brake pad treatments?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by g.daniels, Aug 27, 2004.

  1. g.daniels

    g.daniels Guest

    I bought a can of alcohol! speaking of faulkner and
    (begankillingarmadillawithashotgunborrowedfromernest)started wiping
    the brake system with CHO not isopropyl with water as rubbing CHO like
    in the superduper.
    Too volatile? mix with %20-%30 h20 to slow it down.
    removes the CC Epic after a chain lube.
    on the brake pads, the CHO straight seems to soften pad rubber and
    increase wet weather brake friction.
    I'm running hehehe flea marketspecials: currently a pad containing
    cotton fibers for extra abrasion.
    possibly each pad type has a solvenbt all its own or spec solvents for
    spec uses
    any thoughts?
    on a list of pad treaments?
    whatta yawl put on the salmon rubber???
     
    Tags:


  2. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    > g.daniels wrote:
    >> I bought a can of alcohol! speaking of faulkner and
    >> (begankillingarmadillawithashotgunborrowedfromernest)started wiping
    >> the brake system with CHO not isopropyl with water as rubbing CHO
    >> like in the superduper.
    >> Too volatile? mix with %20-%30 h20 to slow it down.
    >> removes the CC Epic after a chain lube.
    >> on the brake pads, the CHO straight seems to soften pad rubber and
    >> increase wet weather brake friction.
    >> I'm running hehehe flea marketspecials: currently a pad containing
    >> cotton fibers for extra abrasion.
    >> possibly each pad type has a solvenbt all its own or spec solvents
    >> for spec uses
    >> any thoughts?
    >> on a list of pad treaments?
    >> whatta yawl put on the salmon rubber???

    >
    > You've got to go easy sniffing that stuff, mate. It's making your
    > posts go all funny.


    Whaddya, NEW?

    Bill "gd more coherent than normal (pardon THAT term)" S.
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    g.daniels wrote:
    > I bought a can of alcohol! speaking of faulkner and
    > (begankillingarmadillawithashotgunborrowedfromernest)started wiping
    > the brake system with CHO not isopropyl with water as rubbing CHO like
    > in the superduper.
    > Too volatile? mix with %20-%30 h20 to slow it down.
    > removes the CC Epic after a chain lube.
    > on the brake pads, the CHO straight seems to soften pad rubber and
    > increase wet weather brake friction.
    > I'm running hehehe flea marketspecials: currently a pad containing
    > cotton fibers for extra abrasion.
    > possibly each pad type has a solvenbt all its own or spec solvents for
    > spec uses
    > any thoughts?
    > on a list of pad treaments?
    > whatta yawl put on the salmon rubber???


    You've got to go easy sniffing that stuff, mate. It's making your posts
    go all funny.

    ~PB
     
  4. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On 27 Aug 2004 09:54:42 -0700, [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote:


    >whatta yawl put on the salmon rubber???


    Sandpaper every now and then.
     
  5. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    g.daniels wrote:

    > ...
    > whatta yawl put on the salmon rubber???


    Tartar sauce.

    --
    Tom Sherman
     
  6. [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I bought a can of alcohol! speaking of faulkner and
    > (begankillingarmadillawithashotgunborrowedfromernest)started wiping
    > the brake system with CHO not isopropyl with water as rubbing CHO like
    > in the superduper.
    > Too volatile? mix with %20-%30 h20 to slow it down.
    > removes the CC Epic after a chain lube.
    > on the brake pads, the CHO straight seems to soften pad rubber and
    > increase wet weather brake friction.
    > I'm running hehehe flea marketspecials: currently a pad containing
    > cotton fibers for extra abrasion.
    > possibly each pad type has a solvenbt all its own or spec solvents for
    > spec uses
    > any thoughts?
    > on a list of pad treaments?
    > whatta yawl put on the salmon rubber???


    Gene,

    Long time no posts.. I look forward to your additions here.

    But what on earth were you doing blowing away armadilla??
    Especially now that your breaks are performing better... .

    Tom
     
  7. g.daniels

    g.daniels Guest

    yawl never lived until yawl run over a scootin armadilla!
    that's why ya gotta rub softener on the pads.
    nobody rubs softeners on the pads?
    holy armadilla!
     
  8. g. daniels wrote:

    > yawl never lived until yawl run over a scootin armadilla!
    > that's why ya gotta rub softener on the pads.
    > nobody rubs softeners on the pads?
    > holy armadilla!


    I've heard one defense mechanism used by armadillos is to jump straight up
    about 4 feet in the air. I'd hate to experience that on a bicycle ...

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    I regret to say that we of the FBI are powerless to act in cases of
    oral-genital intimacy, unless it has in some way obstructed interstate
    commerce. -- J. Edgar Hoover
     
  9. On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 14:16:38 -0700, Benjamin Lewis
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >g. daniels wrote:
    >
    >> yawl never lived until yawl run over a scootin armadilla!
    >> that's why ya gotta rub softener on the pads.
    >> nobody rubs softeners on the pads?
    >> holy armadilla!

    >
    >I've heard one defense mechanism used by armadillos is to jump straight up
    >about 4 feet in the air. I'd hate to experience that on a bicycle ...


    Dear Benjamin,

    Two stray thoughts . . .

    First, in the Bela Lugosi "Dracula," the vampire's
    Transylvanian castle is infested--horrors!--with
    armadillos. (The director thought that they looked
    sinister.)

    Second, do you have sprinting Welsh armadillos in mind when
    you mention them coming completely off the ground?

    Carl Fogel
     
  10. On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:36:27 -0600, [email protected]
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 14:16:38 -0700, Benjamin Lewis
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>g. daniels wrote:
    >>
    >>> yawl never lived until yawl run over a scootin armadilla!
    >>> that's why ya gotta rub softener on the pads.
    >>> nobody rubs softeners on the pads?
    >>> holy armadilla!

    >>
    >>I've heard one defense mechanism used by armadillos is to jump straight up
    >>about 4 feet in the air. I'd hate to experience that on a bicycle ...

    >
    >Dear Benjamin,
    >
    >Two stray thoughts . . .
    >
    >First, in the Bela Lugosi "Dracula," the vampire's
    >Transylvanian castle is infested--horrors!--with
    >armadillos. (The director thought that they looked
    >sinister.)
    >
    >Second, do you have sprinting Welsh armadillos in mind when
    >you mention them coming completely off the ground?
    >
    >Carl Fogel


    I was a fool to doubt Benjamin Lewis--here's the kind of
    incontrovertible proof that's needed!

    http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/armadillo.html

    And here's the equivalent of rec.armadillo.tech:

    http://www.msu.edu/~nixonjos/armadillo/faq.html

    It also slipped my mind that armadillos are sinister insofar
    as they are the only other animal that can host the sluggish
    leprosy bacteria.

    I long to know how high a hundred-pound giant South American
    armadillo can leap straight up in a defense reflex--given
    its size, it might beat the human high-jump record.

    Carl Fogel
     
  11. [email protected] wrote:

    > On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 14:16:38 -0700, Benjamin Lewis <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> g. daniels wrote:
    >>
    >>> yawl never lived until yawl run over a scootin armadilla! that's why
    >>> ya gotta rub softener on the pads. nobody rubs softeners on the pads?
    >>> holy armadilla!

    >>
    >> I've heard one defense mechanism used by armadillos is to jump straight
    >> up about 4 feet in the air. I'd hate to experience that on a bicycle
    >> ...

    >
    > Dear Benjamin,
    >
    > Two stray thoughts . . .
    >
    > First, in the Bela Lugosi "Dracula," the vampire's Transylvanian castle
    > is infested--horrors!--with armadillos. (The director thought that they
    > looked sinister.)


    Hmm. "Armadillo infestation". I don't believe I've seen those words
    together before. Truly, a lovely image.

    > Second, do you have sprinting Welsh armadillos in mind when you mention
    > them coming completely off the ground?


    http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/armadillo.html

    "Of the twenty species of armadillo that exist throughout the Americas, the
    nine-banded armadillo (dasypus novemcinctus) is the only one found in the
    United States. When startled, the nine-banded armadillo can jump straight
    upward about three to four feet into the air. This reflex may help scare
    off predators in the wild. Unfortunately, many armadillos are killed when
    they jump into the underside of moving vehicles."


    http://www.lsm.us.mensa.org/dillojump.htm
    http://www.trinity.edu/PHERTEL/party.htm


    A Google search for 'sprinting welsh armadillo' doesn't turn up much,
    surprisingly. Have I missed something? Is this an allusion to Eadweard
    Muybridge? (Wasn't he English-born?)

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    I regret to say that we of the FBI are powerless to act in cases of
    oral-genital intimacy, unless it has in some way obstructed interstate
    commerce. -- J. Edgar Hoover
     
  12. [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > I long to know how high a hundred-pound giant South American armadillo
    > can leap straight up in a defense reflex--given its size, it might beat
    > the human high-jump record.


    Don't you think a larger armadillo will have a poorer power-to-weight ratio?

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    I regret to say that we of the FBI are powerless to act in cases of
    oral-genital intimacy, unless it has in some way obstructed interstate
    commerce. -- J. Edgar Hoover
     
  13. On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:01:51 -0700, Benjamin Lewis
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 14:16:38 -0700, Benjamin Lewis <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> g. daniels wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> yawl never lived until yawl run over a scootin armadilla! that's why
    >>>> ya gotta rub softener on the pads. nobody rubs softeners on the pads?
    >>>> holy armadilla!
    >>>
    >>> I've heard one defense mechanism used by armadillos is to jump straight
    >>> up about 4 feet in the air. I'd hate to experience that on a bicycle
    >>> ...

    >>
    >> Dear Benjamin,
    >>
    >> Two stray thoughts . . .
    >>
    >> First, in the Bela Lugosi "Dracula," the vampire's Transylvanian castle
    >> is infested--horrors!--with armadillos. (The director thought that they
    >> looked sinister.)

    >
    >Hmm. "Armadillo infestation". I don't believe I've seen those words
    >together before. Truly, a lovely image.
    >
    >> Second, do you have sprinting Welsh armadillos in mind when you mention
    >> them coming completely off the ground?

    >
    >http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/armadillo.html
    >
    >"Of the twenty species of armadillo that exist throughout the Americas, the
    >nine-banded armadillo (dasypus novemcinctus) is the only one found in the
    >United States. When startled, the nine-banded armadillo can jump straight
    >upward about three to four feet into the air. This reflex may help scare
    >off predators in the wild. Unfortunately, many armadillos are killed when
    >they jump into the underside of moving vehicles."
    >
    >
    >http://www.lsm.us.mensa.org/dillojump.htm
    >http://www.trinity.edu/PHERTEL/party.htm
    >
    >
    >A Google search for 'sprinting welsh armadillo' doesn't turn up much,
    >surprisingly. Have I missed something? Is this an allusion to Eadweard
    >Muybridge? (Wasn't he English-born?)


    Dear Benjamin,

    Great minds google alike--we found the same irrefutable link
    to armadillo-hopping.

    Since they do indeed seem to come completely off the ground,
    I conclude that we are not discussing Welsh sprinting
    armadillos, but Trevor Jeffrey, late of this newsgroup, may
    beg to differ.

    Carl Fogel
     
  14. On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:06:23 -0700, Benjamin Lewis
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >> I long to know how high a hundred-pound giant South American armadillo
    >> can leap straight up in a defense reflex--given its size, it might beat
    >> the human high-jump record.

    >
    >Don't you think a larger armadillo will have a poorer power-to-weight ratio?


    Dear Benjamin,

    I am reliably informed by numerous members of this newsgroup
    that reducing a bicycle's weight makes hardly any difference
    in climbing, so I must conclude . . .

    In any case, the giant armadillo of the pampas would
    obviously roll downhill faster.

    I entertain other theories of natural history, including the
    tragic failure of our ancestors to domesticate the woolly
    mammoth. But for their lack of forethought, we could be
    watching New Zealanders seeing who could shear such creaturs
    faster with hand lawn-mowers in front of television cameras.

    Carl Fogel
     
  15. [email protected] wrote:

    > On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:06:23 -0700, Benjamin Lewis
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I long to know how high a hundred-pound giant South American armadillo
    >>> can leap straight up in a defense reflex--given its size, it might beat
    >>> the human high-jump record.

    >>
    >> Don't you think a larger armadillo will have a poorer power-to-weight
    >> ratio?

    >
    > I am reliably informed by numerous members of this newsgroup
    > that reducing a bicycle's weight makes hardly any difference
    > in climbing, so I must conclude . . .


    :p

    Doubling the weight of a 20 lb bicycle under a 150 lb cyclist will increase
    the total weight be just a little over 10%.

    > In any case, the giant armadillo of the pampas would obviously roll
    > downhill faster.


    It would accelerate more slowly. It has higher rotational inertia.

    The terminal velocity is given by

    V = sqrt(2m/(Cd*p*A))

    where
    A == frontal area
    p == density
    Cd == drag coefficient
    m == mass

    Assuming perfectly spherical armadillos, we have

    m = p*(4/3)pi*r^3
    A = pi*r^2

    so m/A = (4/3)p*r

    thus the terminal velocity is given by

    V = sqrt(8r/3Cd),

    where r is the radius of the armadillo. As you say, the larger armadillo
    would eventually roll faster, but it would take longer to start. Whether
    it would win the race to the bottom of the hill would depend on the length
    of the hill. I am assuming all armadillos are equally dense, and are just
    as much of a drag, regardless of their stature.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    I regret to say that we of the FBI are powerless to act in cases of
    oral-genital intimacy, unless it has in some way obstructed interstate
    commerce. -- J. Edgar Hoover
     
  16. Benjamin Lewis wrote:

    > The terminal velocity is given by
    >
    > V = sqrt(2m/(Cd*p*A))
    >
    > where
    > A == frontal area
    > p == density
    > Cd == drag coefficient
    > m == mass


    Oops, that should be weight in that formula, not mass. Not that this
    changes the gist of the conclusions.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    I regret to say that we of the FBI are powerless to act in cases of
    oral-genital intimacy, unless it has in some way obstructed interstate
    commerce. -- J. Edgar Hoover
     
  17. Benjamin Lewis wrote:

    > Benjamin Lewis wrote:
    >
    >> The terminal velocity is given by
    >>
    >> V = sqrt(2m/(Cd*p*A))
    >>
    >> where
    >> A == frontal area
    >> p == density
    >> Cd == drag coefficient
    >> m == mass

    >
    > Oops, that should be weight in that formula, not mass. Not that this
    > changes the gist of the conclusions.


    Arrgh again. That p is air density, not armadillo density. In any case,
    the terminal velocity is still sqrt(k*r) for some constant k that I'm too
    lazy to recalculate. (k depends on armadillo density, air density,
    armadillo drag coefficient, and gravitational constant).

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    I regret to say that we of the FBI are powerless to act in cases of
    oral-genital intimacy, unless it has in some way obstructed interstate
    commerce. -- J. Edgar Hoover
     
  18. Jim Smith

    Jim Smith Guest

    Benjamin Lewis <[email protected]> writes:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:06:23 -0700, Benjamin Lewis
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> [email protected] wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>> I long to know how high a hundred-pound giant South American armadillo
    > >>> can leap straight up in a defense reflex--given its size, it might beat
    > >>> the human high-jump record.
    > >>
    > >> Don't you think a larger armadillo will have a poorer power-to-weight
    > >> ratio?

    > >
    > > I am reliably informed by numerous members of this newsgroup
    > > that reducing a bicycle's weight makes hardly any difference
    > > in climbing, so I must conclude . . .

    >
    > :p
    >
    > Doubling the weight of a 20 lb bicycle under a 150 lb cyclist will increase
    > the total weight be just a little over 10%.
    >
    > > In any case, the giant armadillo of the pampas would obviously roll
    > > downhill faster.

    >
    > It would accelerate more slowly. It has higher rotational inertia.
    >
    > The terminal velocity is given by
    >
    > V = sqrt(2m/(Cd*p*A))
    >
    > where
    > A == frontal area
    > p == density
    > Cd == drag coefficient
    > m == mass
    >
    > Assuming perfectly spherical armadillos, we have
    >
    > m = p*(4/3)pi*r^3
    > A = pi*r^2
    >
    > so m/A = (4/3)p*r
    >
    > thus the terminal velocity is given by
    >
    > V = sqrt(8r/3Cd),
    >
    > where r is the radius of the armadillo. As you say, the larger armadillo
    > would eventually roll faster, but it would take longer to start. Whether
    > it would win the race to the bottom of the hill would depend on the length
    > of the hill. I am assuming all armadillos are equally dense, and are just
    > as much of a drag, regardless of their stature.


    Dear Sir,

    I suspect that at normal operating armadillo speed the drag increases
    at less then the second power of speed. For a spherical armadillo (I
    should be so lucky!) I agree with the remainder of your analysis.

    The armadillos, however, take exception to your characterization of
    their species as "dense."
     
  19. Jim Smith wrote:

    > Dear Sir,
    >
    > I suspect that at normal operating armadillo speed the drag increases
    > at less then the second power of speed. For a spherical armadillo (I
    > should be so lucky!) I agree with the remainder of your analysis.
    >
    > The armadillos, however, take exception to your characterization of
    > their species as "dense."


    Well, to be fair, I was only characterizing armadillos with respect to
    other armadillos.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    I regret to say that we of the FBI are powerless to act in cases of
    oral-genital intimacy, unless it has in some way obstructed interstate
    commerce. -- J. Edgar Hoover
     
  20. Robert

    Robert Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    ----8<----cut

    we found the same irrefutable link
    > to armadillo-hopping.
    >
    > Since they do indeed seem to come completely off the ground,
    > I conclude that we are not discussing Welsh sprinting
    > armadillos, but Trevor Jeffrey, late of this newsgroup, may
    > beg to differ.


    Carl, or anyone else,
    What *did* happen to this Trevor Jeffrey guy? Last time I was here (a
    week or so back), he was shooting at everything and everyone that moved,
    especially if it had to do with spokes. Tens of postings a day, quite
    unbelievable. Looked as if for a while he'd usurp the regular major
    posters on this NG in terms of numbers of mails. And now . . . blessed
    silence. Did somebody stick in the verbal dagger or what happened?
    /Robert
     
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