Boiled eggs with "gray" insides.

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by ***** charles, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. Hi all,

    First, this is a great group, got lots of suggestions from last post.
    To continue, sometimes when I peel an egg, it has a gray coating
    on the yellow inner part. I assume that this is from boiling too
    long?
    Is there a device that keeps the yoke in the center of the egg
    while boiling so that the yoke doesn't settle next to the shell before
    hardening?
    Is there a special manual manipulation technique for accomplishing
    the same result?
    Can a microwave ever be used to make boiled eggs? I have
    heard of "exploding eggs" so I thought I would ask first.

    thanks,
    charles.....
     
    Tags:


  2. Jude

    Jude Guest

    You should be able to solve the greyish / greenish insides if you run
    them under cold water immediately after you finish cooking them. I put
    ice in the pan so the chill really quickly.
     
  3. MoM

    MoM Guest

    "***** charles" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all,
    >
    > First, this is a great group, got lots of suggestions from
    > last post.
    > To continue, sometimes when I peel an egg, it has a gray
    > coating
    > on the yellow inner part. I assume that this is from
    > boiling too
    > long?
    > Is there a device that keeps the yoke in the center of the
    > egg
    > while boiling so that the yoke doesn't settle next to the
    > shell before
    > hardening?
    > Is there a special manual manipulation technique for
    > accomplishing
    > the same result?
    > Can a microwave ever be used to make boiled eggs? I have
    > heard of "exploding eggs" so I thought I would ask first.
    >
    > thanks,
    > charles.....
    >
    >

    You are cooking it too long and too hot.

    Put eggs in warm water. Bring to boil for 1 minute.

    Turn off and cover pot. Leave for 15 min.

    Drain, shake eggs in pan.

    Run cold water in the pan and peel.

    MoM
     
  4. P.Aitken

    P.Aitken Guest

    ***** charles wrote:

    > Hi all,
    >
    > First, this is a great group, got lots of suggestions from last post.
    > To continue, sometimes when I peel an egg, it has a gray coating
    > on the yellow inner part. I assume that this is from boiling too
    > long?
    > Is there a device that keeps the yoke in the center of the egg
    > while boiling so that the yoke doesn't settle next to the shell before
    > hardening?
    > Is there a special manual manipulation technique for accomplishing
    > the same result?
    > Can a microwave ever be used to make boiled eggs? I have
    > heard of "exploding eggs" so I thought I would ask first.
    >
    > thanks,
    > charles.....
    >
    >


    The gray/green ring around the yolk is usually caused by cooking too
    long, cooking at too high a temp, and/or not cooling quickly after
    cooking. This is why actually boiling egs for the entire cooking period
    is to be avoided - better to use this method:

    1) Put eggs in pan, cover with cold water by at least 1 inch.
    2) Bring just to a boil over high heat.
    3) Remove from heat and cover pan.
    4) Wait 20 minutes for large eggs.
    5) Run cold tap water over eggs til cool, 10 minutes or so.

    Peter
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    "MoM" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "***** charles" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hi all,
    > >
    > > First, this is a great group, got lots of suggestions from
    > > last post.
    > > To continue, sometimes when I peel an egg, it has a gray
    > > coating
    > > on the yellow inner part. I assume that this is from
    > > boiling too
    > > long?
    > > Is there a device that keeps the yoke in the center of the
    > > egg
    > > while boiling so that the yoke doesn't settle next to the
    > > shell before
    > > hardening?
    > > Is there a special manual manipulation technique for
    > > accomplishing
    > > the same result?
    > > Can a microwave ever be used to make boiled eggs? I have
    > > heard of "exploding eggs" so I thought I would ask first.
    > >
    > > thanks,
    > > charles.....
    > >
    > >

    > You are cooking it too long and too hot.
    >
    > Put eggs in warm water. Bring to boil for 1 minute.
    >
    > Turn off and cover pot. Leave for 15 min.
    >
    > Drain, shake eggs in pan.
    >
    > Run cold water in the pan and peel.
    >
    > MoM


    I was just wondering if you folks poke a hole in the raw egg like I do
    before cooking ?

    Bill

    --
    Garden Shade Zone 5 S Jersey USA
    This article is posted under fair use rules in accordance with
    Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, and is strictly for the educational
    and informative purposes. This material is distributed without profit.
    Vision Problems? Look at http://www.ocutech.com/ ~us$1500
     
  6. maxine in ri

    maxine in ri Guest

    William Wagner wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,


    > I was just wondering if you folks poke a hole in the raw egg like I do
    > before cooking ?
    >
    > Bill


    No. If they start in cold water with salt, they don't seem to crack as
    much. If there are too few or too many in the pot, they will rattle
    around and crack themselves against each other. Then again, sometimes
    it doesn't make a difference. Last night I had 7 in the 1 quart pot,
    and none cracked. Last time, I had 7 in the pot, and 1 cracked.

    maxine in ri
     
  7. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "***** charles" <[email protected]> wrote

    > To continue, sometimes when I peel an egg, it has a gray coating
    > on the yellow inner part. I assume that this is from boiling too
    > long?


    Yes, it's overdone. Just bring the eggs to a boil, turn off
    the heat and let sit, covered, for 20 minutes or so, some say less
    time, then put them into ice water to cool them off quickly.

    > Is there a device that keeps the yoke in the center of the egg
    > while boiling so that the yoke doesn't settle next to the shell before
    > hardening?


    Try rolling them around in the water as it's heating, just a little
    bit, that should center the yolk.

    > Can a microwave ever be used to make boiled eggs? I have
    > heard of "exploding eggs" so I thought I would ask first.


    I wouldn't go there, not a plan. (laugh) nancy
     
  8. djs0302

    djs0302 Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > "***** charles" <[email protected]> wrote


    > > Can a microwave ever be used to make boiled eggs? I have
    > > heard of "exploding eggs" so I thought I would ask first.

    >
    > I wouldn't go there, not a plan. (laugh) nancy


    I tried it one time just to see what would happen. The egg exploded
    like a firecracker.
     
  9. Nancy Young wrote on 17 Jan 2006 in rec.food.cooking

    >
    > "***** charles" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > > To continue, sometimes when I peel an egg, it has a gray coating
    > > on the yellow inner part. I assume that this is from boiling too
    > > long?

    >
    > Yes, it's overdone. Just bring the eggs to a boil, turn off
    > the heat and let sit, covered, for 20 minutes or so, some say less
    > time, then put them into ice water to cool them off quickly.
    >
    > > Is there a device that keeps the yoke in the center of the egg
    > > while boiling so that the yoke doesn't settle next to the shell

    before
    > > hardening?

    >
    > Try rolling them around in the water as it's heating, just a little
    > bit, that should center the yolk.
    >
    > > Can a microwave ever be used to make boiled eggs? I have
    > > heard of "exploding eggs" so I thought I would ask first.

    >
    > I wouldn't go there, not a plan. (laugh) nancy
    >
    >
    >


    there are devices that you put in the water to indicate when the eggs are
    at each stage of boiled from very soft to very hard. They are egg like in
    shape...some are red (at least the ones' I've seen). I saw them at a
    safeway in the gadget isle.

    --
    The eyes are the mirrors....
    But the ears...Ah the ears.
    The ears keep the hat up.
     
  10. The Bubbo

    The Bubbo Guest

    William Wagner wrote:

    >
    > I was just wondering if you folks poke a hole in the raw egg like I do
    > before cooking ?
    >
    > Bill
    >


    I have and it's worked well for me

    --
    ..:Heather:.
    www.velvet-c.com
    Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
     
  11. MoM

    MoM Guest

    "William Wagner" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message
    news:D[email protected]ews.net...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "MoM" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "***** charles" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > Hi all,
    >> >
    >> > First, this is a great group, got lots of suggestions
    >> > from
    >> > last post.
    >> > To continue, sometimes when I peel an egg, it has a
    >> > gray
    >> > coating
    >> > on the yellow inner part. I assume that this is from
    >> > boiling too
    >> > long?
    >> > Is there a device that keeps the yoke in the center of
    >> > the
    >> > egg
    >> > while boiling so that the yoke doesn't settle next to
    >> > the
    >> > shell before
    >> > hardening?
    >> > Is there a special manual manipulation technique for
    >> > accomplishing
    >> > the same result?
    >> > Can a microwave ever be used to make boiled eggs? I
    >> > have
    >> > heard of "exploding eggs" so I thought I would ask
    >> > first.
    >> >
    >> > thanks,
    >> > charles.....
    >> >
    >> >

    >> You are cooking it too long and too hot.
    >>
    >> Put eggs in warm water. Bring to boil for 1 minute.
    >>
    >> Turn off and cover pot. Leave for 15 min.
    >>
    >> Drain, shake eggs in pan.
    >>
    >> Run cold water in the pan and peel.
    >>
    >> MoM

    >
    > I was just wondering if you folks poke a hole in the raw
    > egg like I do
    > before cooking ?
    >
    > Bill
    >
    > --
    > Garden Shade Zone 5 S Jersey USA
    > This article is posted under fair use rules in accordance
    > with
    > Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, and is strictly for the
    > educational
    > and informative purposes. This material is distributed
    > without profit.
    > Vision Problems? Look at http://www.ocutech.com/ ~us$1500


    No

    MoM
     
  12. Phred

    Phred Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "maxine in ri" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >William Wagner wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>,

    >
    >> I was just wondering if you folks poke a hole in the raw egg like I do
    >> before cooking ?

    >
    >No. If they start in cold water with salt, they don't seem to crack as
    >much. If there are too few or too many in the pot, they will rattle
    >around and crack themselves against each other. Then again, sometimes
    >it doesn't make a difference. Last night I had 7 in the 1 quart pot,
    >and none cracked. Last time, I had 7 in the pot, and 1 cracked.


    Recalling days of chem prac decades ago, I've sometimes wondered if
    the "glass bead" principle would work with boiling eggs. Haven't
    actually tried (don't have any glass beads -- and I suspect the lab
    size would soon all be gone down the plug hole if I did have some :)
    but maybe I will one day -- if I ever get around to buying a pack of
    those cheap marbles from Coles Variety or wherever. They might be too
    big relative to the size of the eggs though; could just get the whole
    caboodle bouncing around!

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     
  13. On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 11:00:36 GMT, [email protected] (Phred)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >"maxine in ri" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>William Wagner wrote:
    >>> In article <[email protected]>,

    >>
    >>> I was just wondering if you folks poke a hole in the raw egg like I do
    >>> before cooking ?

    >>
    >>No. If they start in cold water with salt, they don't seem to crack as
    >>much. If there are too few or too many in the pot, they will rattle
    >>around and crack themselves against each other. Then again, sometimes
    >>it doesn't make a difference. Last night I had 7 in the 1 quart pot,
    >>and none cracked. Last time, I had 7 in the pot, and 1 cracked.

    >
    >Recalling days of chem prac decades ago, I've sometimes wondered if
    >the "glass bead" principle would work with boiling eggs. Haven't
    >actually tried (don't have any glass beads -- and I suspect the lab
    >size would soon all be gone down the plug hole if I did have some :)
    >but maybe I will one day -- if I ever get around to buying a pack of
    >those cheap marbles from Coles Variety or wherever. They might be too
    >big relative to the size of the eggs though; could just get the whole
    >caboodle bouncing around!


    Vinegar works. One tbsp of vinegar in the water.

    Nathalie in Switzerland
     
  14. Jude

    Jude Guest

    Phred wrote:
    > Recalling days of chem prac decades ago, I've sometimes wondered if
    > the "glass bead" principle would work with boiling eggs. Haven't
    > actually tried (don't have any glass beads -- and I suspect the lab
    > size would soon all be gone down the plug hole if I did have some :)
    > but maybe I will one day -- if I ever get around to buying a pack of
    > those cheap marbles from Coles Variety or wherever. They might be too
    > big relative to the size of the eggs though; could just get the whole
    > caboodle bouncing around!
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >


    Explain the glass bead principle, please.
     
  15. Nathalie Chiva <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >>In article
    >><[email protected]>, "maxine
    >>in ri" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>No. If they start in cold water with salt, they don't seem to
    >>>crack as much. If there are too few or too many in the pot, they
    >>>will rattle around and crack themselves against each other. Then
    >>>again, sometimes it doesn't make a difference. Last night I had
    >>>7 in the 1 quart pot, and none cracked. Last time, I had 7 in
    >>>the pot, and 1 cracked.

    >
    > Vinegar works. One tbsp of vinegar in the water.


    That will limit leakage but not prevent cracking. To prevent cracking,
    discolouration and what not, place the eggs in cold water, bring water
    to a boil, then take off the heat and let sit for twelve minutes
    exactly. Your hard boiled eggs will be perfect.

    If you're wary of that, turn down to barely a simmer.

    --

    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why
    the poor have no food, they call me a communist."

    Dom Helder Camara
     
  16. Phred

    Phred Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Phred wrote:
    >> Recalling days of chem prac decades ago, I've sometimes wondered if
    >> the "glass bead" principle would work with boiling eggs. Haven't
    >> actually tried (don't have any glass beads -- and I suspect the lab
    >> size would soon all be gone down the plug hole if I did have some :)
    >> but maybe I will one day -- if I ever get around to buying a pack of
    >> those cheap marbles from Coles Variety or wherever. They might be too
    >> big relative to the size of the eggs though; could just get the whole
    >> caboodle bouncing around!

    >
    >Explain the glass bead principle, please.


    We used a few glass beads in flasks/beakers when heating solutions in
    chem prac. The idea seemed to be that the bouncing beads would
    prevent the container jumping around when the liquid started to boil.
    (The beads themselves performed pretty well though. :)

    The correct type of bead will also prevent superheating -- and could
    be used in more modern times to prevent superheating of liquids in
    microwave ovens. (Though I don't know of anyone who does this. ;-)

    I was just wondering if their use would prevent eggs jumping around
    and breaking during boiling. I note that someone else has assumed
    eggs crack due to expansion of the air sac contained in them. I have
    always assumed it was due to "bouncing". Maybe it's really a
    combination of the two -- increased internal pressure combined with
    physical stress on the shell. But I admit to bias towards the latter.

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     
  17. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Phred wrote:
    >
    > Recalling days of chem prac decades ago, I've sometimes wondered if
    > the "glass bead" principle would work with boiling eggs. Haven't
    > actually tried (don't have any glass beads -- and I suspect the lab
    > size would soon all be gone down the plug hole if I did have some :)
    > but maybe I will one day -- if I ever get around to buying a pack of
    > those cheap marbles from Coles Variety or wherever. They might be too
    > big relative to the size of the eggs though; could just get the whole
    > caboodle bouncing around!
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.


    Those "glass beads" weren't just glass, they were Pyrex, and they work
    by increasing the surface area on which air bubbles can form and
    escape. There would be no advantage to using them for boiling eggs,
    sicne you should bring your eggs up to temp in the water anyway.

    The key to not cracking eggs while boiling is to start with uncracked
    eggs to begin with, and to not boil them vigorously. Cracked eggs
    crack - you may not see the cracks but you can be assured they were
    there. If you purchased your eggs from a store that sells mass-market
    eggs grown in factory farms, the egg shells will be thin and most
    likely cracked. If you are able to buy them from a farm outlet or
    local farmer, the shells will be nice and thick and not cracked. Egg
    quality is undoubtedly your problem.

    -L.


    -L.
     
  18. P.Aitken

    P.Aitken Guest

    scott123 wrote:

    > Eggs begin with a very tiny air pocket that grows over time. They crack
    > because this air pocket expands when heated. The fresher the egg, the
    > smaller the air pocket, the less tendency toward cracking. At the same
    > time, though, the fresher the egg, the harder they are to peel.
    >


    This is not completely accurate. Egg shells are permeable to air, so as
    the air exmands it passes thru the shell - this is why you see bubbles
    rising from eggs in the hot water. The main reason eggs crack while
    being boiled is that they are already cracked - small hairline cracks
    that are not visible initially. Knocking around in too-rapidly boiling
    water is another reason. Temperature shock is not involved. I remember
    seeing Julia Child take eggs from an ice water bath directly to boiling
    water with no cracking.

    Peter
     
  19. P.Aitken

    P.Aitken Guest

    Phred wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Phred wrote:
    >>
    >>>Recalling days of chem prac decades ago, I've sometimes wondered if
    >>>the "glass bead" principle would work with boiling eggs. Haven't
    >>>actually tried (don't have any glass beads -- and I suspect the lab
    >>>size would soon all be gone down the plug hole if I did have some :)
    >>>but maybe I will one day -- if I ever get around to buying a pack of
    >>>those cheap marbles from Coles Variety or wherever. They might be too
    >>>big relative to the size of the eggs though; could just get the whole
    >>>caboodle bouncing around!

    >>
    >>Explain the glass bead principle, please.

    >
    >
    > We used a few glass beads in flasks/beakers when heating solutions in
    > chem prac. The idea seemed to be that the bouncing beads would
    > prevent the container jumping around when the liquid started to boil.
    > (The beads themselves performed pretty well though. :)
    >


    This is not why the beads are used. Your next para explains the actual
    reason.

    > The correct type of bead will also prevent superheating -- and could
    > be used in more modern times to prevent superheating of liquids in
    > microwave ovens. (Though I don't know of anyone who does this. ;-)
    >


    Peter
    >
     
  20. On Thu 19 Jan 2006 06:36:07a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it P.Aitken?

    >
    >
    > scott123 wrote:
    >
    >> Eggs begin with a very tiny air pocket that grows over time. They crack
    >> because this air pocket expands when heated. The fresher the egg, the
    >> smaller the air pocket, the less tendency toward cracking. At the same
    >> time, though, the fresher the egg, the harder they are to peel.
    >>

    >
    > This is not completely accurate. Egg shells are permeable to air, so as
    > the air exmands it passes thru the shell - this is why you see bubbles
    > rising from eggs in the hot water. The main reason eggs crack while
    > being boiled is that they are already cracked - small hairline cracks
    > that are not visible initially. Knocking around in too-rapidly boiling
    > water is another reason. Temperature shock is not involved. I remember
    > seeing Julia Child take eggs from an ice water bath directly to boiling
    > water with no cracking.


    Curious... What would be the point of taking eggs from an ice water bath
    and putting them in boiling water, besides the obvious, cooking them? I
    mean, why ice beforehand?

    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
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