brakes on drop bars

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by Matt Ashbrook, Sep 6, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. I just converted a hybrid bike to a touring/commuting bike. I guess the biggest change is flat bars
    to drop bars. Everything seems to work OK, but the road brake levers paired with the cantilever
    brakes leaves alot to be desired. I wouldn't mind mechanical disc brakes, but I'm under the
    impression they require special hubs and I ain't even opening that can of worms! How about using a
    complete mountain bike brake/shift system butted right up against the stem? Any other ideas? I might
    be able to put side pull road brakes up front, but I'm not sure about the back. Plus I've got a 700
    x 38 tire and fenders on this bike, which probably would eliminate road brakes Yes? No? Help me out
    with this, please!

    Matt A.
     
    Tags:


  2. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Matt Ashbrook" <[email protected]> writes:

    >I just converted a hybrid bike to a touring/commuting bike. I guess the biggest change is flat bars
    >to drop bars. Everything seems to work OK, but the road brake levers paired with the cantilever
    >brakes leaves alot to be desired. I wouldn't mind mechanical disc brakes, but I'm under the
    >impression they require special hubs and I ain't even opening that can of worms! How about using a
    >complete mountain bike brake/shift system butted right up against the stem? Any other ideas? I
    >might be able to put side pull road brakes up front, but I'm not sure about the back. Plus I've got
    >a 700 x 38 tire and fenders on this bike, which probably would eliminate road brakes Yes? No? Help
    >me out with this, please!

    There are a couple of devices designed to make "road" levers more compatible with cantis. "Travel
    agent" is one of them. Check the Nashbar catalog or web site, it's item TA-WT-S.

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  3. Chris Neary

    Chris Neary Guest

    >I just converted a hybrid bike to a touring/commuting bike. I guess the biggest change is flat bars
    >to drop bars. Everything seems to work OK, but the road brake levers paired with the cantilever
    >brakes leaves alot to be desired.

    Most road brake levers are designed for use with sidepull brakes, and will pull less cable than
    a corresponding mountain lever will. This will usually lead to poor brake performance such as
    you describe.

    If this is your situation, you have a couple of options:

    1) Switch to a brake lever designed for use with cantilever brakes.

    2) Install an adaptor which will modify the cable pull of your existing brake lever. An example can
    be seen at: http://tinyurl.com/mhgx

    (My experience with such gadgets is they do work as advertised, but brake lever feel still leaves
    something to be desired)

    Good luck!

    Chris Neary [email protected]

    "Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the
    elements I loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
     
  4. "Matt Ashbrook" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I just converted a hybrid bike to a touring/commuting bike. I guess the biggest change is flat
    > bars to drop bars. Everything seems to work OK, but the road brake levers paired with the
    > cantilever brakes leaves alot to be desired. ....Any other ideas? I might be able to put side pull
    > road brakes up front, but I'm not sure about the back. Plus I've got a 700 x 38 tire and fenders
    > on this bike, which probably would eliminate road brakes Yes? No?

    Indeed sidepull brakes won't work with anything larger than 700x25 without fenders. The long-reach
    sidepull brakes would work with something slightly larger, but not much... and the longer the brake
    reach, the harder they are to use.

    There are a few options.

    1. Use v-brakes with Dia-Compe 287-V brake levers. These levers are designed to pull more cable and
    therefore work appropriately with v-brakes. However, you need either bar-end or downtube
    shifters. Probably not what you had in mind.

    2. Use STI or Ergo briefters (shifter-brake lever combo) with v-brakes and a gizmo called either
    V-daptor or Travel Agent.

    3. Readjust your cantilever brakes. This is certainly the cheapest option. Cantilever brakes allow a
    lot of adjustment, especially if you use a traditional straddle cable. I'd suggest you read
    http://sheldonbrown.com/cantilever-adjustment.html to see how you could adjust them.

    Regards,

    Michel Gagnon
     
  5. Actually, I already am using Bar-ends and plan to keep them. Are the Dia-Comp 287V levers the "aero"
    type or does the cable come out of the "horn"? "Michel Gagnon" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > "Matt Ashbrook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I just converted a hybrid bike to a touring/commuting bike. I guess the biggest change is flat
    > > bars to drop bars. Everything seems to work OK,
    but
    > > the road brake levers paired with the cantilever brakes leaves alot to
    be
    > > desired. ....Any other ideas? I might be able to put side pull road brakes up front, but I'm not
    > > sure about the back. Plus I've got a 700 x 38 tire
    and
    > > fenders on this bike, which probably would eliminate road brakes Yes?
    No?
    >
    >
    > Indeed sidepull brakes won't work with anything larger than 700x25 without fenders. The long-reach
    > sidepull brakes would work with something slightly larger, but not much... and the longer the
    > brake reach, the harder they are to use.
    >
    > There are a few options.
    >
    > 1. Use v-brakes with Dia-Compe 287-V brake levers. These levers are designed to pull more cable
    > and therefore work appropriately with v-brakes. However, you need either bar-end or downtube
    > shifters. Probably not what you had in mind.
    >
    > 2. Use STI or Ergo briefters (shifter-brake lever combo) with v-brakes and a gizmo called either
    > V-daptor or Travel Agent.
    >
    > 3. Readjust your cantilever brakes. This is certainly the cheapest option. Cantilever brakes allow
    > a lot of adjustment, especially if you use a traditional straddle cable. I'd suggest you read
    > http://sheldonbrown.com/cantilever-adjustment.html to see how you could adjust them.
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Michel Gagnon
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...