Boonen's Bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Geraard Spergen, Mar 31, 2006.

  1. http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    "Boonen will start Sunday’s Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "

    OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.
     
    Tags:


  2. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

  3. Bill C

    Bill C Guest

    B. Lafferty wrote:
    > "Geraard Spergen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    > > "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    > > director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    > >
    > > OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.

    >
    > And a rear wheel with 36 spokes. Lovely!


    Sounds like an intelligent plan to me. Especially when getting another
    bike, or support may be difficult. You've got to be there in the end to
    win. Not sure they need to spend 20,000Euros to get that though.
    Bill C
     
  4. benjo maso

    benjo maso Guest

    "Geraard Spergen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    > "Boonen will start Sunday’s Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    > director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    >
    > OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.


    Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had costed $
    250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.

    Benjo
     
  5. ST

    ST Guest

    On 3/31/06 4:35 PM, in article
    [email protected], "Bill C"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > B. Lafferty wrote:
    >> "Geraard Spergen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    >>> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    >>> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    >>>
    >>> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.

    >>
    >> And a rear wheel with 36 spokes. Lovely!

    >
    > Sounds like an intelligent plan to me. Especially when getting another
    > bike, or support may be difficult. You've got to be there in the end to
    > win. Not sure they need to spend 20,000Euros to get that though.
    > Bill C
    >


    It costs that much because it is a "one-off" machine I do see it mentioned
    they actually made 3. If it was mass produced, like most other high end
    bikes, it would probably be 7k
     
  6. Bill C

    Bill C Guest

    ST wrote:
    > On 3/31/06 4:35 PM, in article
    > [email protected], "Bill C"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > B. Lafferty wrote:
    > >> "Geraard Spergen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]
    > >>> http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    > >>> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    > >>> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    > >>>
    > >>> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.
    > >>
    > >> And a rear wheel with 36 spokes. Lovely!

    > >
    > > Sounds like an intelligent plan to me. Especially when getting another
    > > bike, or support may be difficult. You've got to be there in the end to
    > > win. Not sure they need to spend 20,000Euros to get that though.
    > > Bill C
    > >

    >
    > It costs that much because it is a "one-off" machine I do see it mentioned
    > they actually made 3. If it was mass produced, like most other high end
    > bikes, it would probably be 7k


    I'm sure that Richie Sachs could give him very comparable ride,
    reliability, and strength characteristics, at close to the same weight,
    even though they say weight isn't a factor. I'm also pretty sure that
    he'd be really happy to build 3 bikes at that price per. It's a stunt
    to promote both Boonen's power and their skill, it's not about the
    bike, it's about creating an image.
    Bill C
     
  7. >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    >>
    >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.

    >
    > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had costed $
    > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    >
    > Benjo


    Lance scrapped a whole lot more than just that bike. Oh the stories...

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
    "benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Geraard Spergen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    >>
    >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.

    >
    > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had costed $
    > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    >
    > Benjo
    >
     
  8. Bill C

    Bill C Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    > >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    > >>
    > >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.

    > >
    > > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had costed $
    > > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    > >
    > > Benjo

    >
    > Lance scrapped a whole lot more than just that bike. Oh the stories...
    >
    > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReaction.com
    > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
    > "benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "Geraard Spergen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >> http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    > >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    > >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    > >>
    > >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.

    > >
    > > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had costed $
    > > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    > >
    > > Benjo
    > >


    Hey Mike
    Thanks for the compliment in the other thread, and with Lance being
    such a type A tech geek who was "The Boss" I can just imagine what he
    put everyone through on that subject. Hopefully we get some of the
    stories some day.
    Bill
     
  9. crit pro

    crit pro Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Bill C" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm sure that Richie Sachs could give him very comparable ride...


    Hey moron, he doesn't have a year to wait for an overrated pos...
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >>"benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]
    > >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    > >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    > >>
    > >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.

    > >
    > > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had costed $
    > > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    > >
    > > Benjo

    >
    > Lance scrapped a whole lot more than just that bike. Oh the stories...


    If I've got the chronology right, is that the notorious "narrow bike"
    chronicled in Coyle's "Lance Armstrong's War"?

    That was one of the best cycling books I read last year, eclipsed only
    by Krabbe's "The Rider"

    Oh, and I haven't read "Sweat of the Gods" yet.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
    "I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
    to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
     
  11. On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 01:07:49 +0200, B. Lafferty <[email protected]> wrote:

    >


    >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.

    >
    > And a rear wheel with 36 spokes. Lovely!
    >

    Prolly all tied and soldered too like we used to do

    --
    Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
     
  12. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    "Bill C" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > ST wrote:
    > > On 3/31/06 4:35 PM, in article
    > > [email protected], "Bill C"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >
    > > > B. Lafferty wrote:
    > > >> "Geraard Spergen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > >> news:[email protected]
    > > >>> http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    > > >>> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    > > >>> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy. "
    > > >>>
    > > >>> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.
    > > >>
    > > >> And a rear wheel with 36 spokes. Lovely!
    > > >
    > > > Sounds like an intelligent plan to me. Especially when getting another
    > > > bike, or support may be difficult. You've got to be there in the end to
    > > > win. Not sure they need to spend 20,000Euros to get that though.
    > > > Bill C
    > > >

    > >
    > > It costs that much because it is a "one-off" machine I do see it mentioned
    > > they actually made 3. If it was mass produced, like most other high end
    > > bikes, it would probably be 7k

    >
    > I'm sure that Richie Sachs could give him very comparable ride,
    > reliability, and strength characteristics, at close to the same weight,
    > even though they say weight isn't a factor. I'm also pretty sure that
    > he'd be really happy to build 3 bikes at that price per. It's a stunt
    > to promote both Boonen's power and their skill, it's not about the
    > bike, it's about creating an image.


    The Shit.

    and then

    The Shit that will kill them.

    --
    Michael Press
     
  13. benjo maso

    benjo maso Guest

    "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> >>"benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> news:[email protected]
    >> >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    >> >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy.
    >> >> "
    >> >>
    >> >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.
    >> >
    >> > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had
    >> > costed $
    >> > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    >> >
    >> > Benjo

    >>
    >> Lance scrapped a whole lot more than just that bike. Oh the stories...

    >
    > If I've got the chronology right, is that the notorious "narrow bike"
    > chronicled in Coyle's "Lance Armstrong's War"?


    Indeed!


    > That was one of the best cycling books I read last year, eclipsed only
    > by Krabbe's "The Rider"


    IMO two of the best cycling books ever written.


    > Oh, and I haven't read "Sweat of the Gods" yet.


    I forgive you!

    Benjo
     
  14. Bill C

    Bill C Guest

    crit pro wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Bill C" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I'm sure that Richie Sachs could give him very comparable ride...

    >
    > Hey moron, he doesn't have a year to wait for an overrated pos...


    Once again you display your complete ignorance, what a surprise. From
    a practical, financial, and liability standpoint, almost anytime an
    engineer, or company has to solve a problem quickly they are going to
    go with something as close to off the shelf, proven, and reliable as
    possible before going with a prototype solution that has had limited
    testing as currently configured. Glaring product failure, think
    Firestone here, injuries, lawsuits, performance bonds, etc... tend to
    make engineers pretty conservative when they can't test the hell out of
    something first. That said, like I pointed out earlier, this is about
    testing a new product, highlighting their flexibility and technology,
    creating hype, pumping up Boonen's image, not that he needs it, and
    last of all taking a risk to possibly give him a tool that will leave
    him less beat up and fatigued for the finish and that will be able to
    work the way he likes.
    In a risk averse world, which this is, if it was only about meeting
    those design conditions, then there are simpler, more proven ways of
    doing it, but those wouldn't be sexy.
    You at least won a training crit yet this season?
    Bill C
     
  15. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "Davey Crockett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 01:07:49 +0200, B. Lafferty <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>

    >
    >>> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.

    >>
    >> And a rear wheel with 36 spokes. Lovely!
    >>

    > Prolly all tied and soldered too like we used to do


    And what a pain in the arse that was to do.
     
  16. > Hey Mike
    > Thanks for the compliment in the other thread, and with Lance being
    > such a type A tech geek who was "The Boss" I can just imagine what he
    > put everyone through on that subject. Hopefully we get some of the
    > stories some day.
    > Bill


    Bill: The "narrow" bike was one thing, but beyond that, there was so much
    work done in wind tunnels to make Lance more aerodynamic.. hours and hours
    at great expense, examining air flows and such... and they did in fact come
    up with a number of ways that Lance could be more aerodynamic. But aside
    from the new fabric used in his apparel, he tossed just about everything
    else aside. The primary beneficiary became Ekimov, who had no issue making
    use of various Lance cast-offs, from what I hear.

    It could be absolutely prove, beyond a doubt, that a given position on the
    bike, a different way of carrying the radio, would gain "x" seconds in a
    time trial. But if Lance decided there was something about it he didn't
    like, all that work was tossed. But in the end, you couldn't argue with
    success. Perhaps Lance needed to have those alternatives pointed out, so
    that he had a mental target of what he had to do, and then go out and do it
    his own way. To the extent that such endeavors are won & lost in the mind,
    that may be quite relevant.

    It's also possible that all the effort, all the time & money spent, was a
    signal to other teams, other riders, that THIS is what you're up against.
    It's not just Lance, but an army of people behind him, doing everything
    possible to make sure he wins.

    As for that compliment, don't worry, I won't let it happen again! No, just
    kidding, it's nice to hear from people who know there's a life outside the
    big city. I spent quite a bit of time on my grandparent's farm growing up,
    and my grandfather's work ethic always impressed me, and some of it even
    rubbed off. I learned about how work and pickup trucks and calloused hands
    and the idea that hard physical work wasn't a bad thing. Of course, he could
    never figure out how I became a long-haired "hippie" bike geek in the
    early-70s! But I'll bet the first ideas I had of "no pain, no gain" probably
    came from him. It had an effect on my work (I was never without a job, from
    age 12 on) and cycling. But one thing I never was, and never will be... a
    "morning" person. Never understood the idea that watching the sun come up
    could be a good thing.

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    "Bill C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >> >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    >> >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy.
    >> >> "
    >> >>
    >> >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.
    >> >
    >> > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had
    >> > costed $
    >> > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    >> >
    >> > Benjo

    >>
    >> Lance scrapped a whole lot more than just that bike. Oh the stories...
    >>
    >> --Mike Jacoubowsky
    >> Chain Reaction Bicycles
    >> www.ChainReaction.com
    >> Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
    >> "benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> >
    >> > "Geraard Spergen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> > news:[email protected]
    >> >> http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    >> >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    >> >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy.
    >> >> "
    >> >>
    >> >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.
    >> >
    >> > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had
    >> > costed $
    >> > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    >> >
    >> > Benjo
    >> >

    >
    > Hey Mike
    > Thanks for the compliment in the other thread, and with Lance being
    > such a type A tech geek who was "The Boss" I can just imagine what he
    > put everyone through on that subject. Hopefully we get some of the
    > stories some day.
    > Bill
    >
     
  17. Donald Munro

    Donald Munro Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > Bill: The "narrow" bike was one thing, but beyond that, there was so much
    > work done in wind tunnels to make Lance more aerodynamic.. hours and hours
    > at great expense, examining air flows and such... and they did in fact come
    > up with a number of ways that Lance could be more aerodynamic.


    Like removal of another testicle perhaps.
     
  18. Bill C

    Bill C Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > > Hey Mike
    > > Thanks for the compliment in the other thread, and with Lance being
    > > such a type A tech geek who was "The Boss" I can just imagine what he
    > > put everyone through on that subject. Hopefully we get some of the
    > > stories some day.
    > > Bill

    >
    > Bill: The "narrow" bike was one thing, but beyond that, there was so much
    > work done in wind tunnels to make Lance more aerodynamic.. hours and hours
    > at great expense, examining air flows and such... and they did in fact come
    > up with a number of ways that Lance could be more aerodynamic. But aside
    > from the new fabric used in his apparel, he tossed just about everything
    > else aside. The primary beneficiary became Ekimov, who had no issue making
    > use of various Lance cast-offs, from what I hear.
    >
    > It could be absolutely prove, beyond a doubt, that a given position on the
    > bike, a different way of carrying the radio, would gain "x" seconds in a
    > time trial. But if Lance decided there was something about it he didn't
    > like, all that work was tossed. But in the end, you couldn't argue with
    > success. Perhaps Lance needed to have those alternatives pointed out, so
    > that he had a mental target of what he had to do, and then go out and do it
    > his own way. To the extent that such endeavors are won & lost in the mind,
    > that may be quite relevant.
    >
    > It's also possible that all the effort, all the time & money spent, was a
    > signal to other teams, other riders, that THIS is what you're up against.
    > It's not just Lance, but an army of people behind him, doing everything
    > possible to make sure he wins.
    >
    > As for that compliment, don't worry, I won't let it happen again! No, just
    > kidding, it's nice to hear from people who know there's a life outside the
    > big city. I spent quite a bit of time on my grandparent's farm growing up,
    > and my grandfather's work ethic always impressed me, and some of it even
    > rubbed off. I learned about how work and pickup trucks and calloused hands
    > and the idea that hard physical work wasn't a bad thing. Of course, he could
    > never figure out how I became a long-haired "hippie" bike geek in the
    > early-70s! But I'll bet the first ideas I had of "no pain, no gain" probably
    > came from him. It had an effect on my work (I was never without a job, from
    > age 12 on) and cycling. But one thing I never was, and never will be... a
    > "morning" person. Never understood the idea that watching the sun come up
    > could be a good thing.
    >
    > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReaction.com
    > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
    >
    > "Bill C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > >> >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    > >> >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy.
    > >> >> "
    > >> >>
    > >> >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.
    > >> >
    > >> > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had
    > >> > costed $
    > >> > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    > >> >
    > >> > Benjo
    > >>
    > >> Lance scrapped a whole lot more than just that bike. Oh the stories...
    > >>
    > >> --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > >> Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > >> www.ChainReaction.com
    > >> Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
    > >> "benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]
    > >> >
    > >> > "Geraard Spergen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> > news:[email protected]
    > >> >> http://www.procycling.com/news.aspx?ID=2002
    > >> >> "Boonen will start Sunday's Tour of Flanders with a bike that Time
    > >> >> director Alain Decroix estimates would cost about 20,000 euros to buy.
    > >> >> "
    > >> >>
    > >> >> OK, that's got to be some kind of a record.
    > >> >
    > >> > Only 20.000? Peanuts. In 2004 Armstrong tried a TT-bike which had
    > >> > costed $
    > >> > 250.000. He wasn't satisfied, so it was thrown on the scrapheap.
    > >> >
    > >> > Benjo
    > >> >

    > >
    > > Hey Mike
    > > Thanks for the compliment in the other thread, and with Lance being
    > > such a type A tech geek who was "The Boss" I can just imagine what he
    > > put everyone through on that subject. Hopefully we get some of the
    > > stories some day.
    > > Bill
    > >

    Cool Story. One of my favorite people on the planet was "Old John"
    Kennedy. I have no idea how old he was when I was a teenager, I'd guess
    70. His family may have met the Mayflower, and he was "the" yankee, but
    he was also a trip. At that point he really wasn't farming anymore, was
    still living in the big family colonial which hadn't been updated since
    about 1920. He was once probably about 6'0" but age and hard work had
    bent him. What he had done was come to peace with the planet. Picture
    Jesus in overalls with a snow white beard and long hair. He was still
    cruising the farms in the area at about 20 miles an hour in his pickup,
    sipping from his hip flask all day long. Flirting with the women, who
    loved him, and giving all the rest of us good natured crap.
    We took care of his jackass at our place after he really couldn't,
    because he wanted something around more stubborn than him so he had a
    goal to work towards. He taught me to handle, and care for, a team of
    oxen. Could tell stories for months on end and was as cantankerous as
    it gets.
    His old place finally fell in a few years ago while the family was
    fighting each other over it, and now the land is up for sale. I'd love
    to be able to buy it, but it's as prime as you'd ever find here in New
    England. It starts on a ridge top along the old stage road where the
    house was, looks out all the way across the Connecticut river vally and
    goes down the hill for about a mile to the mill river which forms it's
    eastern boundary. I don't even have the heart to find out how much for
    the 65 acres that they are currently selling.
    I love the memories, but every time I get too carried away I remember
    all the hours of back breaking work too.
    Sounds like you and I turned out a lot alike in that I've never had
    any trouble being employed, and have an incredibly wide skill set, but
    can't claim to be a master of any of them. Working hard on the
    furniture/cabinetmaking/finish carpentry, but we do a lot of different
    stuff. Keeps like interesting.
    The world, and kids, need a lot more colorful old men who can spin
    good stories, and know where the bodies are buried, but they seem to be
    a dying breed. That's why I really enjoy having Davey around here.
    Someday I hope to get into the business myself.
    Bill C
     
  19. Bill C wrote:

    > Cool Story. One of my favorite people on the planet was "Old John"
    > Kennedy. I have no idea how old he was when I was a teenager, I'd guess
    > 70. His family may have met the Mayflower, and he was "the" yankee, but
    > he was also a trip. At that point he really wasn't farming anymore, was
    > still living in the big family colonial which hadn't been updated since
    > about 1920. He was once probably about 6'0" but age and hard work had
    > bent him. What he had done was come to peace with the planet. Picture
    > Jesus in overalls with a snow white beard and long hair. He was still
    > cruising the farms in the area at about 20 miles an hour in his pickup,
    > sipping from his hip flask all day long. Flirting with the women, who
    > loved him, and giving all the rest of us good natured crap.


    dumbasses,

    thanks for your applications, but maynard hershon is already the rick
    reilly of cycling.
     
  20. > thanks for your applications, but maynard hershon is already the rick
    > reilly of cycling.


    And Sundown Slim before him. You want colorful stories, find an old (as any
    will be, since it stopped publishing almost 30 years ago) issue of
    Competitive Cycling. Pretty sure Maynard had articles there too. Of course,
    so did I, including a write-up of some young punk that I thought might go
    places, some Greg something-or-other.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Bill C wrote:
    >
    >> Cool Story. One of my favorite people on the planet was "Old John"
    >> Kennedy. I have no idea how old he was when I was a teenager, I'd guess
    >> 70. His family may have met the Mayflower, and he was "the" yankee, but
    >> he was also a trip. At that point he really wasn't farming anymore, was
    >> still living in the big family colonial which hadn't been updated since
    >> about 1920. He was once probably about 6'0" but age and hard work had
    >> bent him. What he had done was come to peace with the planet. Picture
    >> Jesus in overalls with a snow white beard and long hair. He was still
    >> cruising the farms in the area at about 20 miles an hour in his pickup,
    >> sipping from his hip flask all day long. Flirting with the women, who
    >> loved him, and giving all the rest of us good natured crap.

    >
    > dumbasses,
    >
    > thanks for your applications, but maynard hershon is already the rick
    > reilly of cycling.
    >
     
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