Brake upgrade for tourer

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Richard Lucas, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. My Edinburgh Country has served me well for four years, but
    I've never been a great fan of the anonymous cantilever
    brakes. New Koolstop pads improved them slightly, but it
    still takes a lot of effort to stop the bike when it's
    laden. I have a carpel tunnel problem, and find this a
    painful process.

    Is there an alternative brake I can use to improve stopping
    and reduce the effort required, whilst not interfering with
    the mudguards?

    All advice gratefully received.

    Richard
     
    Tags:


  2. McBain_v1

    McBain_v1 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Have you looked into whether or not you could fit disc brakes?
     
  3. Greetings,

    Quite a few potential upgrades can be found on the St. Johns
    site, on the page http://www.sjscycles.com/store/vIndex.htm

    I used the LX cantis for many trouble free years, but when
    they finally wore I was sad that no more were available.

    T.T.F.N.

    SPENNY

    All should be compatible with the Sora levers that I seem to
    remember you get on the Country. "Richard Lucas"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My Edinburgh Country has served me well for four years,
    > but I've never been a great fan of the anonymous
    > cantilever brakes. New Koolstop pads improved them
    > slightly, but it still takes a lot of effort to stop the
    > bike when it's laden. I have a carpel tunnel problem, and
    > find this a painful process.
    >
    > Is there an alternative brake I can use to improve
    > stopping and reduce the effort required, whilst not
    > interfering with the mudguards?
    >
    > All advice gratefully received.
    >
    > Richard
     
  4. Richard Lucas wrote:

    > My Edinburgh Country has served me well for four years,
    > but I've never been a great fan of the anonymous
    > cantilever brakes. New Koolstop pads improved them
    > slightly, but it still takes a lot of effort to stop the
    > bike when it's laden. I have a carpel tunnel problem, and
    > find this a painful process.
    >
    > Is there an alternative brake I can use to improve
    > stopping and reduce the effort required, whilst not
    > interfering with the mudguards?

    Will V brakes fit? They are rather good, even if they were
    invented for all the wrong "don't sue us" reasons. Dia-Compe
    287V brake levers will work if you have drop bars.
     
  5. Cicero

    Cicero Guest

    "Richard Lucas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My Edinburgh Country has served me well for four years,
    > but I've never been a great fan of the anonymous
    > cantilever brakes. New Koolstop pads improved them
    > slightly, but it still takes a lot of effort to stop the
    > bike when it's laden. I have a carpel tunnel problem, and
    > find this a painful process.
    >
    > Is there an alternative brake I can use to improve
    > stopping and reduce the effort required, whilst not
    > interfering with the mudguards?
    >
    > All advice gratefully received.
    >
    > Richard

    ======================
    Consider a hub brake for the front. A hub brake is better in
    the wet apart from any other improvement in performance.
    Available form www.sjscycles.com

    Cic.
     
  6. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Richard Lucas
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > My Edinburgh Country has served me well for four years,
    > but I've
    never
    > been a great fan of the anonymous cantilever brakes. New
    > Koolstop pads improved them slightly, but it still takes a
    > lot of effort to stop the bike when it's laden. I have a
    > carpel tunnel problem, and find this a painful process.
    >
    > Is there an alternative brake I can use to improve
    > stopping and
    reduce
    > the effort required, whilst not interfering with the
    > mudguards?

    Does the bike have fittings for disk brakes? I know it's
    total overkill on a commuter bike, but hydraulic disk brakes
    are extremely powerful and reliable and take very little
    effort at the lever.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke)
    http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; making jokes about dyslexia isn't big, it isn't
    clever and ;; it isn't furry.
     
  7. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 17:51:23 +0000, Richard Lucas
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >Is there an alternative brake I can use to improve stopping
    >and reduce the effort required, whilst not interfering with
    >the mudguards?

    Avid Shorties, SunTour XC (?) cantis (wot I have but the
    bike is in the shed), or Magura hydraulic rim brakes would
    all be likely to fit, I think.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  8. Chris Heys

    Chris Heys Guest

    On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 17:51:23 +0000, Richard Lucas
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My Edinburgh Country has served me well for four years, but
    >I've never been a great fan of the anonymous cantilever
    >brakes. New Koolstop pads improved them slightly, but it
    >still takes a lot of effort to stop the bike when it's
    >laden. I have a carpel tunnel problem, and find this a
    >painful process.
    >
    >Is there an alternative brake I can use to improve stopping
    >and reduce the effort required, whilst not interfering with
    >the mudguards?
    >
    >All advice gratefully received.
    >
    >Richard

    Magura HS66 hydrolic rim brakes. The Dogs B*ll*cks. Mine
    clear mudgaurds no problem. Expensive at £140 + £20 for
    boosters (Settle Cycles?) but worth every penny.

    Chris
     
  9. Cicero wrote:

    > Consider a hub brake for the front. A hub brake is better
    > in the wet apart from any other improvement in
    > performance. Available form www.sjscycles.com

    Only if the fork is designed for it. Hub brakes put the
    reaction force on the fork right at the end, where it's
    thinnest. Rim brakes put the reaction force on the
    comparatively massive crown. And don't even consider a
    radial front wheel with a hub brake!
     
  10. [email protected] schreef ...

    > Does the bike have fittings for disk brakes? I know it's
    > total overkill on a commuter bike, but hydraulic disk
    > brakes are extremely powerful and reliable and take very
    > little effort at the lever.

    But alas quite a lot in the maintenance department. Contrary
    to the HS- 33 or HS-66.

    --
    Regards, Marten
     
  11. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On Sat, 06 Mar 2004, Zog The Undeniable <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Cicero wrote:
    >
    > > Consider a hub brake for the front. A hub brake is
    > > better in the wet apart from any other improvement in
    > > performance. Available form www.sjscycles.com
    >
    > Only if the fork is designed for it. Hub brakes put the
    > reaction force on the fork right at the end, where it's
    > thinnest. Rim brakes put the reaction force on the
    > comparatively massive crown.

    Unless teh hub brake has a long reaction arm, in which case
    it will put the force well away from teh end. (Plus, I can't
    imaging any hub brake that actually puts the force right at
    the end - it's always some way up teh blade, surely?)

    regards, Ian SMith
    --
    |\ /| no .sig
    |o o|
    |/ \|
     
  12. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Ian Smith wrote:

    > (Plus, I can't imaging any hub brake that actually puts
    > the force right at the end - it's always some way up teh
    > blade, surely?)

    Well, it's a moment, innit, so there is always a force
    right at the tip, and another force an arbitrary distance
    up the blade...

    Congratulations on spelling "the" correctly twice in that
    sentence, BTW :)

    James
     
  13. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Marten Hoffmann wrote:
    > [email protected] schreef ...
    >
    >> Does the bike have fittings for disk brakes? I know it's
    >> total overkill on a commuter bike, but hydraulic disk
    >> brakes are extremely powerful and reliable and take very
    >> little effort at the lever.
    >
    > But alas quite a lot in the maintenance department.
    > Contrary to the HS- 33 or HS-66.

    Funny, I've not had to touch my disk brakes in four years
    apart from replacing the pads. Never managed that little
    maintenance with cantis and Vs

    Tony
     
  14. On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 20:21:43 +0000, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 17:51:23 +0000, Richard Lucas
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    ><[email protected]>:
    >
    >>Is there an alternative brake I can use to improve
    >>stopping and reduce the effort required, whilst not
    >>interfering with the mudguards?
    >
    >Avid Shorties, SunTour XC (?) cantis (wot I have but the
    >bike is in the shed), or Magura hydraulic rim brakes would
    >all be likely to fit, I think.

    I replaced my crappy original cantis with Avid Shorty 4's -
    very happy. The stopping power feels just about as good as
    on my mountain bike with centrepulls. They fit over full
    mudguards and 30mm tyres. Some people have complained about
    those brakes being noisy, but I haven't had that problem.
     
  15. "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Marten Hoffmann wrote:
    > > [email protected] schreef ...
    > >
    > >> Does the bike have fittings for disk brakes? I know
    > >> it's total overkill on a commuter bike, but hydraulic
    > >> disk brakes are extremely powerful and reliable and
    > >> take very little effort at the lever.
    > >
    > > But alas quite a lot in the maintenance department.
    > > Contrary to the HS- 33 or HS-66.
    >
    > Funny, I've not had to touch my disk brakes in four years
    > apart from
    replacing
    > the pads. Never managed that little maintenance with
    > cantis and Vs
    >
    > Tony
    >
    >

    My MTB which is now a commuter has been running Magura rim
    brakes for 5 years now; only had to change the pads and once
    do a slight readjustment when I changed the fork. It seems
    the 5 year cable and seal guarantee is a genuine deal! Plus
    the "Tomac" red is very pretty, albeit rather scratched now!

    T.T.F.N.

    SPENNY
     
  16. James Annan wrote:

    > Congratulations on spelling "the" correctly twice in that
    > sentence, BTW :)

    It's very common in l33t-5p3ak!
     
  17. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004, James Annan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Ian Smith wrote:
    >
    >
    > > (Plus, I can't imaging any hub brake that actually puts
    > > the force right at the end - it's always some way up
    > > teh blade, surely?)
    >
    > Well, it's a moment, innit,

    I'd have described it as a couple which causes a moment in
    the fork blade (or possibly blades).

    I've thought of an arrangement that _does_ put the reaction
    moment right at the end - you'd have a cross-piece at the
    end of teh fork blade, and mount the brake calliper
    (assuming a typical current disc brake) on teh cross-piece.
    The couple would then be effectively beyond the tip of teh
    blade, and therefore there'd be the full brake-induced
    moment the full length of teh blade.

    > Congratulations on spelling "the" correctly twice in that
    > sentence, BTW :)

    Gosh. Still, at least it was teh customary spelling for teh
    third one.

    regards, Ian SMith
    --
    |\ /| no .sig
    |o o|
    |/ \|
     
  18. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Zog The Undeniable wrote:
    > James Annan wrote:
    >
    >> Congratulations on spelling "the" correctly twice in that
    >> sentence, BTW :)
    >
    >
    > It's very common in l33t-5p3ak!

    I do it myslef often enouhg. Ian seems to have turned it
    itno an art fomr thouhg.

    James
     
  19. On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 20:21:43 +0000, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 17:51:23 +0000, Richard Lucas
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    ><[email protected]>:
    >
    >>Is there an alternative brake I can use to improve
    >>stopping and reduce the effort required, whilst not
    >>interfering with the mudguards?
    >
    >Avid Shorties, SunTour XC (?) cantis (wot I have but the
    >bike is in the shed), or Magura hydraulic rim brakes would
    >all be likely to fit, I think.

    Thanks for all the replies. I've chosen this message to
    reply to as it summarizes my shortlist rather neatly. The
    Avid Shorties look like the lowest cost option, and were my
    first thought, but I'm very tempted by the hydraulics. Now,
    what's a good choice of adjustable brake lever for a drop
    bar tourer?
     
  20. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 00:26:20 GMT, Andrew Reddaway
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >Some people have complained about those brakes being noisy,
    >but I haven't had that problem.

    Noise is usually down to pads, IME. Unless the securing
    bolts are loose, in which case the noise is the least of
    your problems...

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
Loading...
Loading...