Bontrager Gigapower brake shoes --- horrible

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by maxo, Oct 25, 2004.

  1. maxo

    maxo Guest

    Anyone used these? They're the cartridge type, btw. Cost around 13USD for
    the set.

    My beef with them is that they get glass and stones caught in them so
    often that they're usually worthless after a couple miles until I pry the
    detritus out. I've never had a set of pads so tenacious in their grip of
    road debris.

    I'm using them on a set of vintage Shimano 600 calipers with Mavic Ma3s,
    but that should be irrelevant.

    On the back caliper I've got a set of the generic black block in metal
    holder ones--that cost a buck a pair, and honestly, they kick the
    Bontrager's butt, except for wet stopping, where they're merely adequate.
    They are silent, and never ever have picked up any debris.

    Worst pads I've ever used, bar none. Should I mail them back to Bontrager
    with a note of complaint? Thirteen bucks isn't the kings ransom, but
    should be plenty for a set of trouble free brake shoes.

    I'm tempted to just get a new set of those Nashbar long reach
    calipers--for a tenner more than two new sets of brake shoes, I can take
    the chance on totally fresh brakes. :D Do you all think the braking of the
    dual pivot brakes is much superior to that of traditional sidepulls, and
    worth the upgrade?
     
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  2. maxo wrote:
    > Anyone used these? They're the cartridge type, btw. Cost around 13USD

    for
    > the set.
    >
    > My beef with them is that they get glass and stones caught in them so
    > often that they're usually worthless after a couple miles until I pry

    the
    > detritus out. I've never had a set of pads so tenacious in their grip

    of
    > road debris.
    >
    > I'm using them on a set of vintage Shimano 600 calipers with Mavic

    Ma3s,
    > but that should be irrelevant.
    >
    > On the back caliper I've got a set of the generic black block in

    metal
    > holder ones--that cost a buck a pair, and honestly, they kick the
    > Bontrager's butt, except for wet stopping, where they're merely

    adequate.
    > They are silent, and never ever have picked up any debris.
    >
    > Worst pads I've ever used, bar none. Should I mail them back to

    Bontrager
    > with a note of complaint? Thirteen bucks isn't the kings ransom, but
    > should be plenty for a set of trouble free brake shoes.
    >
    > I'm tempted to just get a new set of those Nashbar long reach
    > calipers--for a tenner more than two new sets of brake shoes, I can

    take
    > the chance on totally fresh brakes. :D Do you all think the braking

    of the
    > dual pivot brakes is much superior to that of traditional sidepulls,

    and
    > worth the upgrade?


    You want better braking? Change your pads to Kool Stop salmon colored
    ones:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/brakeshoes.html

    Sheldon sells them and there's one for every type of application, nuff
    said....
     
  3. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 10:55:25 -0700, bfd853 wrote:

    >
    > You want better braking? Change your pads to Kool Stop salmon colored
    > ones:
    >
    > http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/brakeshoes.html


    That doesn't really help or answer my query, whether or not anyone has had
    this problem with debris or not. When they're not embedded with crap--they
    stop brilliantly in the wet--as good as KS pads.

    Yes, the Koolstops are fine, yes I've used them before, no the local LBS
    sucks and doesn't stock them, and FWIW el cheapo atb shoes from *mart work
    as well as I need them to, but the shape interferes with the brake quick
    release and fender.

    The local LBS wants $20 for the salmon *refills*, but as I said, they
    don't even stock the standalone pads.

    Honestly, Nashbar's got those long reach calipers on sale for as much as a
    set of pads from the LBS--I might just take my chances...

    I'm really curious more to as whether pad compound or design contributes
    in some way to the pads attracting grit.

    :D
     
  4. maxo wrote:
    > Honestly, Nashbar's got those long reach calipers on sale for as much

    as a
    > set of pads from the LBS--I might just take my chances...
    >
    > I'm really curious more to as whether pad compound or design

    contributes
    > in some way to the pads attracting grit.
    >

    Sorry, but since you appear to have experience with Kool Stop salmon
    colored pads and know where to get them, you are not "curious" about
    the pad compound or design, you really want NEW CALIPERS.

    I say, if these Nashbar long reach calipers are the same price as new
    pads, get the calipers and be done with it. Just be aware that new
    calipers doesn't necessarily mean "improved" braking....
     
  5. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 09:50:00 -0700, bfd853 wrote:

    > Sorry, but since you appear to have experience with Kool Stop salmon
    > colored pads and know where to get them, you are not "curious" about the
    > pad compound or design, you really want NEW CALIPERS.


    You haven't made a case for KS pads being glass and grit resistant--I
    haven't used them since I moved to an area with a lot of construction and
    road debris.

    Since the salmon compound is a little more "gooey" than the regular black,
    I fear it may also have issues with embedding. It's really not worth
    giving the a-holes at the local LBS $20 to find out. I might get those
    Continentals from Harris though.

    The reason I'm thinking of new calipers is that mine are 600s from
    1978--so even a set of generic Tektros (like the Nashbars) will be more
    rigid, providing better braking, and come with new pads. I do love the old
    calipers, but the adjusting barrels have frozen in their threads and no
    amount of penetrating lube will free them.
     
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