Bought my first bike today! what else do i need right away?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Porknz, Jan 12, 2021.

  1. Porknz

    Porknz New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2021
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    I just bought my first bike today! I obviously need to get pedals and a lock. What else do I need right away to start long, casual rides? Thanks!
     
    Tags:
    Pimp-My-Bike Retail likes this.


  2. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    4,625
    Likes Received:
    369
    Congrats, now all you need to do is go ride it and have fun!

    You shouldn't rush out doing long miles, don't forget you need to get back too! Also, you don't want to hurt yourself either, or get overtired and suffer burnout. So here is a training schedule that can help you reach a 100-mile ride, this schedule is for intermediate riders, but when I looked it over I think a beginner would be fine using it. If riding 100 miles in a day is not your goal you can simply shorten to whatever amount of distance you want to ride. This is a good starting training program, it enables you to work on building up base miles, later you can get more technical to increase speed by doing intervals. Anyway see this:

    http://www.angelsofaction.org/wp-co...an-16-week-intermediate-experienced-rider.pdf

    As you are doing this change the route, find a bunch of routes so you don't get into a boring routine...unless you're the type of person who likes boring routines!

    Next, you need to go on YouTube and watch videos on how to fix a flat on the road. So the first video shows you how to do that by replacing the flatted tube with a new spare tube: https://www.google.com/search?q=how...me&ie=UTF-8#kpvalbx=_sZsDYOCaC4SDtQbD_5zQBQ13

    The next video shows you how to fix that tube you flatted, while this video will push Park tools it's still a good video:

    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0F_hibWHlU


    Of course, in order to fix a flat, you need a few tools, nothing really expensive though. The first thing you need is a good mini pump, most mini pumps are not good at pumping despite their claims of reaching 160 psi they would be lucky to hit 70 psi, not enough for a road bike. So the best one on the market, in my opinion, is the Lezyne Road Drive or if you want a built-in PSI gauge there is the Digital Road Drive. There are maybe 3 or 4 others that are also decent, but the Road Drive will get to operating PSI in fewer strokes than those others, but they too will get to operating psi just takes more effort.

    You also need a set of tire irons, there are two really nice ones on the market, the first one is the Pedros Tire Lever, and the other is the Soma Steel Core Tire Lever, I like the Soma the best and I own both so I've tried them both; nothing wrong with the Pedros, but plastic has me concerned in really cold weather for fear they might snap, I've had that happen but not with the Soma.

    You also need a patch kit. Starting out I would go with the Rema TT 02 Touring Repair Kit, I think Rema is the best glue on patches, again an opinion. Once you figure out how to do those, then ask me about using Park Super Glueless Patches, they're a tad more difficult to use but they're all I've used in the last 25 years or so with no failure except for 2 in the very beginning, and failures with other brands, Park is the best one. The problem with glue on patches is that once you open the glue to use it will dry out eventually inside the tube, so every season you need to buy a new tube of glue, not expensive but it needs to be done. With glueless patches there is no glue tube...HOWEVER, the adhesive on the patches will dry out and those should be replaced every year, again not expensive. Of course without a glue tube that's just one less thing to store.

    You should also get a seat bag large enough to hold a spare tube, the tire irons, and the patch kit, with a bit of room to spare so you can add stuff as you go. The best one on the market is the Topeak Wedge Drybag with a strap mount. But if you want to save money then get the BV Bicycle Strap-On Bike Saddle Bag, this bag is a fantastic bag at an incredibly low price, it compares to any bag out there regardless of the price other than waterproof ones like the Topeak I mentioned. I have both of those as well, I use the Topeak on my touring bike, but I use the BV on my commuter and on my weekend bike. I did spray the BV bag with a waterproof spray, but that stuff only does so much, but like I said it's a great bag, and it expands!

    You'll need water bottle cages, just buy whatever you like, there isn't a big deal between any of them unless you're a weight weenie, I just find something that matches my bike. I do like 50 Strong Bicycle Cage, it's made in the USA, and on Amazon, you can get a two-pack for $11 and it's reasonably lightweight, but it only comes in shiny black, if you don't like that color simply find any cage you do like.

    With those cages you'll need water bottles, I prefer Camelbak Podium Ice because I like my drinks to stay cold for as long as possible, though when I tour I use the Camebak vacuum bottles because I want stuff to stay cold for the entire day, not for just 3 to 4 hours.

    You should also consider getting a floor pump, but if money is tight you can use the mini pump till you get the money. The best one for the money is the Lezyne Steel Floor Drive I think.

    Anyway, that should get you started, others will have a different opinion than mine, so you have to read those and see what fits your needs the best. I will add just be careful, if you get a cheaper mini pump you will be very dissatisfied with it the first you use it! You could get a cheap floor pump from Walmart for under $20 and it will last 2 or 3 years, maybe 4 if you're lucky, but if money is an issue that's one way to get what you need now and wait till something breaks and get something better down the road.
     
    Porknz likes this.
  3. Porknz

    Porknz New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2021
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    This is fantastic! I spent the day today looking at maps of local trails, which got me to thinking, a bike rack would be nice so that I could drive to designated trails a little easier. Thinking about the Kuat 2.0 base. Maybe when my REI dividend comes through. Can't wait until April and the snow melts to get out there. Will definitely watch this video and learn about fixing a flat. That sounds key. Also, thinking about bags. Any preference to under seat, vs front, vs frame, vs top tube? Also, with no tools at all, are there full...starter kits? (Bags - it's a Salsa Journey Sora, so I'm trying to stick to the bolt on options I think. Seems like that makes the most sense?) Thanks so much for taking the time to help a new guy.
     
  4. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Messages:
    2,277
    Likes Received:
    139
  5. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    4,625
    Likes Received:
    369
    Since I don't know you I have no clue as to what your abilities are when it comes to fixing a bike. If your abilities are nonexistent then why take tools? If you do have a good mechanical aptitude and can repair bikes then look into getting a mini tool. Because I ride 30 to 50 miles from home, plus do bike camping I carry a chunky Park MTB-3 mini tool, it will do almost anything except weld! Ok, it also won't pull cranks, so major repairs are out, but major repairs are extremely rare, most bike problems are minor, heck I can't even remember the last time I had a breakdown. I did use the tool to make a seat adjustment but that's hardly a breakdown.

    But most people just carry minimal tools and a cell phone, I do carry a cell phone but in the last 38 years of being married, I've only had to call my wife three times, once because I got diarrhea really bad and I couldn't ride, so she came and got me, and the other time I had a bike crash and was at a hospital; and the last time I called her was just 3 months ago when my seat broke while on a camping trip, I tried to fix it but it was beyond repair and I can't ride a loaded touring bike while standing constantly for 45 miles! otherwise, I stay independent when I ride. My wife is my wife, not my mommy, and I refuse to have her come get me, I will walk if I have to...well as long as it isn't walking 45 miles with a loaded bike! Even if I had a nonrepairable breakdown 20 miles out on an unloaded bike I would call her at that point since a 6 to 7 hour walk would make my wife worry.

    I know people who call their mommies, err, I mean wives, because they got a flat?! Strange as that sounds it's true.

    Heck, my wife has called me a lot while I've been riding since I started to carry a cell phone, usually wanting to know when I'll be back.

    I would start with an under-seat bag, you really don't need any other bag unless you're wanting to do camping of course. I did mention a couple of bags in my first comment to you, you have figure out all the stuff you want to carry
     
  6. Porknz

    Porknz New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2021
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1

    I would like to be able to fix a flat on the trail for sure, so I'll start learning. I'll ask my local bike shop to set me up with what I need to do that on the trail too. I guess at the very least, if I'm somewhere a vehicle can't drive, or where I don't get cell coverage (does that exist anymore?) I want to be able just fix a flat and then keep going. Thanks.
     
  7. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    4,625
    Likes Received:
    369
    I still run into areas while riding where there is no cell coverage and I use AT&T, when I was with T-Mobil there were more areas with no cell coverage, heck even within the city where I live there were spots without cell coverage on the T-Mobil network! While I don't get that anymore with AT&T inside the city there are few isolated areas out in the country where I live where there is no coverage, also one of the places I camp at has no coverage; I have to ride about a mile out of the camp to get a cell. In some states like Michigan, Wyoming, Texas, etc, out in the more isolated areas, you could go for miles without a signal.
     
Loading...
Loading...