough. And yes Europeans have come over here and have made a good go at it. Just look at the NHL. It's full of Europeans. The captain of my beloved Maple Leafs is none other than Mats Sundin.

    I must point out though that generally the challenge is a language barrier. Most Europeans that come here already know how to speak English. When they want to come to North America, they only have to learn 1 other language which they may have learned in their home country already. When a Canadian or American wants to go to Europe how do you decide whether or not to learn French, German, Swedish, Russian, Italian, Dutch, Spanish... etc... etc... It's tough when you grow up speaking only one language. It's not uncommon for Europeans to speak several languages. Kudo's to them.
     
  12. Ashley3

    Ashley3 New Member

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    Geez, TiMan,
    Don't we have to take over the sport of soccer first? Been making great strides there, eh? Soccer was my first love and cycling is my second. Because of that I hope my native country -- the USA -- will develop athletes to make us competitive with anyone in the world. And, in large part because it would be nice to have the best soccer/cycling to watch from my front porch, I'll be delighted if both come our way (Chelsea just played a tour!), but I sure don't hope or expect we'll be "taking over" anything.
     
  13. Sun Dodger

    Sun Dodger New Member

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    I think not.

    There may be a lot more riders in the US now thanks to Amstrong - Which is great, the more the better...

    But... Cycling in Europe is still a world away in terms of Opportunity & Facilities - Here in Amsterdam I can:
    Ride my bike 40k's to work without any problems from psycho car drivers.
    Race my bike 5 times a week in the summer without having to leave the city.
    Train & Race in the winter on an indoor Velodrome.

    Even more important - in Europe, Cycling is part of the culture - kids over here start riding when the can walk and racing well before their teens. Non-cyclists tolerate road closures for even quite minor races.

    And finally - Europe has the races! The Tour, Giro, Flanders L-B-L etc are the pinacle of the sport. That isn't going to change (although the nationalities of the winners might..)
     
  14. Ruff_Ryder

    Ruff_Ryder New Member

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    Julich is using homesickness as an excuse as to why he is not as good as the top Europeans.
     
  15. Ashley3

    Ashley3 New Member

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    Couldn't agree more. He's only better than all the British and French riders, and lord knows, that's not much of an accomplishment these days. Only being the 16th best rider in Europe would make nearly anybody long to head home.
    By the way, is there a new country code designation for the UK? I don't find UK or GBR listed beside the name of anyone ranked in the top 137 riders. Have all the homesick Limeys headed home for kidney pie and warm beer?
    http://www.uci.ch/uciroot/wspage.as...rider&ranking=20050724&rdate=24.07.2005&l=eng
     
  16. Ruff_Ryder

    Ruff_Ryder New Member

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    i think you will find that Roger Hammond (UK) is probably one of the strongest domestiques in your pride and joy the Discovery Channel. he would also give Hincapie and all the other storm troopers and run for their money in the classics, especially Paris-Roubaix, if only Discovery would let him go for victory.

    we also have Bradley Wiggins, triple Olympic medallist, in the ProTour., who would MURDER any american on the track.

    and lets not forget our history now. before Lance came over and all you americans felt the patriotism rush to your head and ran to your nearest bike shop, Great Britain had some of the greatest riders of all time.
     
  17. Roadrash Dunc

    Roadrash Dunc New Member

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    Ok come on mate lets not make this a dick measuring contest between America and the UK.
    Right now they'd win it by 6 inches.
    Julich's a whiney prick but he isnt half a bad rider.
     
  18. Ashley3

    Ashley3 New Member

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    I agree on Julich. I saw an interview with him a while ago, and while he does come across as a bit whiney, he more or less confessed that he was a bit of a head case and he seemed to hint that he suffered from depression. But he is a pretty good rider and I'm happy for his success this season.
    Sorry for the Brit jab. I couldn't resist, but I should have. I really enjoy this forum, but what I like least about it is the rampant nationalism that flares up when the testosterone gets running. And, even if in jest, I ought to avoid provoking it.
    I saw Hammond in Philadelphia in June. He's a good one. And the history of British cycling isn't lost on me.
     
  19. wolfix

    wolfix New Member

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    I have a question here about the greatest riders of all time of GB. This is not an attack on GB because I feel the nationalism debate going on in here is a waste of time. And I am a collector of British built frames going back 35 years. But who are these riders of GB who are the greatest of all time ????? It seems to me the last time Gb was a force was when the Ti-Raleigh team dominated the peleton . But Peter Post hired Dutch riders to ride for the British sponsor.
    And we Americans were running to the bike stores years ago after Greg Lemond won his TDF's .
     
  20. Roadrash Dunc

    Roadrash Dunc New Member

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    Wolfi , Britain actually as a poor history on the road , our biggest star and closest thing to a GT winner tragically OD'd and died on Mt Ventoux.And Robert Millar was too eccentric and media-unfriendly to raise the profile of the sport here.
    But we do have a grand history in the velodrome , but this being the road racing forum its highly irrelevant :p

    Lets not get involved though between them and us , on the road America has a far greater calibre of cyclists past and presant than we do , thats not up for debate.Hopefully one day that will change , but cycling in Britain seems about as welcome to the media and the public as Hitler at a Barmitzvah.

    At least in America youve got guys like Lemond and Lance who transcend all sports and encourage kids to ride a bike - you also have plenty of space to ride your bike.We have neither in this country.No room and no superstars who make the sport 'cool'.
    In the UK we dont have room to fart , especially for the 1/4 of the population who all live in the tiny South East of England.

    British cycling has and always will be a niche sport that generates nothing more than a few lines in the mass media - it will only change if we produce our own Lance Armstrong.
    I bet you most people in the UK who wear yellow wristbands for example either do not know who Lance Armstrong is and what the bands are for , or what sport he represents.And i guarantee you most of them have never sat in front of the TV and watched a pro cycling race :(

    Boardman got alot of attention over his track exploits , but he basically failed on the road so Joe Public was none the wiser.Then theres David Millars positive dope test.French cycling maybe in the doldrums right now , but British road cycling has never really left them.
     
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