bought bike shoes, got numb feet...



kek

New Member
Aug 7, 2006
24
0
0
Hello again, yes, yet another problem. I have searched the forum about numb toes / hot feet and really I'm at a loss as to what to try because : I only had very slight numb toes - the two outer ones on each foot - when I first started riding and waering my running sneakers. I thought if I bought proper biking shoes that the mild numbness would go away but guess what ........... it got a 100 times worse! go figure. Because it got worse, I'm thinking it's the shoes. they are Specialised and cost me $80. I know it's a not a lot compared to what's out there but it's still quite a bit to pay for numb toes and hot feet don't you think? Any ideas anyone? They are really comfortable too so I was really bummed when it started. Do you think it will ease off as I get used to the shoes or is something else going on ?

The only other thing I can think of is - I did ride for longer in higher resisance grears (not sure if that's considered a high or low gear ) - ie. the larger cogs. From what I've been reading it seems I'm supposed to ride 'lighter and faster' rather than 'harder and slower' ? is that right?

Any advice is VERY much appreciated, thanks in advance :confused:
 

gclark8

Member
Apr 13, 2004
3,522
6
0
72
Try wider shoes, like runners, there needs to be room for the toes to expand.

Yes, ride 'lighter and faster' rather than 'harder and slower', low (impact) high cadence is the way to go.
 

HowardSteele

New Member
Mar 7, 2006
457
0
0
62
Any advice is VERY much appreciated, thanks in advance :confused:[/QUOTE]
The cleat position on your shoe is very important FOR SOME RIDERS FEET,they might have to be moved sideways left or right or back or forward.in my case my left shoe cleat is turned at a slight angle.This is the natural position of my foot,if the cleat is straight it means my foot twists in the shoe causing knumb little toe and hot foot.Get a friend to have a look at your foot on pedal position, without the cleats clipped in of course and then try and adjust the cleats as close as you can to natural foot position.
 

Don Shipp

New Member
May 20, 2005
1,007
0
0
64
kek said:
Hello again, yes, yet another problem. I have searched the forum about numb toes / hot feet and really I'm at a loss as to what to try because : I only had very slight numb toes - the two outer ones on each foot - when I first started riding and waering my running sneakers. I thought if I bought proper biking shoes that the mild numbness would go away but guess what ........... it got a 100 times worse! go figure. Because it got worse, I'm thinking it's the shoes. they are Specialised and cost me $80. I know it's a not a lot compared to what's out there but it's still quite a bit to pay for numb toes and hot feet don't you think? Any ideas anyone? They are really comfortable too so I was really bummed when it started. Do you think it will ease off as I get used to the shoes or is something else going on ?

The only other thing I can think of is - I did ride for longer in higher resisance grears (not sure if that's considered a high or low gear ) - ie. the larger cogs. From what I've been reading it seems I'm supposed to ride 'lighter and faster' rather than 'harder and slower' ? is that right?

Any advice is VERY much appreciated, thanks in advance :confused:
They're probably too small.
 

kek

New Member
Aug 7, 2006
24
0
0
thanks for the replies,

I don't think the shoes are too small - well they aren't when I'm just standing in them that is. In fact I did go up a half size or so in them. I can even wriggle my toes a bit in them - they aren't squished up.

I am in toe clips though - not brave enough to be clippless (yet)

I think my feet do kind of want to stick out though (or at least want to naturally if I didn't have clips of any kind on that is)

Now that I think about it. The differences on that first ride with those new shoes on were:

1 the shoes themselves of course

2
I did tighten the toe clips so maybe my feet were at a different angle than usual

3
and I was riding longer in the gears that give me the higher resistance. Slower and harder pedalling that is. Which is a whole other topic of confusion for me it seems as it appears that pedalling is what I prefer but I'm not SUPPOSED to be doing it, that it's a no-no in cycling. Oh brother!:confused:
 

gclark8

Member
Apr 13, 2004
3,522
6
0
72
kek said:
thanks for the replies,

I don't think the shoes are too small - well they aren't when I'm just standing in them that is. In fact I did go up a half size or so in them. I can even wriggle my toes a bit in them - they aren't squished up.
You still need a wider fitting for cycling and running.

A similar topic, see: http://www.cyclingforums.com/t364786.html
 

matagi

Well-Known Member
Mar 12, 2006
8,265
337
83
kek said:
Now that I think about it. The differences on that first ride with those new shoes on were:

1 the shoes themselves of course

2
I did tighten the toe clips so maybe my feet were at a different angle than usual

3
and I was riding longer in the gears that give me the higher resistance. Slower and harder pedalling that is. Which is a whole other topic of confusion for me it seems as it appears that pedalling is what I prefer but I'm not SUPPOSED to be doing it, that it's a no-no in cycling. Oh brother!:confused:

Usually, the basic thing you are taught in problem determination is to look at what has changed. Now you changed several things, so there are two possibilities - your foot problems are due to either a combination of those changes or just one of those changes. So now you need to go through these things step by step to see which, if any make a difference.

So, (1) new shoes - is it possible you have them done up too tightly? I find if I do up the velcro fastener on my shoes a little too tightly I get numb feet. So it is an easy thing to loosen off your shoes a little and see if that makes a difference.

(2) You tightened up the toe clips - if loosening the fasteners on the shoes doesn't help, then try loosening the toe clips a little and see if that helps the problem.

(3) Pedalling in a harder gear - this is actually worse for your knees than your feet, but it could be that you are putting pressure on the wrong part of your foot when you push hard on the pedals. Try backing off a gear or two, you should be aiming for a cadence of around 80 (as a rough guide).

Best of luck.
 

oscarjane

New Member
Sep 17, 2006
10
0
0
Ok I must admit I am another one for feet problems. I have clip in shoes and my toes on both feet get numb and tingling. I have checked the size of shoes, the bike set up and the cleats all are ok. I can ride for two hours and have them tingle the whole way. If any-one has any suggestions I would appreciate it.
 

HowardSteele

New Member
Mar 7, 2006
457
0
0
62
I sure you considered sock thickness as an cause,I have Mtb socks that are a little thicker than my regular mtb cycling socks and on the occasions i've used them i have had a bad foot day.
 

new2bikes

Banned
Feb 6, 2005
29
0
1
Similar issues for me. I've had the fit, foot position, and cleat position checked and adjusted. I've tried mountain bike shoes and pedals and road bike shoes and pedals. I've played around with shoe size and style, and I've tried inserts to lessen pronation. Nothing has worked exceptionally well. The numbness/tingling begins at about 3 miles and continues for the rest of the ride unless I get off the bike to rest. The one thing that helped a little was moving the cleats back slightly, but even that did not fully alleviate the problem. Any fit specialists or sport MDs out there who have a suggestion? Thanks in advance.
 

kek

New Member
Aug 7, 2006
24
0
0
just as a note : when I first got my bike and was riding it in my running shoes - my toes only bothered me only slightly, infact, hardly at all.

They bothered me A LOT the first day I ever wore my cycling shoes. Go figure :confused:

I can't say anymore than that because unfortunatly I have not been on my bike since that day with the new cycling shoes. :(
 

oscarjane

New Member
Sep 17, 2006
10
0
0
I am now racking up the klms and trying to do more each week, but my toes still tingle. I am now at a stage where I say to hell with it and my toes are enjoying the ride just as much as I am. Maybe when I buy my next shoes I will see if the cleats can be moved back even more than they are now. But as my shoes are only new I will just have to keep riding in them.
 

PearlJamFan

New Member
Oct 22, 2006
30
0
0
59
HowardSteele said:
I sure you considered sock thickness as an cause,I have Mtb socks that are a little thicker than my regular mtb cycling socks and on the occasions i've used them i have had a bad foot day.
This interests me. I too get tingly feet but have never considered the socks - I usually wear fairly thick socks, should I get much thinner ones? Thanks
 

wackydeirdre

New Member
Mar 12, 2005
341
0
0
59
kek said:
Hello again, yes, yet another problem. I have searched the forum about numb toes / hot feet and really I'm at a loss as to what to try because : I only had very slight numb toes - the two outer ones on each foot - when I first started riding and waering my running sneakers. I thought if I bought proper biking shoes that the mild numbness would go away but guess what ........... it got a 100 times worse! go figure. Because it got worse, I'm thinking it's the shoes. they are Specialised and cost me $80. I know it's a not a lot compared to what's out there but it's still quite a bit to pay for numb toes and hot feet don't you think? Any ideas anyone? They are really comfortable too so I was really bummed when it started. Do you think it will ease off as I get used to the shoes or is something else going on ?

The only other thing I can think of is - I did ride for longer in higher resisance grears (not sure if that's considered a high or low gear ) - ie. the larger cogs. From what I've been reading it seems I'm supposed to ride 'lighter and faster' rather than 'harder and slower' ? is that right?

Any advice is VERY much appreciated, thanks in advance :confused:
I also have specialized shoes. I have been reading about numb toes since last year to see if there was a solution but nothing I read was helpfull. One day last spring while cycling I realized I tended to crunch my toes up while riding. When I relaxed my toes I had no numbness. It took some conscious practice but problem solved. Hope this was of help to you! Happy riding! :)
 

HowardSteele

New Member
Mar 7, 2006
457
0
0
62
PearlJamFan said:
This interests me. I too get tingly feet but have never considered the socks - I usually wear fairly thick socks, should I get much thinner ones? Thanks
Yep experement with sock thicness,I use falke socks,the road socks are thiner than the mtb socks.I tried another mtb sock with padded sole and boy did i suffer.
 

cateye333

New Member
Sep 25, 2006
7
0
0
i got numbness as well as feet-ache :mad: when i first wore my mtb shoes (specialized). The ache was so bad that i couldnt cycle....

Anyway, i was abt to throw my new thinner nike socks away (cos i found it too short for casual walking), but i thought i gave it a try for cycling since it wont bother me if it sip down. Amazingly, the pain went away and only occassionally it numbs!

But i find with mtb shoes, the ball of my feet hurt when i am walking after cycling... any reasons/help here?
 

aicabsolut

New Member
Jul 18, 2006
18
0
0
41
I wear Specialized shoes--I have 2 pairs, one women's road style with Keo cleats for my bike and one mens/unisex style with SPD cleats for spinning. Depending on the spin bike (slight pedal differences), insoles, and wedges, I get different foot/toe problems. I also had to do some tweaking when I put the Looks on my bike in order to keep these problems from happening there.

A couple of thoughts based on what has helped me (not addressing the size/sock thickness issue):
First, if you have a valgus foot issue, then the Specialized shoe could tilt your forefoot in too much of a varus angle (b/c of the Specialized BG). But this wedge is very minor with the basic insoles, so if you're tilting out too far with your outer forefoot, try moving your cleats to the outside of the shoe, putting more of the foot over the pedal (instead of inward, which will put your 1st metatarsal joint closer to center).

Another thing, as has been mentioned, is cleat angle. If you want to ride a tiny bit toed out or straight and your current setup has you too much toe-in, then your foot is going to try to twist inside the shoe and mash your little toes against the outer part of the shoe. Even with toe clips, if you can't move your foot in the cage to the correct angle, the effect is the same. Also be sure your cages and the farthest forward strap of the shoe are not too tight..your feet might expand some while riding.

Finally, you might want to get some of the BG insoles and try the varus/valgus wedges and see what happens. Or use orthotics (if you have any) inside the shoe instead.

As for ball of the foot hot spots, I find this is often caused by the seat being too low. Or, you might be dropping one hip and thus putting too much weight over one leg, causing you to mash a little too much at the bottom of the stroke. Another possibility based on my experience is that the cleats are too far forward (or your foot isn't far enough into the toe cage). Having the ball of the foot slightly in front of the center of the pedal, in conjunction with proper seat height and staying 'light' on the pedals, helps eliminate ball of the foot hotspots.

Check out some posts on the fitness Q&As at cyclingnews.com. There's information about cleat position, leg and foot abnormalities, and how to figure out what's really going on based on things like where calluses may be forming on your feet (under the ball, out at 5th metatarsal, etc).
 

cateye333

New Member
Sep 25, 2006
7
0
0
aicabsolut said:
I wear Specialized shoes--I have 2 pairs, one women's road style with Keo cleats for my bike and one mens/unisex style with SPD cleats for spinning. Depending on the spin bike (slight pedal differences), insoles, and wedges, I get different foot/toe problems. I also had to do some tweaking when I put the Looks on my bike in order to keep these problems from happening there.

A couple of thoughts based on what has helped me (not addressing the size/sock thickness issue):
First, if you have a valgus foot issue, then the Specialized shoe could tilt your forefoot in too much of a varus angle (b/c of the Specialized BG). But this wedge is very minor with the basic insoles, so if you're tilting out too far with your outer forefoot, try moving your cleats to the outside of the shoe, putting more of the foot over the pedal (instead of inward, which will put your 1st metatarsal joint closer to center).

Another thing, as has been mentioned, is cleat angle. If you want to ride a tiny bit toed out or straight and your current setup has you too much toe-in, then your foot is going to try to twist inside the shoe and mash your little toes against the outer part of the shoe. Even with toe clips, if you can't move your foot in the cage to the correct angle, the effect is the same. Also be sure your cages and the farthest forward strap of the shoe are not too tight..your feet might expand some while riding.

Finally, you might want to get some of the BG insoles and try the varus/valgus wedges and see what happens. Or use orthotics (if you have any) inside the shoe instead.

As for ball of the foot hot spots, I find this is often caused by the seat being too low. Or, you might be dropping one hip and thus putting too much weight over one leg, causing you to mash a little too much at the bottom of the stroke. Another possibility based on my experience is that the cleats are too far forward (or your foot isn't far enough into the toe cage). Having the ball of the foot slightly in front of the center of the pedal, in conjunction with proper seat height and staying 'light' on the pedals, helps eliminate ball of the foot hotspots.

Check out some posts on the fitness Q&As at cyclingnews.com. There's information about cleat position, leg and foot abnormalities, and how to figure out what's really going on based on things like where calluses may be forming on your feet (under the ball, out at 5th metatarsal, etc).
Hey, those sound like great advise. Thanks; will try it out.
I still get the numbness occasionally and the pain on the ball of my feet has been there for a couple of months now, though not as excruciating now. I figured my feet needs some time to get use to the shoes. But i am gonna follow ur advise and get rid of the numbness and pain once and for all. Will keep this updated.

PS: I also noticed that, with cleats, i have to lengthen the seat slightly more to get an optimal pedal as opposed to normal shoes..
 

bianchigirl

New Member
Aug 19, 2004
6
0
0
60
Socks will definetely make a difference. I also was fitted with orthotics and they have made for some very pleasant riding!!!