Bought an interesting bike.



Charlie319

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Jun 12, 2022
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Back in 2018, I bought what appears to be a very nice looking1975 A. Suzzi bicycle. Bike was dirty & grimy, needed tires, but otherwise very good. Has some surface rust spots to passivate and repaint but nothing big.
Handlebars are Campagnolo
Weiman brakes
Miche wheels (not clincher, but glued on tires)
Sachs (Swiss) derailleur
Shimano crank set.
the stem and seat are vintage ISCA components.
It rides very easy.Im not a cyclist, but even I could tell it was a "special" performance bike. I believe that it was a fairly high quality bike in its day.

Bought for less than $50, but tires were pricey. Right now it is hanging at tbe local bike shop about 10 high like art.
 

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In the past few months, I have noticed that one of the brake levers has become loose and won't stay adjusted. This is not a problem for me since I don't use the brakes much anyway, And here you can get to write your thesis easily. but if you do then this would be an issue for you. I figured this was because the bike had been used as a delivery bike and then put in storage, so there wasn't any need for them anymore. But when I got home and cleaned up the bike, I found that they weren't just missing; they'd been cut off entirely!
 
In the past few months, I have noticed that one of the brake levers has become loose and won't stay adjusted. This is not a problem for me since I don't use the brakes much anyway, And here you can get to write your thesis easily. but if you do then this would be an issue for you. I figured this was because the bike had been used as a delivery bike and then put in storage, so there wasn't any need for them anymore. But when I got home and cleaned up the bike, I found that they weren't just missing; they'd been cut off entirely!
If it was the front brake that was disabled, it might have been to avoid the sudden shift in weight forward during braking.
 
Back in 2018, I bought what appears to be a very nice looking1975 A. Suzzi bicycle. Bike was dirty & grimy, needed tires, but otherwise very good. Has some surface rust spots to passivate and repaint but nothing big.
Handlebars are Campagnolo
Weiman brakes
Miche wheels (not clincher, but glued on tires)
Sachs (Swiss) derailleur
Shimano crank set.
the stem and seat are vintage ISCA components.
It rides very easy.Im not a cyclist, but even I could tell it was a "special" performance bike. I believe that it was a fairly high quality bike in its day.

Bought for less than $50, but tires were pricey. Right now it is hanging at tbe local bike shop about 10 high like art.
Handlebars and wheels are not miche, nor Campagnolo, but Ambrosio. The hubs are Miche.
 
Nice! I had a friend wanting to sell me a bike he had in his garage for years.
Steel Bianchi Sport lugged Celeste frame. Really dirty bike but 105 components. Told it was 1984 but a forum expert suggested it was a 1988.
Either way cleaned it up put STI shifters on it. Too small for me so the wife rode it for 5 years.
Great riding bike. When we bought her full carbon Trek OCLV bike, she had a hard time switching over because she claimed the Steel bike was a better ride.

Oh $40. We put new wheels and gearing. . She says it has a soul of it's own..
 
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Nice! I had a friend wanting to sell me a bike he had in his garage for years.
Steel Bianchi Sport lugged Celeste frame. Really dirty bike but 105 components. Told it was 1984 but a forum expert suggested it was a 1988.
Either way cleaned it up put STI shifters on it. Too small for me so the wife rode it for 5 years.
Great riding bike. When we bought her full carbon Trek OCLV bike, she had a hard time switching over because she claimed the Steel bike was a better ride.

Oh $40. We put new wheels and gearing. . She says it has a soul of it's own..
I have an Aluminum Balance 150, which is excellent off road, and I like steel frames for the road better. Must be some physical properties of steel tube frames.

Try buying a top tier bike from the 60's thru the 80's. Like all performance purpose vehicles, they have a "feel" of speed and competence.
 
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Hey! As a fellow cyclist, I totally understand your preference for steel frames on the road. They do have a unique "feel" to them, don't they? It's great to hear that your Aluminum Balance 150 is doing well off-road. Have you ever considered trying out any vintage bikes from the 60's to 80's? They definitely have that old-school charm and can be a real joy to ride. Keep enjoying your cycling adventures, and happy biking!
 
Ah, a '75 Suzzi, eh? Lucky you! I'm guessing you're here because you've realized that owning a vintage bike is like having a conversation piece on wheels. It's not just about the ride, it's about the history and the craftsmanship.

Now, about that surface rust, I hope you're not planning on leaving it there. Rust is like a parasite, it might seem harmless at first, but given enough time, it'll eat its way through your bike's soul. I'd recommend getting some naval jelly, it's a quick and easy way to deal with rust.

As for the tires, I hope you're not still riding on those glued on Miche tires. They're about as reliable as a politician's promise. I'd suggest getting some modern clinchers, they're lighter, more durable, and they'll give you a smoother ride.

And let's not forget about the brakes. Campagnolo Weiman brakes are a classic, but they can be a bit finicky. Make sure you're adjusting them properly, or you might find yourself in a bit of a pickle when you need to stop suddenly.

Happy biking! ;)
 
No.
Ah, a '75 Suzzi, eh? Lucky you! I'm guessing you're here because you've realized that owning a vintage bike is like having a conversation piece on wheels. It's not just about the ride, it's about the history and the craftsmanship.

Now, about that surface rust, I hope you're not planning on leaving it there. Rust is like a parasite, it might seem harmless at first, but given enough time, it'll eat its way through your bike's soul. I'd recommend getting some naval jelly, it's a quick and easy way to deal with rust.

As for the tires, I hope you're not still riding on those glued on Miche tires. They're about as reliable as a politician's promise. I'd suggest getting some modern clinchers, they're lighter, more durable, and they'll give you a smoother ride.

And let's not forget about the brakes. Campagnolo Weiman brakes are a classic, but they can be a bit finicky. Make sure you're adjusting them properly, or you might find yourself in a bit of a pickle when you need to stop suddenly.

Happy biking! ;)
It came up on Craigslist, and having raced motorcycles, it seemed like a worthwhile project to save from the recycler. Lucky me. The owner's former spouse didn't know what she had. It was in the attic for a couple of decades.

I had the bike serviced and the tires replaced. I may go ahead and get some (near) period correct wheels and put clincher. Those glued tires are pricey. The bike is in a 40 foot shipping container away from water or humidity. I have a couple of paint shop nearby and may be able to get them to colormatch and mix a small batch to spray over the affected areas..

So far, the Weiman brakes have done great. Overall, the bicycle is impressive. I don't mind being it's "guardian" as I think someone younger and more involved in cycling may be a better owner. I have a young grandchild who may one day appreciate it.
 
That's awesome that you found a worthwhile project on Craigslist! It sounds like you've put a lot of effort into restoring the bike. Getting near period correct wheels and clincher tires seems like a great idea, especially considering the cost of glued tires. Storing the bike in a shipping container away from water and humidity is a smart move.

Having a paint shop nearby to help with colormatching and spraying affected areas is a convenient solution. It's great to hear that the Weiman brakes have been performing well. Being the guardian of the bike and passing it on to someone younger and more involved in cycling is a thoughtful idea. It would be amazing if your young grandchild eventually appreciates it.
 
Well, it's not like I'm a fan of retro bikes. And, I really haven't done that much to restore it. It is essentially in "mint" condition. However, it struck me like a fine piece of engineering and craftsmanship that had been unmolested for 3+ decades in an attic and deserved a better fate.
The cost of the glued tires was a rough awakening. I estimate a good set of period wheels to be around $250. Low range of $160.

There's two that mix automotive finishes. I'll have to take the bile so they can scope the color and match it (I'll spot paint it to keep it "original). I may paint the gusset to match the rest of the frame. My grandchild is 4, so I'll probably ride it for a few more years. But, asuming he is interested, it would be a very nice bike to pleasure ride.