Bradley Wiggins's mentor admits to cheating

Discussion in 'Professional Cycling' started by Dave Pace, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. Dave Pace

    Dave Pace Member

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    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/sport/cycling/bradley-wigginss-mentor-admits-to-cheating/story-fn8sc2wz-1226504884870


    SEAN Yates, the former rider who helped mastermind Bradley Wiggins' Tour de France win in July and was Lance Armstrong's mentor, has become the latest victim of the sport's doping scandal.

    Yates has stood down from his position as senior sporting director with Wiggins's Team Sky after admitting to doping during his riding career. Dutch coach Steven de Jongh is also understood to have left the team.
    The departure of Yates comes within days of Team Sky's American coach Bobby Julich quitting after admitting to doping between 1996 and 1998.
    Team Sky team principal Dave Brailsford declined to comment specifically on Yates and de Jongh when contacted. Nor would Shane Sutton, the Australian-born former rider, who is effectively Brailsford's number two.
    "We set out (from the very beginning) with a zero tolerance policy, so we said that anyone who has had a doping conviction from the past or proved to have been involved in doping hasn't got a place at Team Sky. That's our policy," Brailsford said.

    Yates, 52, rode professionally between 1982 and 1996, first with Peugeot, before switching to 7-Eleven and Motorola in 1991.
    During his final year at Motorola, it was Yates who took on a mentoring role with Armstrong and is credited with teaching the Texan how to descend on mountain stages.
    In 1988, Yates won stage six of the Tour de France, a time trial at Wasquehal where he recorded the fastest average speed in the race's history to that point.
    Meanwhile, five European newspapers have published a manifesto to reform cycling in the wake of the affair, saying the sport is mired in a "terrible mess".
    Britain's The Times, L'Equipe in France, Italy's La Gazzetta dello Sport, and Belgian papers Het Nieuwsblad and Le Soir joined forces to promote an eight-point manifesto designed to fix both cycling's governance and its reputation.
    "The authorities have lost all credibility and there can be no new beginning for the sport without a radical sweeping away of those who are associated with, and responsible for, a regime that allowed cheating on its watch," The Times said.
    A damning report two weeks ago by the US Anti-Doping Agency concluded Armstrong helped orchestrate the most sophisticated doping program in the history of sport. The five newspapers were "coming together to promote a manifesto to repair the governing structure of professional cycling and redeem its reputation before it is too late".
    They demanded an overhaul of its structures, rules and leaders.
    The manifesto called for an independent and neutral commission, under the responsibility of the World Anti-Doping Agency, to investigate the Union Cycliste Internationale's role in the Armstrong affair to see if there was any complicity.
    It said drug-testing structures should be instigated by WADA and enforced by national anti-doping agencies.
    It called for harsher penalties, saying teams should not employ riders suspended for more than six months for a supplementary period of two years.
    All teams should accept that a rider implicated in a doping probe should automatically be withdrawn from competition pending the investigation's outcome.
    It called for reform in the World Tour of leading races and its points system, proposing that team licences should be awarded to sponsors and not team managers, to defeat the "closed shop".
    It said the UCI should publish an annual report clarifying its activities and progress.
    ADDITIONAL REPORTING: AFP
     
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  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    We already knew that. So what of it?
     
  3. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    sean yates was the other rider pioneering the triathlon bars in the 89' tour together with lemond,
     
  4. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    I am sure that Sean Yeats was committed to Sky's zero-tolerance policy, but when news of his past doping became inevitable he had to leave. As teams become more committed to combat doping, this is bound to happen to many riders of his era who now work for those teams.

    Maybe he can find a job at Garmin. They don't discriminate.
     
  5. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I can't decide whether it's right or it's wrong for teams to axe staff who admit to doping in the past. At some point, it has be to distinguished what is relevant from the past and what isn't. I think that some ex-dopers can serve a useful purpose, and can provide motivation to not dope. After all, it seems that David Millar is exactly the sort of guy you'd want on a team. Of course, I don't know how many ex-doper are cut from David Millar's cloth. How do teams and cycling accurately measure the fiber in someone's character? Armstrong's was measured and found lacking. Where does that line need to be in cycling's timeline beyond which forgiveness is not an option?
     
  6. Dave Pace

    Dave Pace Member

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    Well just think if the US government adopted that zero-tolerance policy. Bush, Clinton, Obama, and a heck of a lot more would not have been president. It may be for the better.
     
  7. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I think politics should be left out of the bike talk, and the two cases are in very few ways similar.
     
  8. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Sky's strict policy pretty much eliminates an entire generation of riders from consideration. I think they're cutting out a good measure of useful talent, but that's their policy, they're sticking to it, and you have to respect their uncompromising stand against doping. On the other hand, Garmin's confess-and-forgive policy is more to my favor.

    I believe the timing of the inception and makeup of the teams is relevant. The senior Garmin riders were veterans of teams that had established doping programs, like USPS and DIscovery, or showed at least a cavalier attitude about doping by their individual members, like Saunier-Duval.

    The participation level is also relevant. Guys who were pretty much coerced or backed into it and wanted out, like Zabriskie and Millar, were Garmin material. Instigators like Armstrong, obviously not. Guys somewhere in the middle, like Hamilton, Landis, and Leipheimer, probably not. It's going to be interesting to see if anyone picks up Leipheimer for next year. Hincapie is interesting because he stayed on USPS/Discovery so long, but when he left it was for High Road, an anti-doping team.

    Vaughters gets a lot of criticism for grandstanding and speculation that his anti-doping stand at Garmin is more about marketing, but to his credit he got out of USPS as soon as he could, and he took some flak for landing at Credit Agricole, a rather second- or third-rate team. I think he's full of himself but thoroughly committed to what he's doing, There's a special place in my heart for people like that.

    I also admire what David Brailsford is doing at Sky, building a team from riders who have come up the British development ranks or at least have not been tainted. The sport is better because of both of these guys.
     
  9. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    The title of this thread is misleading in that Yates hasn't admitted to anything.
     
  10. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    We know that. We're just hijacking it with our inferences. Frankly, I have no idea what the OP had in mind when he started this.

    Maybe we are reading to much into this. According to The Independent, (http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/general/others/cycling-sean-yates-insists-retirement-has-no-connection-to-team-sky-doping-probe-8229979.html) this has nothing to do with doping. I hate being presumptuous or wrong, but in this case I hope I am.
     
  11. Dave Pace

    Dave Pace Member

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    The title is from the news that I posted. Not my words.
     
  12. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    OK I can see where you quoted the title from a newspaper article. The newspaper article is incorrect. Yates admitted nothing.

    Whether there is something that he ought to admit to is another thing.
     
  13. oscacom

    oscacom New Member

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    It is difficult find a cyclist that has been in elite cycling winning races without use dopping . More or less sophisticated but dopping.
    System in cycling had played with "drugs" since cycling started.
     
  14. trxsale

    trxsale New Member

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    [SIZE=10.5000pt]This article is very good. I like it so much. It is useful, keep working. good job, friends.[/SIZE]
     
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