Boot for bikes

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Steph Peters, Feb 11, 2004.

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  1. Steph Peters

    Steph Peters Guest

    There is cycling related content in this post, but be patient.

    Some scumbag drove into the side of my car and did enough damage to the bodywork and door pillar to
    write it off. So now I need a replacement. My old car was an elderly Saab 900 hatchback, chosen for
    the virtue of being able to put 2 bikes into the boot with the seat down, without the need to take
    wheels off the bikes. What other cars have hatchbacks this roomy? Other criteria are a 5 door car,
    minimum 2 litre engine (goes over the Pennines and back daily at the moment), no more than 3 years
    old which rules out another Saab 900, driving position suitable for persons of 6' 1" and 5' and no
    leather seats or trim.

    Any suggestions welcome, as we need to make a quick decision so that DH can get to work next week.
    Me, I'll just keep cycling.
    --
    The law an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.
    Mohandas Gandhi
    Steph Peters delete invalid from [email protected]
    Tatting, lace & stitching page <http://www.sandbenders.demon.co.uk/index.htm
     
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  2. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Steph Peters" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Any suggestions welcome, as we need to make a quick decision so that DH
    can
    > get to work next week.

    Citroen C5 is quite capacious, not a bad car and has poor residuals which make for a good SH buy.
    --
    Regards, Pete
     
  3. John Mallard

    John Mallard Guest

    Steph Peters wrote:
    > There is cycling related content in this post, but be patient.
    >
    > Some scumbag drove into the side of my car and did enough damage to the bodywork and door pillar
    > to write it off. So now I need a replacement. My old car was an elderly Saab 900 hatchback, chosen
    > for the virtue of being able to put 2 bikes into the boot with the seat down, without the need to
    > take wheels off the bikes. What other cars have hatchbacks this roomy? Other criteria are a 5 door
    > car, minimum 2 litre engine (goes over the Pennines and back daily at the moment), no more than 3
    > years old which rules out another Saab 900, driving position suitable for persons of 6' 1" and 5'
    > and no leather seats or trim.
    >
    > Any suggestions welcome, as we need to make a quick decision so that DH can get to work next week.
    > Me, I'll just keep cycling.

    A Smart Car with a cycle rack? ;-)

    I'll get me trouser clips

    --
    Cheerful Peddling John Mallard
     
  4. Steph Peters

    Steph Peters Guest

    "Peter B" <[email protected]> of BT Openworld wrote:
    >Citroen C5 is quite capacious, not a bad car and has poor residuals which make for a good SH buy.

    That's on the possibles list - I'm off to try and see one tomorrow morning. Wonder if they'll let me
    try putting the bike I arrive on in the boot? We've had Citroens in the past, because they did well
    on tall and short driving position.
    --
    The law an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.
    Mohandas Gandhi
    Steph Peters delete invalid from [email protected]
    Tatting, lace & stitching page <http://www.sandbenders.demon.co.uk/index.htm
     
  5. >There is cycling related content in this post, but be patient.
    >

    snipped...

    If all else fails - consider a car with a towbar and get a towbar-mounted cycle carrier...

    see www.roofbox.co.uk

    Cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam-- to get correct one remove dependency on fame &
    fortune h*$el*$$e**nd***$o$ts***i*$*$m**m$$o*n**[email protected]$*$a$$o**l.c**$*$om$$
     
  6. On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 21:43:28 +0000, Steph Peters
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Any suggestions welcome, as we need to make a quick decision so that DH can get to work next week.
    > Me, I'll just keep cycling.

    Have a look at some of these so-called compact MPVs---small estates with folding seats! We have a
    Ford Fusion into which we can get two bikes with the seats down. It's the boxier shape at the back
    which makes it easy and the fact that there's no boot lip to get things over. The Fusion may be a
    bit small for you (1.4 diesel---though ours manages the Pennines daily) but the Focus C-Max or
    similar cars from Vauxhall (Meriva?), Honda (Jazz?), etc., might be worth a ganders. The Jazz claims
    to be able to take an upright bike between the front and back seats due to a low floor pan and the
    way the seats fold (up and back as well as down and flat) but I have my doubts.

    Watch out for anything about the base models though, they have a habit of sneaking leather trim onto
    either the steering wheel or the gear know (why, I ask my self?)

    Colin
    --
     
  7. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Steph Peters wrote:
    > There is cycling related content in this post, but be patient.
    >
    > Some scumbag drove into the side of my car and did enough damage to the bodywork and door pillar
    > to write it off. So now I need a replacement. My old car was an elderly Saab 900 hatchback, chosen
    > for the virtue of being able to put 2 bikes into the boot with the seat down, without the need to
    > take wheels off the bikes. What other cars have hatchbacks this roomy? Other criteria are a 5 door
    > car, minimum 2 litre engine (goes over the Pennines and back daily at the moment), no more than 3
    > years old which rules out another Saab 900, driving position suitable for persons of 6' 1" and 5'
    > and no leather seats or trim.
    >
    > Any suggestions welcome, as we need to make a quick decision so that DH can get to work next week.
    > Me, I'll just keep cycling.
    > --
    > The law an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind. Mohandas Gandhi Steph Peters delete invalid
    > from [email protected] Tatting, lace & stitching page
    > <http://www.sandbenders.demon.co.uk/index.htm>

    Ford Mondeo hatchback will take 1, and I see no reason why you couldn't put something over the top
    of that to protect (big sheet of corrugated cardboard or the like), and put another in on
    top/slightly to one side.

    Used to fit mine in there (small tourer frame but 700c wheels) without any problems at all. If I
    angled the front wheel/bars so they were upright against the back of the seats, there'd be about a
    foot clearance between back wheel and where the boot finished (think of the bike upright with wheel
    at 90deg to frame, that's how it was lying down in there).

    With the rear seats folded down you MIGHT find it a bit of a squeeze for a 6'1 driver. Comes with
    no leather trim if so desire, and engine size options to suit what you're looking for too. A 5'
    driver would have to try it and see (and the 6'1 really) however, I'm 5'4 and it was fine for me -
    but much depends on whether you're an upright in the seat driver or a more laid back in the seat
    driver, I think.

    Velvet
     
  8. On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 09:51:45 -0000, Colin Blackburn
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The Jazz claims to be able to take an upright bike between the front and back seats due to a low
    > floor pan and the way the seats fold (up and back as well as down and flat) but I have my doubts.

    I should add that this claim probably makes it worth cycling down to the nearest Honda dealership
    just to test it. Perhaps we should all do it!

    Colin
    --
     
  9. Doug Steel

    Doug Steel Guest

    Colin Blackburn wrote:
    > On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 09:51:45 -0000, Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The Jazz claims to be able to take an upright bike between the front and back seats due to a low
    >> floor pan and the way the seats fold (up and back as well as down and flat) but I have my doubts.
    >
    >
    > I should add that this claim probably makes it worth cycling down to the nearest Honda dealership
    > just to test it. Perhaps we should all do it!

    I did that when I was looking dfor a new car 18months ago - the dealer let me try it out as well !

    It sort of works, but depends a lot on the bike.

    In my Jazz I can fit my mountain bike, but not my hybrid between the front + back seats, have to
    take the front wheel off though. The hybrid is about 2cm too long.

    Its generally easier to fold the back seat down and it will then take either bike with the front
    wheel on - but since I'm normally trying to fit in 2 bikes I take the front wheels off. I sit both
    bikes vertically, but need to twist them through the hatch. No need to lower the seatpost.

    Doug
     
  10. On 12 Feb 2004 02:36:46 -0800, [email protected] (Doug Steel)
    wrote:

    >Colin Blackburn wrote:
    >> On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 09:51:45 -0000, Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> The Jazz claims to be able to take an upright bike between the front and back seats due to a low
    >>> floor pan and the way the seats fold (up and back as well as down and flat) but I have my
    >>> doubts.
    >>
    >>
    >> I should add that this claim probably makes it worth cycling down to the nearest Honda dealership
    >> just to test it. Perhaps we should all do it!
    >
    >I did that when I was looking dfor a new car 18months ago - the dealer let me try it out as well !
    >
    >It sort of works, but depends a lot on the bike.
    >
    >In my Jazz I can fit my mountain bike, but not my hybrid between the front + back seats, have to
    >take the front wheel off though. The hybrid is about 2cm too long.
    >
    >Its generally easier to fold the back seat down and it will then take either bike with the front
    >wheel on - but since I'm normally trying to fit in 2 bikes I take the front wheels off. I sit both
    >bikes vertically, but need to twist them through the hatch. No need to lower the seatpost.
    >
    >Doug

    ...and i could get my 58cm racing bike in the back of a Lotus Excel, with both the wheels off, and a
    sheet to protect the posh leather! Those were the days, eh!

    I was amazed how much trouble it was getting my bike into the back of a Mitsi Challenger... so much
    so that I've got rid of the car ( juggernaut??? ).

    I was about to suggest the towbar mounted thingy, but the cat lover got there first.

    steve without cats for the first time in 8 years. Quiet isn't it.
     
  11. >Ford Mondeo hatchback will take 1, and I see no reason why you couldn't put something over the top
    >of that to protect (big sheet of corrugated cardboard or the like), and put another in on
    >top/slightly to one side.

    In the back of our old Sierra Estate, have had three bikes in the back of there at one time (but not
    in the biblical sense...), with the back seats folded down but could get b*gger all else in there as
    a result ;-)

    Cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam-- to get correct one remove dependency on fame &
    fortune h*$el*$$e**nd***$o$ts***i*$*$m**m$$o*n**[email protected]$*$a$$o**l.c**$*$om$$
     
  12. On 12/2/04 11:27 am, in article
    [email protected], "dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In the back of our old Sierra Estate, have had three bikes in the back of there at one time (but
    > not in the biblical sense...), with the back seats folded down but could get b*gger all else in
    > there as a result ;-)

    We had a toyota hiace combi and managed to put the MTB in the back upright along with the child
    trailer (assembled). This was on top of the half ton of gravel needed to keep the rear wheels on the
    ground during the winter.

    it really was an amazing wagon for carrying stuff. Just open the back and throw it in.

    ..d
     
  13. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Velvet <[email protected]> writes
    >Steph Peters wrote:
    >> There is cycling related content in this post, but be patient. Some scumbag drove into the side
    >> of my car and did enough damage to the bodywork and door pillar to write it off. So now I need a
    >> replacement. My old car was an elderly Saab 900 hatchback, chosen for the virtue of being able to
    >> put 2 bikes into the boot with the seat down, without the need to take wheels off the bikes. What
    >> other cars have hatchbacks this roomy?
    >d Mondeo hatchback will take 1, and I see no reason why you couldn't put something over the top of
    >that to protect (big sheet of corrugated cardboard or the like), and put another in on top/slightly
    >to one side.
    >
    >Used to fit mine in there (small tourer frame but 700c wheels) without any problems at all. If I
    >angled the front wheel/bars so they were upright against the back of the seats, there'd be about a
    >foot clearance between back wheel and where the boot finished (think of the bike upright with wheel
    >at 90deg to frame, that's how it was lying down in there).
    >

    Or just get a Mondeo Estate and have loads of room - though a bit harder to pickup than a hatchback
    which are ten a penny.

    But I think if i was going to buy a car wit this consideration in mind I'd probably go for one of
    the small MPV's like the Scencic or the Zafira. the extra height should make it easier.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  14. Eatmorepies

    Eatmorepies Guest

    "Steph Peters" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > There is cycling related content in this post, but be patient.
    >
    > Some scumbag drove into the side of my car and did enough damage to the bodywork and door pillar
    > to write it off. So now I need a replacement. My old car was an elderly Saab 900 hatchback, chosen
    > for the virtue of being able to put 2 bikes into the boot with the seat down, without the need to
    > take wheels off the bikes. What other cars have hatchbacks this roomy?

    Nissan Primera. I sold one last year for £2500 ( and was pleased with that price). It was just under
    6 years old with 54000 miles on it - dealer serviced from new.

    Huge boot bit, just poked bikes in until it got hard to shut the lid. By dropping out the wheels I
    could get four in with a bit of juggling.

    John
     
  15. "chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In message <[email protected]>, Velvet <[email protected]> writes
    > >Steph Peters wrote:
    > >> There is cycling related content in this post, but be patient. Some scumbag drove into the side
    > >> of my car and did enough damage to the bodywork and door pillar to write it off. So now I need
    > >> a replacement.
    My
    > >> old car was an elderly Saab 900 hatchback, chosen for the virtue of
    being
    > >> able to put 2 bikes into the boot with the seat down, without the need
    to
    > >> take wheels off the bikes. What other cars have hatchbacks this roomy?
    > >d Mondeo hatchback will take 1, and I see no reason why you couldn't put something over the top
    > >of that to protect (big sheet of corrugated cardboard or the like), and put another in on
    > >top/slightly to one side.
    > >
    > >Used to fit mine in there (small tourer frame but 700c wheels) without any problems at all. If I
    > >angled the front wheel/bars so they were upright against the back of the seats, there'd be about
    > >a foot clearance between back wheel and where the boot finished (think of the bike upright with
    > >wheel at 90deg to frame, that's how it was lying down in there).
    > >
    >
    > Or just get a Mondeo Estate and have loads of room - though a bit harder to pickup than a
    > hatchback which are ten a penny.
    >
    > But I think if i was going to buy a car wit this consideration in mind I'd probably go for one of
    > the small MPV's like the Scencic or the Zafira. the extra height should make it easier.
    > --
    > Chris French, Leeds

    After lots of checking and testing (taking bike to dealer) I decided on Citroen Xara Picasso. Mind
    you only looking to put one in plus liked the idea of an internal bike holder. You do have to remove
    the front wheel and the holder bolts(?) into one of the seat mountings. I don't like to leave my
    bike out of sight when its on the external bike-rack.

    Julia
     
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