Brake pads (rim roadie)

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Mr. Beanz, Nov 20, 2020.

  1. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Messages:
    1,686
    Likes Received:
    453
    Having used rim brakes all my life, I continue to use them and hope to never HAVE to switch with all the new tech today. I am perfectly happy and never had a problem stopping. Not even on descents at 40 MPH being a heavier Clydesdale cyclist.

    So speaking of rim brakes, I never understood this. Spend $30 for the brake shoes/pad with removable inserts. Then to replace the insert, is another $10 as needed.

    I myself but the entire brake pad/shoe for $10 or less. Why not do it this way rather than spending more just to have removeable inserts that cost the same to replace as the entire shoe?

    I have had both styles and did away with my removeable system. I have never had a problem stopping as mentioned.

    So why do cyclists insist on spending more money on the removeable inserts type ??? :confused:

    Am I missing something? Is it about style?

    --------------------------------------------------------

    Spend $30 for a set of brake pads with the removeable insert.

    01.JPG


    Then when the inserts wear out, spend another $10 to replace JUST the insert, JUST THE INSERT.

    02.JPG

    But for $10 or less, you get the whole brake shoe/pad.

    03.JPG
     
    Tags:


  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Messages:
    2,274
    Likes Received:
    138
    Some people are intimidated by the thought of positioning the pad. With inserts, you don’t need to reset the alignment.
     
    Mr. Beanz likes this.
  3. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    4,607
    Likes Received:
    368
    I hear you, but they're also not that expensive, $30 for the cartridge style will last at least 5 years with heavy use. But being cheap myself I just replace the pads, but I don't use Shimano pads, I didn't find them to grip as well as Kool-Stop Dura Type pads do, and that is really noticeable in the rain, plus the Dura pads last longer, like twice as long, but they cost twice as much so price wise they're a wash.
     
  4. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Messages:
    1,686
    Likes Received:
    453
    I thought about that. It does seem some people are easily intimidates with things like that. I wondered what would happen if I set them wrong but never had a problem. Line them up, use the business card to add some tow, easy.

    I can imagine the shop charges pretty good to install the brake pads as well. $30 and the labor to install, if the bike doesn't already come with that style. Can get expensive.
     
  5. Germanrazor

    Germanrazor Active Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2020
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    41
    I just purchase the insert pad and replace myself. No big deal what so ever.....but I also wrench a lot and can build a bike up blindfolded.
     
  6. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Messages:
    1,686
    Likes Received:
    453
    Yes but why? Was that style stock equipment on your bike? I can see this but my point is that why would people switch over if not equipped on a stock bike or decide on this type if building up one's own bike? I doubt there is an advantage to this type as far as stopping power, so other than stock equipment, I don't see a reason to switch.



    Exactly! But the shop charges you like it is an engine overhaul. First time a shop did a component swap on a warranty, they charged me $75. I thought it was a lot but paid it. The next time I needed a component swap, they wanted $220. WTH! I took the bike apart and swapped the frame at the shop. Took me about 20 minutes to strip the frame and about and hour to put it back together. I spent about $20 in tools, had the rest which are basic tools.

    The guy tried to make it sound like it was a tough technical job. I told him I built my own wheels as well and then he said, oh, Ok and gave up on trying to explain why I should let the shop do it for an overblown price. :D
     
  7. Germanrazor

    Germanrazor Active Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2020
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    41
    Maybe I am seeing something different here. Pads $8.99 or shoe and pads $28.99 to $31.99 depending. I just buy the pads at $8.99 and do myself. Savings of $20-$23 depending on which set.

    Takes about 3 minutes tops to do. I can see if you have a damaged shoe why you would buy the set together but for worn out pads....just buy pads myself.

    I use SwissStop myself. Not sure the days going rate on those but can’t be too much.
     
  8. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Messages:
    1,686
    Likes Received:
    453
    Well that is my point of this post, why chose the more expensive system if you HAD to replace the brakes/shoes system?

    As I said, if the bike is equipped with the system, then it's inexpensive. But in the case the shoes/pads need to be replaced totally, why would one chose the more expensive system?
     
Loading...
Loading...