Bovine trail builders.

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Tj, Apr 23, 2003.

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  1. Tj

    Tj Guest

    I did not know that cows have built in clinometers. They can make a bench cut with out any trail
    care crew training. Switchbacks are always a pleasure to ride when cut by a cow. They can make
    contol points while chewing a cud. They naturally keep the dust down by "watering" . I would say
    that cows make better singletrack builders. The world needs more cows. Not just on bikes either.

    TJ
     
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  2. Mattb

    Mattb Guest

    "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I did not know that cows have built in clinometers. They can make a bench cut with out any trail
    > care crew training. Switchbacks are always a pleasure to ride when cut by a cow. They can make
    > contol points while chewing a cud. They naturally keep the dust down by "watering" . I would say
    > that cows make better singletrack builders. The world needs more
    cows.
    > Not just on bikes either.
    >
    > TJ
    >
    >

    Those Fruita cows must be smarter than the Gunnison ones. While our cows are good at starting
    trails, they will often make eight or ten parallel trails instead of one. They also don't stay off
    when it's wet and end up making them all chopped up. Then to top it all off, they drop those big
    land mines that will blow up all over you (and sometimes your bite valve) if you hit one. All that
    being said, some of my favorite trails were started by cows and then refined by humans. That seems
    to be a good combo.

    Matt (Beef. It makes trails.)
     
  3. MattB says:

    >All that being said, some of my favorite trails were started by cows and then refined by humans.
    >That seems to be a good combo.

    My best memory of hillside trails cut by animals were the trails on the Wares west of Swanage
    (that's as in Dorset, England) by the sheep from Giles' Farm. Used to walk down there once a week or
    so to go swimming. Perfect little trails, occasional switchbacks.

    Steve
     
  4. Tj

    Tj Guest

    "MattB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I did not know that cows have built in clinometers. They can make a
    bench
    > > cut with out any trail care crew training. Switchbacks are always a pleasure to ride when cut by
    > > a cow. They can make contol points while chewing a cud. They naturally keep the dust down by
    > > "watering" . I
    would
    > > say that cows make better singletrack builders. The world needs more
    > cows.
    > > Not just on bikes either.
    > >
    > > TJ
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Those Fruita cows must be smarter than the Gunnison ones. While our cows
    are
    > good at starting trails, they will often make eight or ten parallel trails instead of one. They
    > also don't stay off when it's wet and end up making them all chopped up. Then to top it all off,
    > they drop those big land
    mines
    > that will blow up all over you (and sometimes your bite valve) if you hit one. All that being
    > said, some of my favorite trails were started by cows and then refined by humans. That seems to be
    > a good combo.
    >
    > Matt (Beef. It makes trails.)
    >
    >
    I agree cows have a tendency to wander and not go anywhere that you want to be. Regarding the
    landmines they lay. Those are usually dried up within minutes. We have some folks around here that
    paint the cowchips and sell them as art.

    TJ
     
  5. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 21:56:10 -0600, TJ wrote:

    > I agree cows have a tendency to wander and not go anywhere that you want to be. Regarding the
    > landmines they lay. Those are usually dried up within minutes.

    "Minutes?". In a furnace maybe.

    > We have some folks around here that paint the cowchips and sell them as art.

    Lemme guess - to tourists?

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  6. Mattb

    Mattb Guest

    "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    <snip>
    > >
    > I agree cows have a tendency to wander and not go anywhere that you want
    to
    > be. Regarding the landmines they lay. Those are usually dried up within minutes. We have some
    > folks around here that paint the cowchips and sell them as art.
    >
    > TJ
    >

    I don't know about drying in minutes, that usually just creates the hardened shell that keeps the
    soft insides fresh (from my experience). Maybe it's because it cooler up here. Although once they do
    dry in a day or two they are quite benign and sometimes a good launch point for a bunny hop. Just be
    sure it really is dry and not just hardened a little on the outside!

    Matt
     
  7. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 10:17:45 -0600, MattB wrote:

    > I don't know about drying in minutes, that usually just creates the hardened shell that keeps the
    > soft insides fresh (from my experience).

    This guy has had way too much experience with cow shit. Then again, I grew up on a ranch so I have
    to say the same thing about me.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  8. Mattb

    Mattb Guest

    "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 10:17:45 -0600, MattB wrote:
    >
    > > I don't know about drying in minutes, that usually just creates the
    hardened
    > > shell that keeps the soft insides fresh (from my experience).
    >
    > This guy has had way too much experience with cow shit. Then again, I grew up on a ranch so I have
    > to say the same thing about me.
    >

    I'd have to agree. Given the choice I'd take a little less experience with
    it. Unfortunately it's a pretty permanent part of the landscape here. It literally comes with the
    territory.

    Matt (and that ain't no BS!)
     
  9. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 10:17:45 -0600, MattB wrote:
    >
    > > I don't know about drying in minutes, that usually just creates the
    hardened
    > > shell that keeps the soft insides fresh (from my experience).
    >
    > This guy has had way too much experience with cow shit. Then again, I grew up on a ranch so I have
    > to say the same thing about me.
    >
    > --
    > -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)

    Yeah. I spent a not insubstantial part of my early life on a dairy farm and milking cows. I might
    have seen plenty of cow shit, but I don't appreciate it any more because of it. On a frosty cold
    morning, the feeling of a warm, wet steaming cowpat blobbing it's way off the top of your head and
    down the neck of your overalls is something that you don't forget easily...
    --
    Westie
     
  10. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 10:17:45 -0600, MattB wrote:
    > >
    > > > I don't know about drying in minutes, that usually just creates the
    > hardened
    > > > shell that keeps the soft insides fresh (from my experience).
    > >
    > > This guy has had way too much experience with cow shit. Then again, I
    grew
    > > up on a ranch so I have to say the same thing about me.
    > >
    > > --
    > > -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
    >
    > Yeah. I spent a not insubstantial part of my early life on a dairy farm
    and
    > milking cows. I might have seen plenty of cow shit, but I don't
    appreciate
    > it any more because of it. On a frosty cold morning, the feeling of a
    warm,
    > wet steaming cowpat blobbing it's way off the top of your head and down
    the
    > neck of your overalls is something that you don't forget easily...

    You milked the cow with your head up its ass?!?

    Bill "I've heard of cold ears, but that's ridiculous" S.
     
  11. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 14:32:30 +1200, Westie wrote:

    > Yeah. I spent a not insubstantial part of my early life on a dairy farm and milking cows. I might
    > have seen plenty of cow shit, but I don't appreciate it any more because of it. On a frosty cold
    > morning, the feeling of a warm, wet steaming cowpat blobbing it's way off the top of your head and
    > down the neck of your overalls is something that you don't forget easily...

    Yikes, I'm glad we raised beef cattle!

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  12. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Sorni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 10:17:45 -0600, MattB wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > I don't know about drying in minutes, that usually just creates the
    > > hardened
    > > > > shell that keeps the soft insides fresh (from my experience).
    > > >
    > > > This guy has had way too much experience with cow shit. Then again, I
    > grew
    > > > up on a ranch so I have to say the same thing about me.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
    > >
    > > Yeah. I spent a not insubstantial part of my early life on a dairy farm
    > and
    > > milking cows. I might have seen plenty of cow shit, but I don't
    > appreciate
    > > it any more because of it. On a frosty cold morning, the feeling of a
    > warm,
    > > wet steaming cowpat blobbing it's way off the top of your head and down
    > the
    > > neck of your overalls is something that you don't forget easily...
    >
    > You milked the cow with your head up its ass?!?
    >
    > Bill "I've heard of cold ears, but that's ridiculous" S.

    LOL! OK, you got me!
    --
    Westie
     
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